32

Yeah, unfortunately a lot of people misquote Nietzsche. It's kind of a recurring joke among those who are familiar with his work. For example, the phrase "God is dead" is often taken completely out of context and used to justify things that Nietzsche himself never intended. In this specific example, Nietzsche is not at all  endorsing the statement that ...


20

Nietzsche does explicitly name a few people in Will to Power  that he thinks rank among the greatest human beings that have ever lived, and he puts them in this category for traits very similar to those that he ascribes to an Übermensch: Systematic falsification of history; so that it may provide the proof of moral valuation: a. decline of a ...


20

First, it's important to avoid the not-so-uncommon misinterpretation that Nietzsche is saying God once was but no longer is: Nietzsche is definitely not saying that something happened to God as an entity (according to Nietzsche, God never existed), but rather that we have done something to God as an idea. Specifically, we have abandoned the idea of God, ...


17

An important thing to keep in mind when reading Nietzsche is that most of the time he is trying to reveal things through insights. The point of this particular quotation is to reveal the assumption at the base of many philosophies (in this case, most specifically positivism): that objective facts exist. Positivism holds, roughly, that the phenomena we ...


15

There's no evidence that Nietzsche read Kierkegaard; the latter had not been translated into German. However, there is strong evidence that Nietzsche knew of Kierkegaard through the secondary literature; furthermore, Georges Brandes was a clear link between the two of them. As you have noticed, there are certainly a lot of parallels between their thought, ...


15

Nietzsche has a tenuous relationship with free will. His theories here are fairly difficult, conceptually, to grasp, and I certainly won't claim that I have a thoroughly complete understanding of it. Also, it's worth bearing in mind that it isn't unheard of to find contradictions across Nietzsche's various works. Even putting aside the very late stage in his ...


12

Nietzsche mocked German idealists at length, but I think calling him a materialist is a bridge too far, same as for all his anti-Christianity it is not clear that he was an atheist. He inherited his metaphysics from Schopenhauer, transforming his World Will into will to power, who can be seen as irrationalizing Hegel's Absolute Geist with a side of that "...


10

I think there's two things to consider here. Before that, I'll just mention that as far as I understand Nietzsche "master-morality" is not all chosen over slave-morality based on a utilitarian calculation. Instead, it's that there's something disgusting about the way slave morality arrives at value, viz., in an external and ergo slavish way. First, slave-...


10

I believe the Nietzsche's passage referred to is this one: "Socrates' decadence is suggested not only by the admitted wantonness and anarchy of his instincts, but also by the hypertrophy of the logical faculty and that barbed malice which distinguishes him. Nor should we forget those auditory hallucinations which, as "the daimonion of Socrates," have been ...


9

To reformulate the question bit in more familiar terms: "Which type of argument is more robust to error: deductive or inductive?" (I'm not overly familiar with Nietzsche's work so I'm going to cheat and assume that since he stands against holding ideas a priori, he tends to reason from an inductive stance. I assume that's what you mean by "social analysis"...


9

If you think you'll manage reading Nietzsche himself, I would certainly recommend it - it'll give you a very direct image of his philosophy. I personally started with Beyond Good and Evil, and would recommend it as one of the first things you read; you will get right into Nietzsche's epistemology, his concept of will to power, and some fairly amusing attacks ...


9

From the outset, it's important to note the historical context of this quotation. It's virtually guaranteed that by "physics", Nietzsche is referring here to Aristotle's Physics, i.e. the study of all observable natural things. He's definitely not talking about theoretical physics as we know it today. I also think it's instructive to read this passage ...


9

Both Nietzsche's and Buddhist writings share the fact that they are a direct response to nihilism, however was he right in characterising Buddhism as advocating a negation of the will, as a will to nothingness, or was this a misunderstanding stemming from his reading of Buddhist texts through the works of Schopenhauer? I can speak less strongly to ...


8

A number of writers have commented on parallels in the projects of Sade and Nietzsche; I think that Adorno and Horkheimer's Dialectic of Enlightenment is probably the best known treatment of the subject. I also seem to remember Bataille writing about this, and it may come up in Lacan's Kant avec Sade-- but, to the best of my knowledge, no one has produced ...


8

You are asking a question with a bit of subtlety here. How much of mathematics consists of mathematical writing — that is, general attempts by the author to convey an idea (if only to themselves in the future)? And of course, what do you mean by art? Can Newtons Principia, for example, be considered an art object; or Einsteins papers? Undoubtedly ...


8

"God is dead" appears several times in The Gay Science, and again in Zarathustra. The first reference in TGS is: 108 New struggles.- After Buddha was dead, his shadow was still shown for centuries in a cave-a tremendous. gruesome shadow. God is dead;l but given the way of men, there may still be caves for thousands of years in which his shadow will ...


8

Nietzsche was contemporary with Maxwell, Mach and other very successful field-oriented theorists, and by some at the time, field theories were thought to be so incompatible with atomism that no one would ever take atoms seriously again. Boscovich's 'atoms' are suspended and independent, they never touch and are not truly solid, (like our modern atoms) as ...


7

Here's a website that collects a number of relevant quotes; but as you say, it is really a ubiquitous theme in Nietzsche's corpus-- in fact, Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, and The Antichrist consist of little else. There's also a fair amount of secondary literature on the subject-- you might want to start here, as this will provide ...


7

What did Nietzsche mean by accusing Christianity of slave-morality? “I finally discovered two basic types and one basic difference. There are master morality and slave morality. . . . The moral discrimination of values has originated either among a ruling group whose consciousness of its difference from the ruled group was accompanied by delight -...


7

It's arguably not possible to "fully" understand any great work of philosophy. In the Platonic tradition, in fact, the general assumption is that you are being pointed in the direction of things that can never be fully explained, communicated or apprehended. With that said, Plato is extremely readable if you get a good translation, and is an excellent ...


7

I feel as though you want an answer to this question that analyzes Nietzsche's work against Hegel's and shows how each one could be used to support Nazi ideology. However, I don't think that is the right way to answer this question. The reason that Nietzsche's work was appropriated by the Nazis more often than Hegel's was has nothing to do with the merit or ...


7

Descartes' Meditations (1641), III.2 : illud omne esse verum, quòd valde clare & distincte percipio. John Veitch English translation of 1901 : all that is very clearly and distinctly apprehended (conceived) is true. See also Principia Philosophiae (1644), Pars prima, XXX : omnia qua clare percepimus, vera esse.


7

The problem Nietzsche has with herd mentality is that it is unexamined. If one has examined ones own morality alongside the moral virtues of the herd, concluding that those herd moralities best suit one's life, one is not really following herd morality any longer. Instead I would say that the individual has chosen a set of moralities that happen to be ...


6

First I just want to gather together some of what we had discussed in comments: Your question seems to me to be basically one about Aristotle's idea of catharsis; note that this theory itself is responding to Plato's "indictment" of poetry and drama as dangerous influences on people's minds, because they inspire empathy with often violent and/or criminal ...


6

Abstract: Zarathustra addresses a ‘little old woman’. Everything about women, he tells her, has pregnancy as a solution. A man should be brought up for war and the woman for the recreation of the warrior. The woman’s task is to bring out the child in the man. The happiness of a man is ‘I will’, of a woman ‘he wills’. Her world becomes ‘perfect’ when she ...


6

He's talking about European Christianity and he is simply pointing out that European Christians did not abide by the ethics as professed by Christianity. They act as though 'God' is not alive. Unlike other prophets & demagogues who came to turn their attention back towards God, he declares God is dead. Taking this seriously means finding a new anchor for ...


6

Has anyone "merged" existentialist thought with the idea of absence of free will? Yes, Sartre. Sartre was a Marxist and he took up positions close to those of the Communist Party, though Marxist determinism was not easy to reconcile with the absolute libertarianism that was the keynote of existentialism. In an effort to resolve this tension he wrote a ...


6

The connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M....


6

There is a lot of room for flexibility in interpreting Nietzsche, and unfortunately I do not find him offering anywhere a single, positive characterization of truth and its status. However, I would not agree that, as the question puts it, “it is well known that Friedrich Nietzsche was very condemnatory of the objective truth.” Nietzsche certainly attacks ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible