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Geoffrey Thomas's answer is very complete and, as far as I know, completely accurate. Marx regarded human beings as Homo Faber, the animal that creates and produces. That is our essence, in a somewhat Aristotelean manner. We create our world and find meaning in what we create. Yet we do not do so in the manner of Robinson Crusoe, a stock character in Marx's ...


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Marx's views on enfranchisement, hence on disenfranchisement, fall within his attitude towards political emancipation - the achievement of such rights as the right to vote, to hold property, to express one's opinions, the right to follow one's own religion, the right to personal security, &c. In On the Jewish Question (1844) he dismissed such rights, ...


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For my own part, I do not see the benefits of reading an author's personality into a philosophical work, even in the far more difficult case of Heidegger. If there is anything philosophers share in common, it is the struggle to prevent their field from being reduced to psychology. Still, one can make such arguments. Marxist critics, for their own part, have ...


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If you follow this link you'll discover that Albert Einstein had a tendency to get his freak on. But to date (so far as I know) Einstein's sexual escapades have not undercut the principles of modern physics. Well... I suppose they might sow some doubts about the Big Bang theory, but honestly... It's an obscure truism that philosophy is psychology writ large. ...


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The Red Prussian by Leopold Schwarzschild, 1986 ed., is an even more savage assault on Marx’s personality. It depicts Marx’s ideas and arguments as intellectually worthless and as used by Marx as a mere means of dominating working-class movements in the interests of gaining personal power. Neither Johnson nor Schwarzschild has much insight into the nature of ...


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I agree 100 percent with the inexplicably deleted and downvoted answer by Hide-in-Plain-Site. Constraining digital information flows, growing at the rate of Moore's Law, in the legal terminology and mindset of 18th-century land ownership is a perfect example. For Marx and Engels this dialectic between accelerating forces of production and the static social ...


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It would be useful here to be a bit more specific about what aspect of Marxism you are considering when you consider whether or not it is falsifiable. Based on your question, I'm going to assume that you are referring to Marx's theory of historical development of society, the latter part of which is the alleged historical path from capitalism to socialism ...


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