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I haven't read through it but this book Interpreting Bodies: Classical and Quantum Objects in Modern Physics (hopefully you can check it out online) has a lot of essays on holism, especially Ch. 3 by Tim Maudlin Part and Whole in Quantum Mechanics How Einstein presents the clearest view of a certain kind of reductionism in a letter, how Einstein presumably ...


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It has been proven by Thomas Breuer that an observer from inside a system where he is properly contained, cannot know its full physical state, and as such, cannot make accurate predictions of its future. One can make a link with free will here: an observer cannot predict oneself, regardless of how good physical theories he employs. The proof is mathematical, ...


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Yes, exactly. It looks like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indra%27s_net A real problem is our intuition that 'true' always means getting to look behind the curtain - 'getting our homework marked by god'. When we think hard though, we find 'true' isn't IN the 'facts', it is IN the whole situation of evaluating them; and never stands separately from that....


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If an object exists (= exists physically) then one may create a name which refers to the object. The name exists mentally, it is a mental construction. If a name exists mentally, then it does not necessarily refer to an existing object. E.g. consider the name "Emma, the unicorn". Hence it is recommended to distinguish between objects and names. In ...


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We have sets of interactions. Unifying them into persistent units we call objects, is a process of mental shorthand to make predictions more tractable. There can be stable co-occurrences of the outcome of repeated interactions, that is all. Like 'chair', our definitions of objects are about use, modes of life, and about how something relates to us, rather ...


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