42

While I'm not entirely convinced of the premises of the question, in general people seek out philosophies that address conditions of life as they experience it. In the marketplace of ideas, a philosophy may thrive not as much because of its connection with deeper truth, but because of its connection with present conundrums. In light of that, I'd submit ...


37

I can think of 2 reasons: Naturalism is the philosophy most promoted in public schools. With some exceptions, people tend to stick with what they're taught in school. Believing in a supernatural being that loves us used to be a widely accepted and even promoted way to view the universe, even in schools. That is no longer the case. The new standard is to ...


28

The short answer is No. A slightly longer one is this; I know many atheists who lead highly moral lives, not because they believe they'll go to hell if they don't, but because they want to. On the other hand, how many Jihadists have strapped suicide vests on themselves in the firm faith that they will be rewarded in heaven? If I may be blunt, this argument ...


17

Jacob Ross, Rejecting Ethical Deflationism,' Ethics 116, 2006: 742–68 defines nihilism as : ▻ NIHILISM - DEFINITION '...the view that the notions of good and bad and of right and wrong are illusions and that, objectively speaking, no option or state of affairs is better than any other, nor are any two options or states of affairs equally good. Thus, while ...


14

I will focus on answering these questions in your addendum Is no view of the world any more legitimate than the other? Are Tolstoy’s beliefs any more valid than my own, even if I have less of a background in this philosophy? Or are they merely an interpretation of the world based on their own circumstances, as humans require explanations to things. If so, ...


13

I would say the answer is yes, but with the addendum that the faith need not be in god or a higher power. As we go through life we have faith that certain things will happen. The sun will rise, the rain will stop, etc. These seem so simple because we take them for granted. We do not know that the sun will rise tomorrow. It is totally possible (though ...


10

Yes, it does contradict itself. But that doesn't make it any less useful as a philosophical position as many nihilists will tell you. Nihilism may be better understood as an aesthetic rather than a properly mature philosophical position (which explains its singular attraction to certain kitted out in black adolescents). Consistency is not everything. After ...


10

I believe it is impossible. I recommend you read (if you haven't already) Descartes' meditations where he famously concludes I think therefore I am - http://www.sacred-texts.com/phi/desc/med.txt: Archimedes, in order that he might draw the terrestrial globe out of its place, and transport it elsewhere, demanded only that one point should be fixed and ...


10

Do I need faith not to slump into nihilistic despair? Is life as tragic as it's being painted out to be by these people? Tolstoy argues yes. Below is my attempt to explain his argument, since I think that is the best way to answer this question of yours. Originally he thought the purpose of life was to experience happiness, by which he seems to mean ...


9

Your position would be reasonable against the kind of absolute relativists and radical skeptics that you describe. Unfortunately, those are only convenient straw men that are easy to refute, which is good sport for didactic purposes. Philosophers who actually hold positions so caricatured are savvy enough to nuance them so as to make them immune to self-...


9

Is it really true that life is this bleak? By way of answering your question - no, this is not true. Life is neither bleak nor non-bleak, because neither life nor anything else (except for abstract ethical concepts) has any inherent ethical value. One says in philosophy that "ethics is freestanding", meaning that there exists no valid argument whose ...


8

If nihilism is more popular these days, I would argue this is because the ideas which guided people through life with certainty and optimism no longer enjoy a consensus. Nietzsche discussed the prospect of a post-religious world (God is dead, Will to power, Ubermensch), and was disgusted with the idea of an entire society driven by mass culture, which he ...


7

Most arguments are kind-of semantic. We use moral talk everyday, we often discuss moral issues and try hard to convince each others of our moral judgements by appeal to reason and facts, just as if something objective is at stake. A good meta-ethical theory must account for this aspect of common language. Perhaps the best and simplest explanation is moral ...


5

No, there is no contradiction. The apparent contradiction arises from an equivocation on “value.” The version of nihilism you express, that there is no value, makes the most sense if it asserts that there is no real value in the universe. When philosophers assert that position, that is typically what they mean. The alternative, that nobody values anything, ...


5

Unfortunately, I haven't found too many existentialist works with a nuts-and-bolts focus, so my recommended reading list is really short -- two books in fact. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl. Here, Frankl writes about finding our own meaning, and how meaning keeps us going on through the most difficult of conditions. His book begins with his ...


5

It is not an extreme form of nihilism to believe that there is no purpose for existence, that is just what nihilism is. Yes, it may be hard to believe, but nihilists really believe that there is absolutely no purpose or meaning to life. It does not logically follow from this belief that suicide is the only thing for a nihilist to do. In the same way that ...


4

There are primarily three non-theistic routes to try to defend moral realism. First, there's Mill. In your question, you seem to allude utilitarianism in stating "Believing in objective moral values might be a good strategy to maximize happiness" but then you kind of depart in suggesting that this would not make them true. For Mill, the word good means ...


4

According to a strict advaita vedanta view, a sub-school of the Vedanta school of Vedic or Hindu philosophy and religious practice, you are correct. It doesn't exist. The only thing that exists is Brahman, one without a second. Gaudapada's Karika chapter IV argues for its non-existence and gives non-scriptural logic as proof with no fall-backs to scripture. ...


4

Nihilism is not a single philosophy. “Nihilism” is used to describe any position in philosophy that supports there being nothing of a certain kind. It is used to refer to the views, among others, that: nothing exists, a position in ontology (see this article in the SEP) no compound objects exist, a position in mereology (see this article in the SEP) nothing ...


4

Nietzsche does not seem to rejoice in the reality of atheism in any of his works. He doesn't seem to regret it either (as it just is). As to nihilism, he saw it as a crisis, a crisis that must be overcome. As to Father Seraphim Rose, what he said about “true ‘existential’ atheism” might apply to Nietzsche as follows: Nietzsche had a burning hated for ...


4

Ahh, you are where I was a few years ago :) .. A good way to deal with nihilism would be to contrast it with the diametrically opposite possibility. A situation where there is perfect meaning to life, with perfect happiness, no sorrow or injustice, and where the progress of nature ensures this in every way. If you see the psychological issues humans would ...


4

The work of the thinkers and writers we typically classify as "existentialist" (although few of them loved the term), Kierkegaard, Sartre, Dostoevsky, Camus, de Beauvoir, and so forth, can be viewed as collectively comprising responses to the conditions of life and the basic metaphysical assumptions that otherwise lead to nihilism. So if you want to start ...


4

I find that most modern quirks can be attributed to globalism yes, but specifically the internet. The internet provides exposure to elements you usually would not see. If you are of the same mind as myself, you believe that people are a product of their surroundings. That is how patriots and ideological fanatics come to exist and how unique cultures are ...


4

This answer is just speculation Why it is popular: People enjoy it. They can act how ever they please because immorality is impossible. It also makes them feel intellectually superior with no more effort than understanding a short sentence. The brevity of the belief is important to the "nihilists" laziness of learning and so their intellect and wisdom can ...


4

The way paradigms shift quickly in modern times is likely even more a cause than an enabling factor. Whoever has seen multiple contradicting views on one matter being accepted, then debunked, as truths through their lifetime will eventually find it unlikely that "the next truth will be any different" - and at the same time, see "truths are multiple, ...


4

Yes, Nietzsche would be against it. The crux of Nietzsche attitude towards utilitarianism/hedonism/"English psychology" in general is the problem of suffering. Nietzsche thinks it makes sense to endure serious suffering (he himself had a congenital tumor near his eyes and during the periods when it would grow, he was in incredible pain) if you can "achieve ...


4

There are a few places one can go for quick online answers: Wikipedia, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. There are other places as well, but when these sources turn up in an online search they may be worth considering. Let's just consider what Wikipedia has to say about these terms. First, let's consider "...


3

Why is Absurdism against Nihilism? Absurdism, as presented by Camus in the Myth of Sisyphus, allows the individual to have belief systems. These belief systems are formed by consciously appropriating elements of preexisting philosophies. Also by observing the consequences of actions, a moral code can be built. I've not as well read on Nihilism, but I think ...


3

For Nietzche, happiness is a complex thing. Different shades of it have different meanings and can lead us to pursue opposite agendas. Cheer and gaiety, for instance, lead the opposite direction from contentment. One can will to power or lust after it, and those lead to real differences in strategy. Your view is close to Plato's. One way of looking at ...


3

You may want to check out Peter Rowlands' book and lectures, which describe how the universe and its physical laws can come into existence from nothing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2XdhzCORbo


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