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10 votes

What does "il n'y a pas de hors-texte" mean in philosophy and literary criticism?

My understanding is that the key to understanding the phrase is surprisingly simple. According to Michael Wood in the London Review of Books: "It did not hold, as many of its detractors thought it ...
D. McMullan's user avatar
8 votes

What does "il n'y a pas de hors-texte" mean in philosophy and literary criticism?

Derrida once explained that this assertion [means] there is nothing outside context. source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Derrida#Philosophy So inasmuch as literary criticism and ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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5 votes

How do structuralism and post-structuralism change the way I read a novel?

Structuralism and post-structuralism is, roughly speaking, a distinction without a difference, so we can look at them together. In your question, you state: From a naive point of view, these ideas ...
virmaior's user avatar
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3 votes

What gives rise to the preponderance of 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern's?

The first thing that comes to mind is that having a duplicate marks the character(s) as disposable. Once a character is disposable he's more pliable as a comic prop. It might also be particularly ...
Tim kinsella's user avatar
3 votes

Do any Marxists write about Ulysses' "nightmare of history"

Dedalus' 'History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake' has an echo in Marx's 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte : Men make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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3 votes

Fredric Jameson's "Dialectical Sentences"

In regards to Jameson, the assertion that we could take individual sentences, lift them out of context and observe their "dialectical" style, is itself an inherently undialectical approach (...
Calvin Saxon's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Did Nietzsche say that Dostoevsky "cried truth [from the blood]"?

IMO, it is a "fake quote". You can find it in many places on the web, but without references. You reference is : The Handy Philosophy Answer Book and the quote is preceded by : "the only ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
1 vote

Who did Schopenhauer have in mind when he wrote about "bad writers"?

Schopenhauer was at war with Hegel and, after his death (1831), with anybody who did not consider him to be the most important living philosopher. The 'bad writers' are the Hegelians which were ...
sand1's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

What is autonomy in art, where does it come from?

I am going to (try to) answer the questions down to the line across the page. To go beyond that into hermeneutics, contemporary literary criticism, Deleuze, and post deconstruction would draw out the ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

Is metonym, the figure of speech, about two things, like metaphor is?

Welcome to PSE. 'Metonymy' derives from the Greek for 'a change of name' or 'through the name'). It is easily illustrated. 'The Kremlin' can be used to refer to the Russian government because the two ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

Are there philosophers working with the idea of language being ideological?

It's a vast topic as you realise. It might be useful to point you initially in the direction of Noelle Bisseret. Her main views are indicated in the following review by David Hogan : Language and ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

Looking for a place to start with 'ideology' and 'autonomy' in literary criticism, especially so called "moral criticism"

Not all ideology will contrast with autonomy but where it does the contrast plays out in the difference between authoritarianism and its opposite. This is authoritarianism not so much as the ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Any deconstruction or "after theory" texts related specifically to poetry?

As to what your friend might mean by "after theory": I understand it to be a strain of thinking that speculates on the end of theory (especially postmodern and poststructuralist theory, which ...
Alex's user avatar
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1 vote

How to distinguish philosophy and literature?

More of an extended comment than a full answer. This is an interesting question at one level, but it loses some of its force if one disagrees with the idea that Nietzsche isn't really a philosopher. ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
1 vote

Does Benjamin claim that revolution is a corporeal meaninglessness?

Only when in technology body and image so interpenetrate that all revolutionary tension becomes bodily collective innervation, and all the bodily innervations of the collective become ...
John Am's user avatar
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1 vote

What does "il n'y a pas de hors-texte" mean in philosophy and literary criticism?

The answer that I prefer is the one offered by Derrida himself: that only the ‘context’ is stable and real, that is to say can be said to exist. By this one may may say the individual and his/her ‘...
John Outram's user avatar

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