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What's the difference between "emergence" and "reductionism"?

Emergence is a propensity of systems of matter and energy to interact in ways that lead to more-complicated systems or properties. Reductionism is a propensity of humans to try to analyse more-complex ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
1 vote

What's the difference between "emergence" and "reductionism"?

I’ll give the alternate view that reduction moves in the opposite direction of emergence, which seems obvious. Starting with physics, we can say that all things are made of particles, perhaps strings, ...
Matthew's user avatar
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0 votes

Why real distinction in God gives act and potency composition

If the perfections were really distinct, then it would be possible for them to subsist apart from each other. Then there could be a being with completely unsurpassable power, but which would lack ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes

Is there an evil god?

You are correct that the full Epicurean argument does not follow for a non-all-good deity. However, if the deity is all-powerful, then the standard argument against omnipotence is still viable; see ...
Corbin's user avatar
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-1 votes

Is there an evil god?

Yes, there is- according to Tom Waits, it's just god when he's drunk.
niels nielsen's user avatar
-3 votes

Is there an evil god?

​If 6 million Jews had to die in the Holocaust in order to create the first Jewish state in 2000 years, is it good or bad? It's neither, it is just a part of an absolute plan. On the other hand, the ...
TheMatrix Equation-balance's user avatar
1 vote

Is there an evil god?

This has been a problem many philosophers and theologians have considered over the years. I'll sketch some brief introductions to some classic arguments that I find personally persuasive. Note: For ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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3 votes

Is there an evil god?

Arguments against supernatural claims One of the main arguments against supernatural claims in general is a lack of good evidence supporting the claim. The principle of parsimony (or Occam's razor) ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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-2 votes

Is there an evil god?

what is the argument against the existence of an evil god? Isn't everything around us evidence for that argument? For example, don't you expect water to eventually boil if fire is put under it, ...
Julio Di Egidio's user avatar
1 vote

Is there an evil god?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dystheism Dystheism (from Ancient Greek: δυσ-, romanized: dus-, lit. 'bad' and θεός theos "god") is the belief that a god ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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3 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

In an aristotelician setting, and if understand your question correctly, this would be the case. For a property, Aristotle distinguishes between its potentiality and its actuality. Typically, as in ...
Johan's user avatar
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5 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

You consider the case that one moving ball hits a second ball at rest, and now the second ball moves while the first is at rest. This a standard experiment from mechanics and works best under the ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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2 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

In physics objects can have properties such as momentum and energy which can be transferred between objects when they interact. That does have a logical and experimental underpinning, which you can ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
0 votes

If X causes Y, where does Y gain its properties from? Are they transferred over from the cause X?

Suppose ball 1 collides with ball 2 which was at rest. Then, ball 2 starts to move too. But motion is relative, indeed "at rest" itself is a state of motion, and the actual physical process ...
Julio Di Egidio's user avatar
-1 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

For these type of questions about existence I find the proponents of Eleatic Monism (like Parmenides) had the most impactful and easy to understand wisdom. It is easy for humans to talk/speak in a &...
J Kusin's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

This has to be understood as a part of the linguistic turn, where classic philosophical problems were reconceptualized as problems of language. In this case, the fundamental question "What exists?...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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0 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

Quine's position is motivated by two considerations. One is a very hard-headed and pragmatic approach to philosophy. Quine advocates a strongly empiricist approach to philosophy that is minimalistic ...
Bumble's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

According to your summary, Quine did not propose the answer "Everything there is" (which would be circular), but rather the answer "Everything". This may be initially plausible ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
  • 1,149
1 vote

How to not fear the supernatural?

I am a bit psychotic (and a bit autistic), and I have at periods suffered from severe panic attacks: not a rational fear, whence rationalization can't help, it was/is a purely visceral thing. Namely, ...
Julio Di Egidio's user avatar
0 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

The standard treatment is to have them speak to a religious authority, who consoles them and assures them that it’s only a misinterpretation of normal anxiety symptoms as being caused by a deity, that ...
jpmc26's user avatar
  • 147
7 votes

Is it true that no philosopher disagrees that everything exists?

Quine is simply presenting a definition of 'everything'. Think of it this way. If I ask 'what is there?', a correct but unhelpful answer is 'whatever there is'. You cannot disagree with that answer, ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
2 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

The big picture of reality is stuff spread in space with persisting traits we identify with laws of physics. The stuff seems to be made of a small range of common building blocks which interact in set ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
-1 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

The nature of reality is The Great Mystery. The map (what we know about reality) is not the territory (what exists as reality). But some philosophers argue that their map of reality is the territory!
SystemTheory's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

The issue here is not that there is no answer, but that there are many, incompatible answers. This is one of the core questions that tends to define a particular philosophical outlook and commitments. ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 29.4k
2 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

I would suggest Kant's version of reality; the sum of possibilities. Reason being, for example: when walking around, about to turn a blind corner, I am on the lookout for any speeding cyclist, roller-...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

Metaphysics is supposed to answer the question "What is the nature of reality?" Reality is by definition all that there is, so nature is part of it presuming it exists, if so then there ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 6,794
3 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

The short answer is “42”, see the end of chapter 27 from the book Douglas Adams: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. The short answer indicates: Just asking for the nature of reality is possibly not ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 28.4k
2 votes

What is the nature of reality? Metaphysics: so the answer will "explain the essence of things and the principles that organize existence"

"What is the nature of reality?" In contrast, a saying from Nolan's Westworld: "What is the nature of your reality?" Asking the question leads us on to 'Know Thyself' which is, ...
Mark_NoBadCake's user avatar
2 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

This is philosophical only at the very beginning, and not new to you: You know it and I know it — there is no such deity. It is only in your head. The remainder of this post is advice following from ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
2 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

OMG (pun fully intended) aren't the ancient religions good at doing this to you? I have no more wisdom than the next guy but do consider these few things that have helped me, I also suffer PTSD and ...
Absinthe's user avatar
  • 161
3 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

Having not experienced PTSD myself, nor worked with people afflicted by it, nor suffered religion of any kind, I can still offer this attempt: In my personal experience, based on being somewhat past ...
AnoE's user avatar
  • 2,403
2 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

The Bhagavad Gita, a sacred Hindu text, offers insights that might help in addressing this situation. While it doesn't directly address post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or scrupulosity, it ...
user2725107's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How to not fear the supernatural?

Cognitive bias Recognising our cognitive biases can help us deal with fears of things that don't seem to exist. A bias towards unjustified fear helped us in ancient times, so evolution selected for ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 7,117
4 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

I deal with something very, very similar, where I fear the existence of hell given the religion that I grew up in. I grew up Muslim and came across seeming coincidences that seem extremely hard to ...
Baby_philosopher's user avatar
3 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

Here is how I see it. When life delivers a punch, for whatever reason, or probably just by accident, we might develop this idea of the world being a dangerous place, populated by people who don't care,...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
7 votes

How to not fear the supernatural?

Considering you are aware you need professional help, please take this speculation with a skeptical and critical mind. In order for this question to belong to this Philosophy group, I would formulate ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,106
7 votes

How could we have defined time, had matter in our universe not been atomic?

A few observations... A second is a unit of time, not time, so the definition of a second is not a definition of time any more than a kilogram is a definition of mass. The advantage of using atomic ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
4 votes

How could we have defined time, had matter in our universe not been atomic?

People have had measures of time long before we knew about atoms. Atomic theory came about around the 18th century, but sundials date back to 1500 BCE, and we were able to roughly determine time of ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 7,117
0 votes

Regarding objects being concrete and properties being abstract

In contemplation of subjects revolving around our senses, our perception, reality and our ability to interpret it usefully, I like to keep in mind that the old gents in togas that began the journey ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
0 votes

Regarding objects being concrete and properties being abstract

I actually believe there's layers, and each layer is built on something different. I believe the thing we have the most direct access to is our own mind, our own thoughts, which is not concrete. I ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 892
0 votes

Is there anything more fundamental than quantification?

Yes, there is. Observations or, more generically, perception. These are a prerequisite for quantification. They can be fooled, yes. Hence, we usually correlate these with more than one sense (touch ...
Marxos's user avatar
  • 768
1 vote

Why do realists insist that universals EXIST?

Thank you for your intriguing... Thought Experiment You posit: Consider a universe of size 10×10×10. Let there be 10 identical apples and 10 identical rods in it. Realists insist that not just 20 ...
Rushi's user avatar
  • 2,074
0 votes

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

Probabilities (causality odds) are a conserved quantity, from an information science standpoint.
niels nielsen's user avatar
2 votes

Is there anything more fundamental than quantification?

I wasn't going to respond, however: It is difficult metaphysically to draw the line between what is a property and what is an object. Some people argue yes. If existence is an abstraction and not ...
J D's user avatar
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4 votes

Is there anything more fundamental than quantification?

Existence as a subject of which other things are predicated, vs. as a predicate of other subjects, is where the role of the (mostly classical, even so) subsistence relation comes in to play. That is, ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
8 votes

Is there anything more fundamental than quantification?

What is most fundamental to a logic is the set of mechanical procedures by which we may derive theorems in the logic; the inference rules. These procedures are not specified within the logic. The ...
causative's user avatar
  • 11.8k
1 vote

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge?

Your suggested tabular map of fundamental categories of cause doesn't seem to map to your headline question about knowledge in any obvious way, but that could be my inability to make sense of your ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
1 vote

Do descriptions of what exist map to causes recognized by Man? Can we describe coherent models for broad patterns of knowledge?

Your question is probing the problem that under physicalism, neither psyche nor morality are causal. This leads to the denial of free will by most physicalists, and also two ways to conclude that ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 11.9k
1 vote

Under what conditions could all of reality be reduced to a formal system?

None. Uncertainty arises whenever we attempt to model outcomes in general as the product of a specified deterministic process. Chaos theory takes a deterministic system which is characterized as ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
  • 1,287
1 vote

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

'Causality' is really just a way of constructing narratives, and we tend to like doing that about subjects. Physics often has situations where multiple outcomes could happen, like systems with high ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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