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What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

In general, humans are curious. When we observe phenomena in the world, we want to know what causes them. This curiosity leads to research and development, and the end result has been our tremendous ...
Barmar's user avatar
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What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

With regard to the continuum hypothesis you mentioned, it is worth noting that there are indeed some mathematicians who view it as a kind of "metaphysical thing" as you put it. Solomon ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
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Is there a name for the place in the human mind for *not* knowing - a place of curiosity, anger, insecurity, the void we grow in to as we develop?

Baruch Spinoza describes a state of wonder which occurs when the mind seeks for knowledge, comes up empty, and then the search for knowledge comes to a stop. Zen includes the practice or contemplation ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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1 vote

Is there a name for the place in the human mind for *not* knowing - a place of curiosity, anger, insecurity, the void we grow in to as we develop?

I am surprised no one has mentioned the Greek aporia. It's there in Plato, Aristotle, Pyrrho. In particular, in Meno, Socrates reduces Meno to aporia (puzzlement, confusion) and then to (what is now ...
Rushi's user avatar
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Is there a name for the place in the human mind for *not* knowing - a place of curiosity, anger, insecurity, the void we grow in to as we develop?

I believe that the working mechanism of the human brain is not specifically designed to trigger certain emotions. The various emotions exhibited by humans and other animals are likely just active and ...
Mike Song's user avatar
2 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

Of course there is a reason. God is the main religious concept, and religion is a social institution of control and power. People defend the concept they were brainwashed with since childhood to keep ...
Groovy's user avatar
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-1 votes

I can't understand Schopenhauer on space

Schopenhauer said that everything in the world is a manifestation of will. In other words, everything we can feel is also superficial, and time and space are no exception. We can view time and space ...
Mike Song's user avatar
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How to interpret sleep in metaphysical solipsism?

The main reason is control, in solipsism because you are the only thing that exists you would want it to seem like you are the only entity with any sense of realness and so if you are real you should ...
How why e's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

You ask: What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things? Coming from a position heavily influenced by the linguistic turn, the existence of what might better be ...
J D's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

I will generalize your question a bit, hopefully this is still interesting to you too: If the outcome of a debate cannot possibly have an impact on my (our) lives, then why take part in the debate? ...
mudskipper's user avatar
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What is the use in arguing for or against the existence of metaphysical things?

Here are the main assumption(s) that some ppl break with: (a) Crucially, the notion of proof here is unclear: we can formalize definitions of free will, add an accepted formal system and suitably ...
emesupap's user avatar
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Books to self-study Immanuel Kant

It depends on whether you're interested only in Kant's practical philosophy or in his theoretical philosophy aswell. The former depends on the latter for justification, but deontology as such, or ...
abracadabra's user avatar
1 vote

Books to self-study Immanuel Kant

I will recommend a reading plan of the primary texts, so as to give an alternative to the answer and comments already here that suggest a more guided approach via secondary resources. The reading list ...
Matt Harper's user avatar
1 vote

Are explanations entailments?

You ask: Are explanations entailments? No, but may involve them. We can look to an explanation offered by W.H. Newton-Smith of why explanation may rely on entailment, but is not entailment itself. ...
J D's user avatar
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1 vote

Are explanations entailments?

Explanations are not entailments. For example - “Wind blows because fan is running.” Why wind is blowing can be explained by the fan’s motion but blowing wind does not necessarily entail a fan.
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
2 votes

Are explanations entailments?

If you are talking at such a very general level, then an explanation is just any more or less valid or reasonable response to a "why" or "how" question. If we generalize over all ...
mudskipper's user avatar
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Are explanations entailments?

An explanation definitely is an argument i.e. the explanans (that which is explained) is entailed by the explanandum (that which explains). The difference between an explanation and an argument is the ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
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Is the B-theory of time only compatible with an infinitely renewing cyclical reality?

According to the B-theory of time, the flow of time is an illusion, and every point in time exists equally. If this theory is accurate, then physical reality could potentially have an infinitely ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
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Is the B-theory of time only compatible with an infinitely renewing cyclical reality?

The B Series is just an abstraction created because McTaggart could not fathom the reality of the A Series. In The Unreality of Time McTaggart asserts a contradiction in the A Series For it assumes ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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Are explanations entailments?

I would say that explanation involves consideration of entailment, absolutely, but that does not mean that one system (X) entails another (Y), as in, if you have X, then you have Y, necessarily. (If ...
Reduct Blog's user avatar
2 votes

Is the B-theory of time only compatible with an infinitely renewing cyclical reality?

Is it mathematically plausible for an event to occur for the first time after an infinite interval has passed? Yes. Since we're talking about mathematics, not physics, consider an altogether ...
John Bollinger's user avatar
3 votes

Is the B-theory of time only compatible with an infinitely renewing cyclical reality?

While the other answers are very good, I disagree with some parts of them. I think it's worth focusing on this sentence: If time is infinite, it seems that an infinite sequence of events, including ...
redroid's user avatar
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How can we know if the Apollonian and Dionysian really exist?

Welcome to PhilSE. Are the categories emotional and rational "real", and do they have an empirical basis? What Is Reality Anyway? The first part is a very broad question, because reality ...
J D's user avatar
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2 votes

Is the B-theory of time only compatible with an infinitely renewing cyclical reality?

The interpetation of time as either "A" (all the physical stuff exists now in a 3-dimensional space, there is no actual representation of a "time axis", and everything moves around ...
AnoE's user avatar
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1 vote

How can we know if the Apollonian and Dionysian really exist?

Colorless green ideas sleep furiously Noam Chomsky Chomsky should be treated as a koan -- a theme of meditatation. What does it mean? What could it mean? How many layers of armor does it present you ...
Rushi's user avatar
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7 votes

Is the B-theory of time only compatible with an infinitely renewing cyclical reality?

No, an infinite sequence of events need not repeat, just as an infinite series of numbers need not repeat (e.g. the digits of pi). Your infinitely long rope example is obviously flawed, because we ...
Eric Smith's user avatar
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How is existence in presentism reconciled with relativity of simultaneity?

The problem goes away if one acknowledges "existence" to be conditional on time. That is, something can come into existence at one time, and later cease to exist. I think it's quite ...
Eric Smith's user avatar
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Descartes Statement in Second Meditation is illogical?

Althought not generally discussed in that context, Descartes has an occult side. You can read more on this in the book Descartes:An Intellectual Biography. A major part of his work is based on his ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
1 vote

Descartes Statement in Second Meditation is illogical?

You are on the right track in my view — Descartes is made too much of in western philosophy. Methodological doubt is all very well on the face of it, but Descartes never really gets out of his mind. ...
Rushi's user avatar
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-1 votes

Truthmaker Maximalism

You seem to have some false assumptions in your question: "since the absence of a truthmaker for proposition p is a truthmaker for proposition ~p" You are falsely assuming that all ...
polcott's user avatar
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Struggling to understand singluar things in Spinoza's Ethics Part II. How do they come to be?

I think your confusion is between finite modes/ideas and infinite modes/ideas. Finite modes and ideas are those that are perceived by the limited human mind. These are the ones that become particular. ...
Jun Dalisay's user avatar
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How is existence in presentism reconciled with relativity of simultaneity?

What relativity tells us is that 'now'- rather like 'here'- is an observer-dependent specification of location in spacetime. So if you want an answer to the question 'what is happening on Mars now?', ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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Can causality be translated into logical formalism to analyze it via mathematical logic?

Causality is an influence by which one event, process, state, or object (a cause) contributes to the production of another event, process, state, or object (an effect) where the cause is partly ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
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Can causality be translated into logical formalism to analyze it via mathematical logic?

A implies B - If A is true at time t, then B is true at time t. A causes B - If A had not been true at t₁, then B wouldn't have been true at t₂ = t₁ + Δt (Δt > 0). The human mind only has one ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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1 vote

Can causality be translated into logical formalism to analyze it via mathematical logic?

Non liquet but ... both logic and causality are understood/framed as this follows - (non) sequitur and post (hoc ergo propter hoc) - from that.
Hudjefa's user avatar
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Has Spinoza been disproved by modern physics?

I'm not a physicist, but I actually look into the Physics of Descartes and Spinoza. "Extension" is Descartes-speak for metaphysical space. "Space" is physical space. Spinoza's ...
Pantry Points's user avatar
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Is there a known limit to relationship between physics and mathematics?

There is an extremely popular notion that mathematical platonism (every mathematical object has a platonic existence) is well-defined. But that's false. Due to the incompleteness theorem, we know that ...
user21820's user avatar
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2 votes

Why expecting happiness while spending the least amount of effort rarely work in life?

We can definitely make a case for a materialistic explanation for what you are describing by thinking about entropy. Classic philosphers held happiness to stem from the state of Ataraxia, a state of ...
armand's user avatar
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1 vote

Why expecting happiness while spending the least amount of effort rarely work in life?

Seeing the poem in your answer (now deleted), I have a feeling you will relate to Gurdjieff. Here is an excerpt from "In search of the miraculous" — copied from here. There is an Eastern ...
Rushi's user avatar
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How do Thomists understand the efficient and final causes in planetary motion under Newtonian physics?

The final cause is the what-it-is-to-be-accomplished. The mathematical formula of Newton is an approximation of observable measurements; the mathematics have been refined/extended in general ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
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Can axiomatic (in-)dependence provide insights to the relation between natural and supernatural?

You say "dependent on the same axioms", but as I understand, theories in physics, biology, chemistry etc all have different axioms. You cannot describe nature with a coherent and unified set ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
2 votes

What do we mean when we talk about Aristotelianism?

Generally, as it has been pointed out, Aristotelianism encompasses all thought that features similar ideas. The general thrust in which the term is mostly used is, in my experience, as a metaphysical/...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it true that "What is supreme in a genus is cause of everything in the genus"?

This is the Aristotelian principle of teleology, the manifestation of which is enclosed in entelechy. Teleology is the explanation of phenomena in terms of the purpose they serve rather than of the ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
0 votes

What do we mean when we talk about Aristotelianism?

One could say that Socrates symbolizes the starting point of Western philosophy, although its roots go down to Pythagoras, Parmenidis and Heractlitus. In the same way we could say that Aristotelis ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
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How can objects be nonexisting?

As it was said above, the term 'exists' has different meanings. you don't need to appeal to mathematics to understand it, because - as I understand your question - you're not concerned with the ...
TRUTHS's user avatar
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3 votes

How can objects be nonexisting?

A square circle. Obviously, this is contradictory, but i feel odd saying it doesnt exist as well There is only one sense to the word "exist", so I can only be using the same sense ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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5 votes

How can objects be nonexisting?

The core of your difficulty- and of countless other questions on the same subject- is that you are confusing different senses of the word 'exist'. Your problem should go away if you separate the ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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2 votes

How can objects be nonexisting?

You can use Husserl to understand this: When we perceive, desire, or think, we always do so with reference to something. This means that thinking is always thinking-about-something. This "...
Ian's user avatar
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1 vote

Aquinas on the relation between essence, being, and existence

While @Ian answer is incredibly accurate, I would like to paint a similar yet differing view regarding the matter of esse as an effect of essence. First, to support his answer, we do see ...
Sebastianjoseph333's user avatar
2 votes

Can "Chance" be considered a metaphysic answer to the question of why evolution and similar happen to be?

The Human Observer recognizes patterns. Some patterns are classified as "deterministic". Some patterns are classified as "random". Some patterns are classified as "chaotic&...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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