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Why does the universe need an origin?

In the Aggi-Vacchagotta Sutta Buddha has this discourse: As he was sitting there he asked the Blessed One: "How is it, Master Gotama, does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The cosmos is eternal: ...
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Why does the universe need an origin?

As the answers above show, if by universe you roughly mean physical reality, this is the wrong place to ask. If by universe you mean all of reality simpliciter, then there are some tools that might ...
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Why does the universe need an origin?

If you desire a factual answer, or an estimate motivated by the best computer modeling currently available, you are looking in the wrong place. This is a question best posed to practitioners of ...
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Why does the universe need an origin?

What is the universe? What does it look like? Since we rely on cosmology to even describe what's there, mainstream philosophy leaves it to cosmology too determine the most probable theory of the ...
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What does Kant refer to when writing about "dreaming (träumenden) idealism" and "visionary (schwärmenden) idealism"?

This is explicitly answered in the introduction to the Cambridge Edition written by Gary Hatfield, in the comments on the structure of the work, where he gives a short summary of the main text. He ...
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Why does the universe need an origin?

The historical Buddha refused to answer questions like Is the world eternal or is the world not eternal? He left ‚undeclared‘ the issue (E.g., Majjhima Nikaya 63, Cula-Malunkyovada Sutta). Because ...
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Necessary A Posteriori

Kripke is making clear that there are two different kinds of distinction here (or maybe more than two). There is a distinction between necessary and contingent on the one hand, and a distinction ...
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Based on these 8 beliefs, which school of philosophy should I focus on?

Your 8 points don't make for a single coherent philosophy, but many of them are compatible with a family of open minded pragmatic empiricists. Karl Popper is a leading figure in what I recommend. He ...
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Necessary A Posteriori

Kripke is confused. We cannot know that anything is so necessarily with empirical knowledge, it is all contingent and possibly over-rulable with further information we gain about the world. When we ...
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How do we answer the question of "what is it"?

Short Answer Well, three ways philosophers usually answer the question of 'what is it' are names, definitions and descriptions, and explanations with the first being the briefest and the last being ...
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How do we answer the question of "what is it"?

When trying to answer a why question, no matter how many intermediate logical steps are explained there may always arise a new why question. So generally we accept a logical consequence of one thing ...
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What's the justification for holding concrete more than abstractions?

You can consider concrete more real in the sense that many/all people perceive it as real, so it is "used" and/or "referenced" more often. On the other side, ideas and thoughts ...
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-1 votes

Does the principle of explosion contain all analytic knowledge?

“From falsehood or contradiction anything follows”. Just means that (false -> true) is true and (false -> false) is also true. Or, if you want it more high-level, if your premises are wrong, ...
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The relationship between energy and information

The starting point for this question is that in physics, conservation of energy is a highly powerful working assumption. And also, many physics problems can be translated into information terms, ...
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The relationship between energy and information

Short Answer As all things philosophical, metaphysical presuppositions matter, but I think from a perspective influenced by the Kantian notions of forms of concepts the answer would be no, it would be ...
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Does the principle of explosion contain all analytic knowledge?

Does the principle of explosion contain all analytic knowledge? No. The principle of explosion isn't even a logical principle. Essentially, it is the fallacious consequence of interpreting the ...
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What is the distinction between mysticism and metaphysics?

Many people confuse metaphysics with mysticism as they attend to the same things. Hence it is useful to disentangle their meanings. First, the term 'metaphysics' was introduced by an editor of ...
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Nothing vs something

In Meinongian theory, objects that do not exist still have being. And hence we can formulate their opposite: objects that do have existence.
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Russell v. Meinong

It's primarily ontological. Meinong's innovation was how to think about such things as unicorns. They do not exist but yet we can reason about them. His theory of dealing with this grew out of his ...
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What is the distinction between mysticism and metaphysics?

Thank you for the post it intrigues my curiosity. Before I began to study philosophy, I was heavily considerate of wanting a mystical experience, when I came to a realization of an indescribable ...
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Nothing vs something

I suppose one way to try to paraphrase the idea is to say, "What if, for all variables x, x does not equal zero?" That there are no zero-cases? Then we'd see the problem: for then there'd be ...
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In Kant, what would happen if singular objects that we perceive in space didn't necessarily have the spatial properties that we perceive them to have?

The problem with modern authors lies with the two centuries of disparagement against Kant which serves as the basis of their analyses. Kant's synthesis of apprehension in the A version of his ...
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Is God a solipsist?

The likely answer is yes. This is because if we say God created something outside then we are assuming God has a location in relation to what he has created. This involves assuming that God is in ...
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Is "there are synthetic a priori truths" a synthetic a priori truth?

According to Kant a synthetic a priori truth (SAPT) is a true statement, obtainable without the corresponding experience and not obtainable by only analyzing the meaning of the words. You ask ...
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Are mathematical objects a type according to type-theory?

How does one perform operations on types? I will create a partial answer: (a): first, there are many type theories. So, lets fix one, perhaps Martin- Lof's. So we gain access to, say, function types, ...
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Are mathematical objects a type according to type-theory?

Short Answer Only if one wants to simulate mathematical objects with software. To philosophers, mathematical objects are not a species of type, rather types are a species of mathematical object in the ...
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Is "there are synthetic a priori truths" a synthetic a priori truth?

Although Kant does not have the clearest account of some of these propositions in his system, I think he could have formulated them (if the question of their "existence" is posed) in an ...
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-1 votes

Is "there are synthetic a priori truths" a synthetic a priori truth?

The answer seems in the positive to me, assuming Kant's position that there are synthetic a priori truths (e.g. 7+5=12). First, let's bring forth another answer's criteria for a synthetic a priori ...
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In Kant, what would happen if singular objects that we perceive in space didn't necessarily have the spatial properties that we perceive them to have?

Understanding Kant on pure intuition is difficut. And attempting to understand Paul Guyer's interpretation does not make it easier :-) Second, he is assuming that we can say of any particular object ...
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Who can really work on interpreting quantum mechanics and the standard model of particle physics?

Even people not familiar with interpretation of quantum mechanics can understand physicists are not interested in substance metaphysics. Your assertion appears to be contradicted by what physicists ...
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How do we answer the question of "what is it"?

1.) Before answering a ‚What is?‘-question it may help to clarify: Which type of statement would I accept as a satisfying answer? We are not familiar with objects like electrons, protons, positrons, ...
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Understanding the nature of units of measurement

The point of measurements is to make an objective judgement on a property of an object avoiding subjectivity (roughly). This might explain why comparing them is complicated. For example, imagine a ...
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Can metaphysics ever find real truth?

According to Immanuel Kant, what divides metaphysical knowledge from physical knowledge is experience. So, if you know something new by means of the senses (e.g. a rock, a rainbow, the smell of roses, ...
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Kant's Prolegomena Note I - Geometry being an objective representation of nature

Kant recalls his basic discrimination, opposing • D1: objects as they are in themselves • D2: the external appearance of objects. The external appearance of objects (D2) is the result of our ...
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Kant's Prolegomena Note I - Geometry being an objective representation of nature

This is the best I could come up with so far, I'm not sure it is correct: Kant seems to argue that, with P1 and P2, this is true: Representation of space and deductions from it may or may not be ...
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Understanding the nature of units of measurement

A measurement with units is not a counting of units, but a ratio to units. That is: 10 meters is that length which, divided by ten, is the length we call 1 meter. This for example lets us have things ...
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Understanding the nature of units of measurement

Scales of measurement are always conventional: arbitrary, but systematic and functional. They are usually organized into a few types: Categorical: individual, indivisible objects sorted into groups, ...
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Understanding the nature of units of measurement

You "pencils" example appear to use pencil itself as the unit. This is somewhat workable in English because English omits the unit for countable objects, and as a result, leaves some open ...
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Kant's Prolegomena §13 - triangle example argument

A coordinate is not an intrinsic property of a given point of the spheric triangle. It is a means that we use to locate points on the sphere. The intrinsic properties of a spheric triangle are the ...
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Why is the argument from synthetic a priori cognition to the subjectivity of what is cognized independent of the "appearance" premise?

Upon writing this question and thinking about it, I could only come to one hypothesis, although I'm not so sure of it: The "argument" itself mentions "sensible representations of ...
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What is a "Sache" in Kant's metaphysics?

There are two possibilities to take this: You can understand Sache as synonym for Ding, ie. in the sense of a representation of a particular object of experience, so that the translation thing is ...
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Can metaphysics ever find real truth?

I interpret your questions as follows: 1.) Do there exist true statements? A statement is true if it claims a matter of fact. Example: The statement ‚Now it rain at Boston‘ is true if and only if now ...
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In Kant, are "pure intuition" and "intuition a priori" synonyms?

To reinforce the claim, in Paul Guyer's Kant, these are the definitions of a priori and pure in its glossary: a priori: Known or formed independently of particular experience; non-empirical. pure (...
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In Kant, are "pure intuition" and "intuition a priori" synonyms?

„pure intuition“ = non-empirical intuition, intuition without object „intuition a priori“ = intuition which takes place before any intuition of an object I think that Kant uses both terms as synonyms....
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