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Stuart Hameroff's site "Quantum Consciousness" may provide a source of publications related to this topic. In the overview Hameroff writes: On the other hand, spiritual and contemplative traditions, and some scientists and philosophers consider consciousness to be intrinsic, ‘woven into the fabric of the universe’. In these views, conscious precursors and ...


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There's a modern version of the argument, from Kripke in Naming and Necessity. The idea is that identity is a necessary relation, so that if x = y, then necessarily x = y. Put in the language of possible worlds, we can say that in every possible world, x exists if and only if y exists, and in every possible world where they both exist they must have exactly ...


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What a wonderful contribution in the philosophy of technology. Let's see if we can't provide some clarification of this philosophical topic. INTRODUCTION From the article you cited: Virtuality is the cultural perception that material objects are interpenetrated by information patterns. So the first thing to be understood about her "virtuality" is that ...


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I think there are two possible positions here: 1) Two-way epiphenomenalism, i.e., the mind has an effect on (some region of) the brain while (some, potentially different, region of) the brain also has an effect on the mind. This seems to be the position you are suggesting. But I would say this is not really epiphenomenalism in any meaningful sense anymore....


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Your question, essentially how do we bridge the gap between the physical and mental is the central theme of Cartesian duality also known as the mind-body program. It is related to several other important ideas, like the proposed hard problem of consciousness and the problem of other minds. This basis for this line of philosophical inquiry has been going on ...


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I see the Private Language argument as the best way to dismiss solipsism, and to establish that truly private experiences are not coherent - though considering non-social adaptively intelligent animals seems to indicate limits to that (in the sense of language as conceptual abstracts, but not in the sense of a shared cognitive/evolutionary space of mutual ...


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The octopus is probably quite a good model. It is included among the sentient creatures in the Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness, which states that; “The absence of a neocortex does not appear to preclude an organism from experiencing affective states. Convergent evidence indicates that non-human animals have the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and ...


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Current physics is obviously incomplete or incorrect. It does not predict the existence of consciousness. But we know consciousness exists. Plus we have the known problems of unifying QM and general relativity. So of course we need new physics because the current physics does not explain the whole world. Consciousness is a part of the world.


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Metaphysics can be understood as dealing with what is common in the (empirical) sciences in a generalizing manner. Whereas biology deals with objects like cells, physics with atoms, chemistry with elements and mathematics with sets or numbers, metaphysics asks what it means to be an object at all and discusses our limits in understanding objects in general....


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You don’t need to practise mindfulness all the time. Try putting aside a regular, say, up to 20 minutes, up to twice a day for it. Less if that’s all you can manage. Plus, if particularly worried or stressed, a brief extra few minutes now and again. If uncomfortable thoughts come, let them come - and then let them go, don’t suppress them. And let your mind ...


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Both spirituality and metaphysics share a focus on transcendental (Kantian a priori) objects or concepts. The primary difference between the two is that: Metaphysics deals with one naturalistic transcendental being — the human subject — and its relationship to objects, other human subjects, and abstract concepts. Spirituality presumes one, or several, or a ...


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I'm not a dualist, so bear that in mind, but I can see a couple of immediate logical objections to Carroll's argument. First — and perhaps this is an unfair critique, even if accurate — Carroll is using a straw-man representation of religious beliefs. The idea of a 'personal' (identity preserving) soul that exists entirely separate from the physical plane ...


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It is not possible to tell something objective about the "feelings" of a non-human entity due to multiple reasons. First, the concept of feeling is the result of a set of subjective experiences. Even if you agree about the meaning of pain with another human being, the concepts behind are completely different. Each one develops an idea of what it does mean ...


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Welcome, Johnson Zhou. Assume for the sake of argument that your consciousness is a product of your body. Then assume also that you are Mr X. If Mr X is cloned down to the state of each particle, then Mr Y is created with a quantitatively different body - it can be individuated from yours in space/time - but a qualitatively identical consciousness. Mr X's ...


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Physics as currently taught and practiced does not explain the mind. Questions like this are outside the traditional domain of physics. It is possible for physicists and nonphysicists alike to speculate on explanations for the mind but there currently are no tools in the physicist's toolbox which would equip him or her to determine what it is.


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Newton had shown with his colour circle that the colour of a light is the way in which we perceive the overall balance of a set of spectral components or "rays" that individually appear other colours. Whitish orange as a colour of light is our perception of a particular overall balance, but tells us nothing about which specific "rays" (wavelengths) are ...


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Strawson has worked extensively on this problem of existence of others' minds. He first lays down his criteria of existence: Strawson lays down the principle that one can ascribe experiences to oneself only if one is prepared to ascribe them to others. This is because a subject can meet this requirement only if they are able to pick out other subjects, ...


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How can we describe consciousness Perhaps a better question is: What is consciousness or What am I I see many answers here which do not stem from a direct investigation of consciousness, but from mind and what the Ego thinks consciousness is. Those are doomed to be theoretical and full of errors, since the mind is not infinite enough to grasp something ...


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