4

What's the point of working when all money will eventually perish? Why bother going to school when your brain is just a temporary storing unit that decays and will eventually perish too? Why do anything, knowing that nothing will be worth while and that eventually everything will be destroyed in the inevitable heatdeath of our universe? Thing is, you're ...


3

You my friend, are not alone! And I for one congratulate you for seeking answers. You're also seeking answers in the right place. I had exactly the same experience and to some extent I still do, probably always will. But so do countless millions of others. Though this feeling is more common now (in fact it used to be called 'the modern disease') humans have ...


2

According to Terry Eagleton, what makes life meaningful is not metaphysical knowledge, but ethical living: (page 93) The meaning of life is less a proposition than a practice. It is not an esoteric truth, but a certain form of life. As such, it can only be really known in the living. What kind of ethical living leads to this meaningful life? He notes ...


2

Terry Eagleton returns to Wittgenstein toward the end of The Meaning of Life. On pages 93-4 he writes: The meaning of life is less a proposition than a practice. It is not an esoteric truth, but a form of life. As such, it can only really be known in the living. Perhaps this is what Wittgenstein had in mind when he observed in the Tractatus that 'We feel ...


2

This isn't necessarily about death or the end of the universe (as other answers suggest). You may as well ask: What's the point of eating ice cream if the taste goes away shortly after? What's the point of going on a trip if it's going to end anyway? You could ask those questions even if we and the universe continued to exist forever. You seem to be ...


2

With further searching I found the answer in Hugh S. Moorhead's The Meaning of Life, page 164-165. The quote comes from a letter to Hugh Moorhead from Bertrand Russell on January 10, 1952. Moorhead had sent various authors, including Russell, a copy of one of their books asking them to autograph the book with an answer to the question: What is the meaning ...


1

Albert Camus gives in the preface an explanation of his intent: The fundamental subject of The Myth of Sisyphus is this: it is legitimate and necessary to wonder whether life has a meaning; therefore it is legitimate to meet the problem of suicide face to face. The answer, underlying and appearing through the paradoxes which cover it, is this: even if one ...


1

Become immortal - blessing or curse? You come into existence and become immortal. You could extent this idea this way--'You come into existence from something mortal and become immortal'. From a mortal thing you become immortal. Is it reasonable? Become immortal....who/what? Body or soul? If the answer is 'body', it never happens for it is made up of ...


1

Speaking within the domain of our perception (that means, accepting that things exist, that causality is something natural, that we have goals, etc.), and excluding any physicalist perspective (that is, excluding physics, quantum mechanics, the inexistence of causality and goals and so on...), our ultimate goal (as human beings, not as rational individuals) ...


1

Empirically we can predict that we will all die and when that occurs time will take away the knowledge we have acquired. We can see that this loss of knowledge could occur even prior to death with diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's. There are philosophers who claim that there is an eternal reality underlying this temporal flux. Dominic J. O'Meara ...


1

My understanding of it is that it is asking whether there is an objective value, or objective purpose to life. I don't believe that your meaning, if found, will be objective. I'm concerned that looking for objective meaning limits a person to only those candidate meanings that apply equally to everyone, while in Western society we tend to agree that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible