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8

I'm far from an expert on the matter, but here's my take: Overall, myths play a very large role in Plato's writings, and it seems to me that the closing myths serve as a sort of "Noble Lie," a concept discussed in The Republic. For example, the myth of Er in The Republic likely does not represent Plato's view on the matter (the myth being fairly arbitrary ...


7

Levi-Strauss is an obvious reference even if it is not exactly clear what we speaking about. La pensee sauvage proposed "bricolage" as a practical form of mythology in contemporary societies. Within the general framework of economy, re-using things, that have already been used and thus carry signification, is according, to him, a form of mythology. So a ...


6

Whatever the reason was it had nothing to do with availability of translations, see Huss's survey Translations of the Zohar: Historical Contexts and Ideological Frameworks. Large parts of Zohar appeared in Latin in the second volume of the highly infuential book Kabbalah Denudata (1684) by the Christian Kabbalist Knorr von Rosenroth. First English ...


5

I believe there are many, a few quite well known. I'll just run through several, without attempting to define mythology, a la Barthes, or differentiate it from comprehensive ideology. One of the earlier and most fascinating is "The Oldest System Program of German Idealism," retrieved from dusty archives. It is believed to have been written by Schelling, ...


5

Quine famously drew a comparison between mythology and science as being different only in degree, not in kind. In his 1951 paper "Two Dogmas of Empiricism", he states: As an empiricist I continue to think of the conceptual scheme of science as a tool, ultimately, for predicting future experience in the light of past experience. Physical objects are ...


4

According to the philpapers survey, 78% of the participating philosophers said they accept or lean towards atheism. 14% accept or lean towards theism, and the rest went into 'Other' with 12.6%. You can find the survey here: https://philpapers.org/surveys/results.pl


4

Disclaimer: I am a student and not a scholar of Plato at this point. I started reading his works in the order of the canon of Thrasyllus and only just finished Pheado myself. According to G.M.A. Grube's introduction to Pheado the myth at the end ought to be compared to the ones in: Gorgias Republic Phaedrus (Socrates' second speech) The connective tissue ...


4

As the Greeks moved from a mytho-poetic cosmology to one focused on rational enquiry, were there general philosophical ideas that arose, and that would have proposed and made convincing the case for a spherical Earth? Yes: observation. The sight of ships appearing on the horizon (masts first) makes the curvature of the earth evident. I think a better ...


3

Paul Ricoeur considered narrative discourse philosophically as a form of extended discourse. Metaphorical discourse would be another form. David Pellauer and Bernard Dauenhauer contrast metaphor used by Ricoeur with logical propositions. Live metaphors are the product of sentences, not the result of substituting one word for another for decorative or ...


3

In Ancient Greek religion gods are part of the cosmos, the world. They are supe-humans (like super-heroes with super-powers) and immortals (Chronus swallowed is children, but Zeus released them opening Chronus' stomach) but they live in the world and interact with humans. And they produce natural events : storm, war, etc.


3

Plotinus' relation to Plato seems straightforward but is not. But that he has some relation to Plato, that he treats Plato frequently as a touchstone, is clear. Jewish influence on Plotinus' thought, via Philo, is a possibility for which I can only give references. Plotinus and Plato E.R. Dodds sets out the seemingly straightforward relation as follows : ...


3

This is only a partial answer presenting some doubts that Plotinus was attempting a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist traditions of monotheism. Plotinus’s monotheism would come from the introduction of the One through what Dominic J. O’Meara calls the "Principle of Prior Simplicity", that is, “the idea that everything made up of parts, every composite ...


2

I'm personally sympathetic to the idea of Egyptian influence on Greek philosophy. But the problem with using Plato as evidence for anything is that he is officially on record as endorsing the creation and promotion of wholesale fictions in the service of higher truth --his (in)famous concept of the "Noble Lie" as introduced in the Republic. He also seems to ...


2

I get the feeling that there are no subsititutes for mythology, even in contemporary settings. First, one has to think about the time and the people that committed themselves to destroy myth, the moderns. Thinking of a modern setting brings forward the question of what is modernity, when did it start and when did it come to an end. The term "modern" was ...


2

I was just reading about gnostic syzygy https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeon_(Gnosticism) This is a kind of cosmic cosmogeny, a how things came to be as they are. That is absolutely a part of philosophy, though more associated with theology. In Hinduism for instance there is https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Yantra which is theological/spiritual, and I ...


2

From 'The Dionysiac World View', which is a kind of commentary on BN it appears that Greek tragedy on Nietzsche's view arose from the conjunction, the fusing in creative conflict, of the Apollonian and the Dionysiac. Both mentalities had existed separately but 'at the moment when the Hellenic "Will" blossomed' and this conjunction occurred, tragedy was born. ...


2

Welcome to PSE. Left to myself I should say that non-contextually hope is neither good nor evil. Let's get hope into conceptual focus. (1) If I hope for something then I must, under some description, desire it. I can't hope for something I don't in any respect want. (2) To hope for something, rather than merely to wish for it or day dream about it, I ...


2

In my and others philosophical view hope is for the weak, so yes, overall it's something not really helpful. We have various hope-related situations. In one situation, you did everything you could and still some things did not get the way they suppose to. In this case hope can indirectly have good effects because it can help maintain a positive attitude. ...


2

Box is a mistranslation. Pithos is an Ancient vase not a box. However vase is a metaphore. Its shape and use as container refers to pregnancy. Pandora’s name is also not understood, but as she was interpreted by the church to be equal to Eve, her name can be understood as to come fro. από άνθρωπο (from man) which has a similar meaning as the Biblical story ...


1

The following site came from doing an internet search on "Greek gods list": The Greek gods page claims to be "A Complete List of Greek Gods, Their Names & Their Realms of Influence". I counted 62 on the list. There is also a page on goddesses.


1

Short answer: Plato used mythology as a vehicle for philosophy. You see it as far back as Hesiod in the Greek canon. The Old and New Testaments also fit this mold. Here's where I find the mythological aspects useful. In regard to the New Testament, where we seem to get into trouble is in interpreting the words of the text (many interpretations can be ...


1

It appears that there exists a strong link between Hindu philosophy and Hindu mythology. The following material produced by an important literateur Shri Bankim Chandra Chatterjea , may be of interest. The relation of Hindu Philosophy to Hindu Mythology.—A sort of hazy perception that Hindu Mythology is in a great measure the parent of Hindu Philosophy ...


1

While it is difficult to put a firm date on it, more and more philosophers became atheists with the dawn of the scientific revolution and the subsequent waning of the Catholic Church's influence over philosophical thought. Some may date this as early as the 1500s or later (1700s). Suffice it to say that as science grew so did an atheistic outlook from ...


1

Have any philosopher considered, for instance, "Christian theology" as being "Christian mythology", i.e. have any philosopher called the god from the Bible a myth, like Odin, Zeus or Huangdi? Yes! I think it would be about right to say that the perennial philosophy treats Theology exactly as myth. It would have value and meaning but uses words to point ...


1

I think Joseph Weissman has already given one possible answer, Nietzsche. If the only Christian died on the cross, where does that leave Christianity? As myth. And not just as a Christian myth, but as already parasitical of Greek myth. Jesus is clearly acting out the part of Dionysus. The plot-scheme of the four Gospels is soaked in wine, and Jesus ...


1

Myths, as far as they have true believers, come and go I think, even without the "help" of something like modernism. And modernism has it's gods: the rich and famous usually,who we may dream live in their own Valhalla, free from all worry and care. We know better, but still the vision of this is enticing. Heidegger said that only a god can save us. This ...


1

The correct answer is B: B: call both "religion", but polytheism/mythology a subset of all existing religions. There are several established and historical religions which are polytheistic. Notably, in modern times, some schools of Hinduism and Buddhism (e.g. Tibetan Buddhism), and Shintoism (the traditional religion of Japan) among others are ...


1

Mythoi and logoi - myths and rational discourse Certain myths will not be allowed in the kallipolis, the ideal state or polis of the Republic. But the Republic itself ends with the deep and complex Myth of Er; myths also figure prominently in Phaedo and Gorgias. (This is not a complete list.) Julia Annas offers illuminating remarks on the myths and their ...


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