6

The claim that Hegel stands in any line at the start of which is Plotinus looks highly suspect to me. I make just two points. In the first place, Hegel's Absolute or God, or One if one chooses that terminology, has an inescapably historical dimension. The Absolute develops through time, seeking ever more adequate modes of expression and embodiment, ever ...


5

"alive" is an (unhappy) metaphor for "active". The three pinciples of Plotinus' ontology : the One, the Intellect and the Soul, are active powers: they produce reality. See Lloyd Gerson, Plotinus, Routledge (1998), page 2 : First, they [the ἀρχαὶ (archai)] are principles of explanation or starting-points for solving the inventory of ...


3

No, Platonic forms are not alive; a neoplatonist distorsion may entertain such a view, and if one is careful enough the assertion that 'neoplatonic forms are alive' might be made accaptable. Without verbal acrobatics or violence done to language one cannot accommodate 'unchanging', the defining character of forms, and 'alive'. (divine contradictoriness ...


3

It's hazardous to say anything about Plotinus. I cannot speak from expertise but as I understand Plotinus, there are three hypostases : the One (hen), Intelligence (nous) and the soul (psuche). The One is beyond the Forms. But Intelligence possesses the Forms as attributes. This is where I see the major difference from Plato. Plato's Forms are in no ...


3

The beautiful, the true, the good, the just - they are the typical ideas which Plato uses to illustrate his theory of forms. The only candidate I know from Plato for identifying the beautiful (kalon) and the true (alethes) is Symposion 212a. On the other hand, in Symposion Plato often combines the beautiful and the good (agathon). For the closest ...


3

Plotinus' relation to Plato seems straightforward but is not. But that he has some relation to Plato, that he treats Plato frequently as a touchstone, is clear. Jewish influence on Plotinus' thought, via Philo, is a possibility for which I can only give references. Plotinus and Plato E.R. Dodds sets out the seemingly straightforward relation as follows : ...


3

This is only a partial answer presenting some doubts that Plotinus was attempting a synthesis of Jewish and Platonist traditions of monotheism. Plotinus’s monotheism would come from the introduction of the One through what Dominic J. O’Meara calls the "Principle of Prior Simplicity", that is, “the idea that everything made up of parts, every composite ...


2

Personally I would recommend that you read middle Platonists like Galen. The thing to keep your eye on is the relationship between psychē, pneuma, and sarkos as it developed in later Hellenistic philosophy, and the corresponding beast - man - daimon series. Understanding the problem (in classical Greek psychology) that this is supposed to solve will vastly ...


2

Given that Christianity borrowed a lot from neoplatonism (works of Iamblichus of Chalcis: Theurgy of the Soul, Egyptian Mysteries, Letters), and openly harvested other traditions as a religion that was conjured at the Council of Nicea for the purpose of amassing political power (letters of Constatine I to the Bishops), reading any works antedating it is ...


2

I rather incline to think he was. The language of 'transcendence' and 'immanence' comes later but Plotinus' One covers both aspects in a way not to be found in Plato, Aristotle or the Stoics. If we identify the One with God then there is a plain sense in which God is transcendent. The One is the supreme principle or cause. It is, like Plato's Form of the ...


1

One of the biggest differences is that Neoplatonism, at least in its early forms, does not personify the divine. We may identify God the Father with the Neoplatonic "One," but in doing so, we either have to attribute a persona to the abstract singularity that is "the One," or we have to deny the personified descriptions of God the Father ...


1

Perhaps on a basic level at birth the body descends from the body of the mother into the soul (air). So literally plunging the body head first into the soul. The moment of breath is the moment of birth. The words are cognates. And that is not a coincidence.


1

One cannot read everything nor does reading something mean that one understands what one has read. To make sure the reading that one does involves the best understanding it is useful to focus on introductions of these peripheral works, focusing on the selections of the originals referenced by the authors of these introductions. In the case of the study of ...


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