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Usually Karl Popper is credited with having contributed to the death of logical positivism, so no, I wouldn't say Karl Popper is a logical positivist. That being said, many analytic philosophers after logical positivism still kept much of the attitude of positivism, such as logical analysis, defining ones terms, skepticism towards "grand" metaphysical ...


4

It would be worthwhile distinguishing between a conditional sentence in the object language and a conditional in the metalanguage. Some deductive arguments have a conditional in the object language, e.g. those of the form modus ponens or modus tollens. Some arguments do not, e.g. those of the form conjunction elimination, disjunction elimination, etc. But ...


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A language that is "precise, rigidly defined, and totally unambiguous" would be unable to say anything meaningful at all. Consider a simple phrase like "a red ball": would we need to have separate phrases for each and every possible ball, of each and every possible shade of red? How many words would we need in our language for that? How would we be sure that ...


2

The quick and easy answer to your question is no. In fact, Popper was a critic of logical positivism. From WP on Popper: Here, he criticised psychologism, naturalism, inductivism, and logical positivism, and put forth his theory of potential falsifiability as the criterion demarcating science from non-science. Logical positivism had a number of ...


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Wittgenstein is getting at the idea that any formal system rests on certain arbitrarily-chosen conventions, and by choosing different arbitrary conventions we can create different formal systems that represent exactly the same physical reality. For instance, because of early history we habitually do plane geometry on a flat plane with orthogonal axes. Thus, ...


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