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TO HIS SISTER Nizza, March 1885 ... It seems to me that a human being with the very best of intentions can do immeasurable harm, if he is immodest enough to wish to profit those whose spirit and will are concealed from him. . . . This question has been linked to your other post. Nietzsche clearly had a simple thought that has been ...


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As many philosophical statements are, this one isn't exactly written in the venacular. However, it is possible to reduce this grammar to point out who profits. "It seems to me that a human being with the very best of intentions can do immeasurable harm, if he is immodest enough to wish to profit those whose spirit and will are concealed from him." ...


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Let's run this by some of his themes. I think you see lots of 'No, but...'. The very notion of 'intrinsic value' is not going to apply to an enterprise intended to re-evaluate all values. If he did value that, he would have to try to take himself beyond that value. So to the extent this position has value, that value is changeable and not intrinsic. One ...


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The text near this quote seems unambiguous enough. This "almost new domain of dangerous knowledge" is Nietzsche's own conception about the Will to power. He acknowledges that the role of this (almost) new factor in human affairs has been revealed to him through psychology but makes (almost rightly) the claim "nobody had yet harboured the notion the ...


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Psychologists and psychiatrists working for money did not exist. The names did not even mean what we mean by them yet. So he has to have been talking of something else. It seems obvious that any idea that creates influence between people can cause infinite harm by aligning itself with principles or tenets that ultimately limit people and cause them to be ...


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