12 votes
Accepted

Are there any prominent modern philosophers with a background in neuroscience?

At least the following researchers have a solid background in both philosophy and neuroscience: Patricia Churchland Paul Churchland Gerhard Roth Besides their personal homepage I recommend the book ...
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6 votes

Can physical aspects of the brain reveal everything about what one's subjective experience is like?

You are asking one of the outstanding unknown questions in philosophy: do mental states supervene on brain states or not? "Supervene" is a really great word. If A supervenes on B, it means that if ...
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5 votes

What counters are there to Spinoza's argument that acts of free will create infinite regress?

The meta-argument you attribute to Spinoza is closely related to the rule-following regress considered by Wittgenstein in Philosophical Investigations. To apply a rule in a particular situation we ...
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  • 40.7k
5 votes

Shouldn't philosophy be replaced by neuroscience?

"Science says the first word on everything, and the last word on nothing." - Victor Hugo Neuroscience may eventually replace or redefine large portions of what was historically referred to as the ...
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  • 722
4 votes

Shouldn't philosophy be replaced by neuroscience?

I like jobermark's argument, so I will not repeat it but take it further. It reminds me of a Richard Feynman quote, which we could paraphrase: neuroscience is as useful to philosophers as ornithology ...
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  • 264
4 votes

What has modern Neuroscience contributed to philosophy of mind (as opposed to science in general)?

The link between philosophy and science is not so straightforward, it is rarely possible to say that some scientific developments are directly responsible for some specific philosophical developments. ...
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4 votes

How might studying philosophy impact your mental health?

PATRICIA TURRISI, 'The Problem of the Philosophical Person', The Pluralist, Vol. 4, No. 1 (SPRING 2009), pp. 68-76, deals with the 'madness' of Socrates and William James. But it's an article, not a ...
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3 votes

If two brains A and B were 100% identical, why would A's self-awareness emerge in A instead of emerging in B and viceversa?

"If two brains A and B were 100% identical, why would A's self-awareness emerge in A instead of emerging in B and vice versa?" Am I missing something? The answer seems trivial. Presumably the question ...
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  • 527
3 votes
Accepted

How might studying philosophy impact your mental health?

in psychology, philosophy or neuroscience who talk about why negative or obsessive thinking is bad for your mental health? In neuroscience this is correlated with activation of the https://en.m....
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  • 10.8k
3 votes

According to Chalmers, can neuroscience resolve the "hard problem of consciousness"?

Short Answer In his paper, Chalmers answers you directly himself, p.10: We have seen that there are systematic reasons why the usual methods of cognitive science and neuroscience fail to account for ...
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2 votes

Philosophy of the lymphatic system

A large portion of philosophy is concerned with knowledge or experience or mind, and has been for millenia. It's not that philosophy is invading biology, really; it's that biologists have ...
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2 votes

Philosophy of the lymphatic system

I hope you don't mind me saying this, but you're question made me laugh. Gastrointestiphilosophy - now there's a course I want to take! But seriously, branches and sub-branches of philosophy aren't '...
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2 votes

Shouldn't philosophy be replaced by neuroscience?

Neuroscience will not replace philosophy. Indeed, it will not even be very helpful for understanding psychology. Neuroscience is roughly about the structural and chemical properties of your brain. ...
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  • 7,053
2 votes

Meaning is in the brain, where else?

First, I would suggest that meaning is intersubjective; this gets away from the notion of Descartian subjectivity which is self-subsistent; requiring no other. This is Lacans distinct contribution to ...
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2 votes

Meaning is in the brain, where else?

If you are asking is the meaning in your head all in your head, then of course the answer is yes. (I'm going to leave aside the details of your formulation, because it is specific to a degree that ...
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  • 15.7k
2 votes
Accepted

What determines individual experience?

You're making a category error: you are defining "your experiences" as something disjoint from the physical processes that generate your consciousness. But, of course, if the physicalist view is ...
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  • 15.7k
2 votes

Shouldn't philosophy be replaced by neuroscience?

Neuroscience has the potential to answer robustly many questions that have been asked by philosophers--questions about the nature of perception, consciousness, intuitive morality, and so on. It calls ...
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  • 15.7k
2 votes

Are there any prominent modern philosophers with a background in neuroscience?

Catherine Malabou writes extensively on the intersection of neuroscience and philosophy, most notably in The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage and What Should We Do With Our Brain?. Her work ...
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2 votes

What is the connection between color qualia and color frequencies?

If by "experience" you just mean qualia then the "connection" is purely accidental. We do not need to compare qualia to agree to call the same objects "green", nor do we need it to associate them to ...
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  • 40.7k
2 votes

Can physical aspects of the brain reveal everything about what one's subjective experience is like?

When McGinn states that knowing everything about your brain tells us nothing about your mind, he is overstating the case: an advanced cognitive neuroscience should indeed be able to say something ...
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  • 2,669
2 votes

Can science prove or provide evidence that the brain is the source of the mind

Here is the question: But to what extent do you or philosophers believe (or disbelieve) physicalism because of evidence from science, or is it more from philosophical "evidence" and/or a ...
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2 votes

Can science prove or provide evidence that the brain is the source of the mind

Science can, in fact, provide strong evidence for that. We have a lot of very good information that shows very strong correlation between physical processes in the brain and how the mind works, but ...
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  • 180
2 votes
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How can we be accountable if we are chemically programmed?

Andrew Eshleman provides an answer to the first question: given determinism can we be accountable, that is, have moral responsibility. In keeping with this focus on the ramifications of causal ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Physical correlates of consciousness

Information, information that exists in the neural processes, is probably the physical quantity that correlates perfectly with consciousness. Consciousness is a very complex and dynamic entity: you’...
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2 votes
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Are neural correlates of consciousness and immortal souls compatible?

The simplest answer to this question is to remember that correlation does not equal causation. Neural correlates are exactly that: biological phenomena that correlate with subjective experiences of ...
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2 votes

According to Chalmers, can neuroscience resolve the "hard problem of consciousness"?

The Wikipedia page states (emphasis mine): The philosopher David Chalmers, who introduced the term "hard problem of consciousness,"[3] contrasts this with the "easy problems" of ...
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  • 2,985
2 votes

According to Chalmers, can neuroscience resolve the "hard problem of consciousness"?

Q: What exactly is referred to by the "hard problem". A: The hard problem of consciousness, according to Chalmers and the majority of philosophers that use this term, is the problem of how ...
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