15 votes
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What did Nietzsche and Marx think of each other?

Nietzsche mocked German idealists at length, but I think calling him a materialist is a bridge too far, same as for all his anti-Christianity it is not clear that he was an atheist. He inherited his ...
Conifold's user avatar
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13 votes

Nietzsche doesn't believe in free will nor in "non-free will". How come?

From a purely metaphysical perspective, Nietzsche is almost a hard determinist — there is causal order and free will is incompatible with it. The reason for "almost" is that he rejects as a ...
Conifold's user avatar
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12 votes
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What are some theories attacking postmodernism preserving objective truth and morality without assuming a God?

Short Answer How can one argue against postmodernism for objective truth and morality without assuming a God? Post-modernist claims of pure subjectivism are largely hype. It's has been joked that a ...
J D's user avatar
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11 votes

Are there arguments against Nietzsche's master morality?

I think there's two things to consider here. Before that, I'll just mention that as far as I understand Nietzsche "master-morality" is not all chosen over slave-morality based on a utilitarian ...
virmaior's user avatar
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11 votes
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Does Nietzsche's rejection of Socrates mean that he is a relativist about ethics?

I believe the Nietzsche's passage referred to is this one: "Socrates' decadence is suggested not only by the admitted wantonness and anarchy of his instincts, but also by the hypertrophy of the ...
Conifold's user avatar
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10 votes
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Trying to Understand Quote by Nietzsche

It's also important to remember that Nietzche's father was an ultra religious Christian and he would have no doubt been well familiar with Jesus' words from https://biblehub.com/matthew/26-52.htm "...
Theodore Van Rooy's user avatar
10 votes
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What does Nietzsche refer to with the "backworldsmen"?

I answer with the authority of being a native German speaker and having graduated in philosophy ;) Back-world is a bad translation here. Presumably, the translator has mistaken the term "...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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9 votes

What does Nietzsche mean by "blond beast?"

The "blond beast" is (probably) an actual lion This answer is based on my readings of Nietzsche translated into English, since I do not speak German. My analysis therefore relies on the ...
Ben's user avatar
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9 votes

Nietzsche's Death of God: Why Zarathustra?

Nietzsche himself talks about it in his auto-biography "Ecce Homo". He chose Zarathustra because he saw the real Zarathustra (Zoroaster) as being the first one to establish the moral system which ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
8 votes

Was Nietzsche making fun of the military mindset when he said "That which does not kill me, makes me stronger"?

"Out of life's school of war, what does not destroy me makes me stronger." -Maxim 8, Twilight of the Idols In the Preface section at the beginning of Twilight of the Idols, Nietzsche opens ...
Al Dnone's user avatar
8 votes
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What is "the Nietzschean criterion" in Camus' "The Myth of Sisyphus"?

The allusion to the expression "the Nietzschean criterion" is, I think, merely internal to the present text (The Myth of Sisyphus). It is not something we the readers are supposed to know if ...
Ram Tobolski's user avatar
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8 votes

Trying to Understand Quote by Nietzsche

It has to be read as poetic language. It's evocative, unsettling, and striking, rather than explicit. Fighting monsters making a hero monstrous is not an uncommon trope, for instance it can be found ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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8 votes

Nietzsche doesn't believe in free will nor in "non-free will". How come?

There is a Wikipedia article collecting different material of Nietzsche on the subject: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Nietzsche_and_free_will#:~:text=Nietzsche's%20analysis-,Power%20of%...
tkruse's user avatar
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7 votes

What did Nietzsche mean by monsters and the abyss?

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster." If you engage in any kind of activity, you begin to embrace the viewpoints and facts related to the ...
emononen's user avatar
7 votes
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Why does Nietzsche call Plato a bore?

Nietzsche writes in the second aphorism from the section What I Owe to the Ancients of his work Twilight of the Idols, or, How to Philosophize with a Hammer (1888): I am a complete skeptic about ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is Plato's Callicles an example of Nietzsche's Übermensch? Is the Epicurean hedonist?

Well, in some ways Callicles comes close. One easily recognizes some of the key themes of Nietzsche's master morality there: the strong dominate the weak by nature, laws protecting the weak are unfair ...
Conifold's user avatar
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7 votes
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Nietzche quoting Descartes... without source

Descartes' Meditations (1641), III.2 : illud omne esse verum, quòd valde clare & distincte percipio. John Veitch English translation of 1901 : all that is very clearly and distinctly ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
7 votes
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Nietzsche’s despising of the herd

The problem Nietzsche has with herd mentality is that it is unexamined. If one has examined ones own morality alongside the moral virtues of the herd, concluding that those herd moralities best suit ...
Gary's user avatar
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6 votes
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What does this quote of Nietzsche mean?

See Twilight of the Idols, or How One Philosophizes with a Hammer (Götzen-Dämmerung, oder Wie man mit dem Hammer philosophiert, August-September 1888) : The Probelm of Socrates : "The wisest men in ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
6 votes
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Was Nietzsche against hedonism?

Yes, Nietzsche would be against it. The crux of Nietzsche attitude towards utilitarianism/hedonism/"English psychology" in general is the problem of suffering. Nietzsche thinks it makes sense to ...
guest1806's user avatar
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6 votes
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Did Nietszche say "all human institutions are intended to prevent mankind from feeling their life"?

The answer to the title question is: Yes (kind of)! Well, I'd translate differently. Actually, the "quote" in that book is a very loose paraphrase: The original in German from his Untimely ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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6 votes

What are some theories attacking postmodernism preserving objective truth and morality without assuming a God?

To summarize an answer that became lengthier than I first intended: The woke and the fascists are both trying to bring about societal change away from the status quo as they see it. In that regard, ...
Flater's user avatar
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6 votes

Does Nietzsche's statement “God is dead” imply that morality ceases to exist?

God is dead can be taken to mean not that there are no moral values but that moral values are determined by people, not imposed upon them by a higher authority.
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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6 votes

I am struggling to believe there is anything good in humanity: can you help?

It doesn’t take much to see that humans are pretty cool members of the earth’s animal kingdom. We have complex speech, we can use tools, we can grow and dye our hair and clothing fabulous colours, and ...
Paul Ross's user avatar
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5 votes

Nietzsche and the abuse of power

'Strength' for Nietzsche' is strength to choose our own values. This strength is lost, or never possessed, if we have been infected by 'slave morality' as he calls it. Slave morality prescribes what ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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5 votes

Nietzsche's Death of God: Why Zarathustra?

As Alexander writes Nietzsche answers this question in paragraph 3 of the chapter "WHY I AM A FATALITY" from his work Ecce Homo: [...] but because of the more important fact that Zarathustra was ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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5 votes

What did Nietzsche and Marx think of each other?

I doubt there is any crossover whatsoever. Nietzsche's breakdown was in 1889. Marx died in England in 1883, and was not at all the most prominent socialist of that time. Engels completed Capital in ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar
5 votes
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Bad word choice in Nietzsche's "One thing is needful"?

One thing to always keep in mind: Nietzsche wrote in German. And referring to translations without double-checking (with the original language, if possible!) is always problematic. The original lines ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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5 votes

What does this quote of Nietzsche mean?

Nietzsche is talking about decadence, i.e., any approach to life, such as Christian morality, that leads to the decay rather than the flourishing of human beings. At the same time, he is commenting on ...
Richard Kayser's user avatar
5 votes

Why is Nietzsche more frequently associated with Nazis than Hegel is?

The actual answer rests with the words of Adolf Hitler himself. Hitler openly declared his hostility against Hegel, and Hitler openly declared that Nietzsche was his favorite philosopher. (See ...
Paul Trejo's user avatar

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