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1

The issues hangs on what we mean by 'empirical'. You say, Given that no empirical evidence will truly disprove either side, it is a matter of probability. Here you are assuming that 'empirical' means 'sensory'. This accords with most dictionary definitions and is not a problem. But consciousness is not an empirical phenomenon and yet we know we are ...


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There are several questions here and there are several different domains of philosophy involved. One major question is about ontology: is what we call 'free will' a 'real' experience and what's the difference between that and it being 'only a perception'? There's a broad range of thoughts on this, some of which veer into theology, but also things like "...


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In my answer to the original question, I started with the observation that thoughts consist of nerve impulses. While it is true that the physiological processes that form nerve impulses involve electrical currents and chemistry, and that these in turn could be described by (deterministic) equations, the human brain consists of a staggeringly large number of ...


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