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You’re assuming that simulation is a philosophically coherent category. It’s not. Few philosophers have taken up Bostroms notion of a simulation as a philosophically coherent thought. It’s science-fiction dressed up as philosophy, and for we know, that’s where Bostrom got the idea from.


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Stephen Houlgate ... puts forward the argument that Hegels Logic is to be seen as an ontology. But is this view convincing? Not only the logic, but also Hesiods Theogony, Genesis and the Tao begins with a similar principle of indeterminancy. So plenty of people (if not you or others) have found it convincing.


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The concepts 'cause' and 'effect' are predicated on the concept 'change': an 'effect' is a change in the state of an object brought on by a 'cause'. The concept 'change' implies at least two non-identical states for the object in question. ∴ Unless a single object can exist in two places, or otherwise maintain two non-identical states, change can only occur ...


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We can't scientifically determine causality's dependence on time until we can measure the smallest amount of time (if it exists). However, some quantum physicists believe quantum entangled particles interact instantaneously over large distances. Implying causality independent of time. According to some interpretations of quantum mechanics, the effect of ...


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Well it may be true and seems logical or sensible and as a matter... Of course, science can not touch upon everything there is and isn't and this leaves open nearly an infinity of chances (possibly, literally, an infinity of infinities^i) that there is a distinct personality that exists outside of time and within this being's "mind" exists the "our" ...


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Why do we expect symmetry? Because we see symmetry all around us: human faces have bilateral symmetry, as are their bodies; so are trees, and the leaves on trees show symmetry too. Since symmetry is all around us we get to expect it. Moreover, one can argue, that there is a metaphysical necessity of such, since a world without symmetry of any kind, would ...


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@conifold- Here is a Spinoza response to a question which tangentially resembles the one here. It concerns ideas which appear to have no reference in reality, in this case a series of rectangles which can be 'pictured' or imagined in the minds-eye' but which have no existence. Not sure I can make any realtime sense of this, any thoughts. Cheers, Charles M ...


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