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20 votes

Comedy we play everyday and pretend everything is fine?

The first person who comes to mind is Albert Camus who won the 1957 Nobel Prize for literature, and authored many writings that contributed to the ideas in the philosophy known as absurdism. "......
joseph h's user avatar
  • 301
12 votes
Accepted

Do Wittgenstein and Quine give the same criticisms of semantics?

Yes and no. They both criticize a certain approach to semantic theory that can be called realism about meaning. Roughly, realists see meanings as some kind of entities, although there is a wide range ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 42.8k
12 votes

What fallacy infers motivation from mere description?

The issue in the example seems to be that the word "dominate" is used in two different senses. When this is done in an argument (it is not clear that this is so here) the fallacy is called ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 42.8k
8 votes

Is verificationism dead?

There is nothing without prefiguration in philosophy; and the dead usually rise from their graves. So, to follow Mauro's lead: According to the standard textbook account, verificationism is a ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.6k
6 votes

Can a life have a trivial meaning if it's all there is?

The whole discussion whether life is trivial or meaningful seems to me to be based on the wrong assumption that significance or insignificance is a property inherent to life, that life qua life is ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 28.2k
6 votes

What fallacy infers motivation from mere description?

My interpretation is that the original statements are not necessarily fallacious, but rather a question of the semantics carried by the word "dominate." To dominate can mean colloquially that one ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
6 votes

What's the name of the argumentation position / logical fallacy of saying "well prove it doesn't exist"

It's called shifting the burden of proof. burden of proof You said that the burden of proof lies not with the person making the claim, but with someone else to disprove. - yourlogicalfallacyis....
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 450
6 votes
Accepted

With infinite language would the meaning of words collapse?

Isn't every natural language an infinite language in the sense that it can generate infinitely many sentences and infinitely many word-tokens ? This is the case even if most of these sentences are ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.6k
5 votes

Is the pleasure of drugs better than long term achievements?

My first point is: hard drugs aren't generally as good as people imagine. Heroin makes your skin itch all over and gives you terrible constipation. Cocaine turns you into an intolerable arse of a ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.1k
5 votes

Is asking to align on definition during a debate a derailling or disingenuous demand?

You were definitely being reasonable. Half the so-called problems of philosophy build down to vague use of language, and arguments at cross-purpose are the common result of a failure to pay attention ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 17.8k
5 votes

Michael Dummett on the indeterminacy thesis

Assume that the scenario involving "two equally acceptable schemes of translation from a language L into a language M might carry a given sentence of L respectively into distinct sentences of M ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How are you intended to interpret x.R and x.S in Davidson "Truth and Meaning"?

The phrase x̂(x=x) means 'the x such that x=x'. This is just a way of forming a singular term that refers to something. The . is conjunction ('and'). So x̂(x=x.R)=x̂(x=x) is logically equivalent to ...
E...'s user avatar
  • 6,466
4 votes

Is Peirce's pragmatic maxim self-evident?

Not exactly. Peirce himself considered it a distillation of "common sense", but he offered it as an alternative to the then dominant Cartesian foundationalism. Many disputed the pragmatic ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 42.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Would a pragmatist allow that meaning is representational of things in its use?

I do not think that there is any issue with viewing signification as an activity, in fact this is how pragmatists view it since Peirce. In modern terms, pragmatism asserts semantic and epistemological ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 42.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Can there be a sufficient account of meaning without an account of intentionality?

I think that any comprehensive account of meaning must include an account of intentionality, but the real challenge is to give an account of both meaning and intentionality in non-intentional terms. ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 42.8k
4 votes
Accepted

What are the relations between externalism (Kripke, Putnam) and holism (Quine) about meaning?

Holism is an epistemological position, and externalism is a semantic one. Of course, some degree of interaction is to be expected, but not only is it possible to hold them together, it is not ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 42.8k
4 votes

Can purpose be attributed to events without grounding in agency

To answer the title question: Can purpose be attributed to events without grounding in agency? Yes. There are several examples: Daniel Dennett in several of his lectures explains how nature ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
4 votes

If I think life has meaning, then does that mean life is not meaningless?

'Meaning of life' questions are exceptionally difficult, at any rate I find them so. I'm inclined to say that life is not meaningless merely because (or if) you believe it to have meaning. If, for ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.6k
4 votes

Is verificationism dead?

The answer by Geoffrey Thomas is helpful, but a point made in the text deserves amplification. It could reasonably be said that verificationism lives on. But only because the question of "...
senderle's user avatar
  • 528
4 votes

Do we have to know certain things in order to die authentically happily?

"There are those who do not realize that one day we all must die. But those who do realize this settle their quarrels." -from the opening section of The Dhammapada "I don't know why we ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.1k
4 votes

Where is the line between semantics and ontology?

"In this sort of predicament, always ask yourself: How did we learn the meaning of this word ("good", for instance)? From what sort of examples? In what language-games? Then it will be ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.1k
4 votes

How does the Buddhist pursue meaning?

Disclaimer: I'm not a Buddhist, but I'm somewhat familiar with Zen Buddhism. Buddhism is about liberation from suffering by letting go of attachments to the material world. According to Buddhism, the ...
causative's user avatar
  • 11.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Michael Dummett on the indeterminacy thesis

Your response is a standard initial one to Quine’s thought experiment. We naturally assume that the translator is making some kind of imposition onto his observed subject language community, and that ...
Paul Ross's user avatar
  • 5,401
4 votes
Accepted

Is it possible for words to have a meaning other than how they are used?

Meanings of words are attributed to them by humans. One consequence is that you can never be sure whether the meaning of a word intended by the person who utters or writes it is the same as the ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 17.8k
4 votes

Are some narratives worse than death?

Many people judge their end-of-life suffering to be worse than death. This has led some jurisdictions to allow for medical assistance in dying. The Supreme Court of Canada even concluded that ...
Lowri's user avatar
  • 213
4 votes

Without good and evil, are we left with mediocrity only?

You make morality sound like spice. Without spice we can only eat bland food. So, without morality, everything is neutral? To take your example. Is the climate crisis a good thing. No. Did anyone who ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 2,236
3 votes

How does Derrida explain the possibility of meaningful communication and linguistic coordination?

The question is a powerful one. You might consider the possibility that Derrida never achieves what you suggest he should, and that he is in fact most of the time playing the sort of intra-...
shorewalker's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between propositional sign and proposition in Wittgenstein's Tractatus?

See Frank Plumpton Ramsey, The Foundations of mathematics (1931), page 274: A propositional sign is a sentence ; but this statement must be qualified, for by 'sentence' may be meant something of ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar

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