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A good introduction is the second volume of Gabbay & Woods (2008), Handbook of the History of Logic, where you'll find the mnemonics explained on pp 331ff. The mnemonics themselves seems to have originated in 13th century textbooks. For the original, see: de Rijk (1967), Logica Modernorum, vol 2, pp 362ff. I would also recommend Kretzmann, Kenny & ...


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Explanation of the Mnemonic Brody, Boruch A. "Logical Terms, Glossary of." Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Ed. Donald M. Borchert. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2006. 533-560. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 19 May 2016.: mnemonic terms The names that the medieval logicians introduced for the valid syllogisms. One such term is "...


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This is, perhaps, one of the earliest surviving derivations of the law of explosion, known by the Latin name ex falso sequitur quodlibet, contradiction implies anything. It seems very counterintuitive, but it is hard to pinpoint where things go wrong. "Conditional exchange" is the definition of the material conditional, which is controversial. Indeed, it ...


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Think of some examples. Here's a classic Thomist "analogical" term: "healthy". Properly speaking it is only bodies that are healthy, and for a body to be healthy is for it to be in good working order. For medicine to be healthy isn't for the medicine to be in good working order, it is for the medicine to have the power to put bodies into good working order. ...


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Ens rationis = a being of reason is a “thing dependent for its existence upon reason or thought.“ The term being of reason contrasts to the term real being (ens in re extra animam). But of course being of reason does not exclude real being: Two kinds of entia rationis are distinguished: those with a foundation in reality and those without one. The objects ...


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