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There is a simple, straightforward reason that memetics has not 'caught on' and become more widely accepted: the concept underlying it — depending on how one interprets the term 'meme' — are either philosophically derivative or nonsensical pseudoscience. The mere fact that I have to qualify that statement by pointing out that the term 'meme' is in dire need ...


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I'm not particularly convinced by Dawkins analogy, interesting though it is at first sight; it's a variant of Darwinism as a philosophy - as opposed to biology - applied to both culture and epistemology. One might call it a revival of social Darwinism, like Spencerism, on the cultural plane, interpreting culture broadly to include science, the arts and ...


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Note: I'm answering the question in the body of the question, not the question that comprises the title of this page. Once you accept memetic evolution, I'd say yes, with the caveat that your language for expressing it over anthropomorphises (sic?) the meme. The idea that any genes or memes have a kind of will that drives them to replicate is foreign to ...


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I think there are a few tactics in play. First of all, I think it appeals to a sense that many people have that the media is not always reporting on important things. And certainly in modern times, with all these allegations of 'fake news', many people look at the media as untrustworthy and pushing certain agenda's. Now, whether this is really the case is ...


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I have been reading a book now about objects, which the author calls "machines". Machines have inputs and outputs, and reorganize flows of other machines, while being reorganized by the flows themselves. Machines have a purpose when coupled with other machines. Machines can be corporeal (e.g. a knife) or incorporeal (e.g. a meme of a knife) per speculative ...


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Where semiotics is essentially the study of symbols and their manipulation for their own sake, memetics is a "neo-Darwinian" evolutionary theory of the ideas communicated via those symbols. Besides Dawkins, Daniel Dennett and psychologist Susan Blackmore have contributed most strongly to the theory of memetics. Whether it will end up as a branch of ...


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Dawkins talks about replicants, and he seems to fluctuate between two very different, and not obviously compatible, versions of his "theory": 1) memes are selected according to their ability to help their "hosts" to reproduce (for instance, religions that forbid reproductive control tend to spread because they make their faithful reproduce more), and 2) ...


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