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Philosophy can learn how to reach the heart of people It is basically about how to write truth in a way that reaches and permeates the public sphere, connecting reason with aesthetics. Heidegger is deeply indebted to Hölderlin here and I'm surprised Badiou does not offer this obvious link himself. The main idea has been around since Hegel, Schelling, and ...


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'Rediscovery' I think clearly applies to: from Romanticism - which was far more dominant and lasting in philosophy in Germany than in England. John Vervaeke has a great lecture on Romanticism in the context of the history of philosophy, which was all news to me. I can't think of a figure like Goethe in the English speaking world, able to contribute ...


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Metaphysics has come to mean what can be known about the first principles of things through introspection, in the way mathematical idealists consider mathematics to be. Ontology, the nature of being, coming to be, and change, has always been a central metaphysical topic. Dreams have been a topic for philosophy since Zuangzhi in the 4th C. BC, who wondered if ...


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Of course it is -- sensory perception is data coming from, well, your sensors! You have microphones in your ears, your eyes are digital cameras (except their signals never digitized, so it's analog), you have pressure and temperature sensors in your skin, etc. They never stop streaming data to your brain. Are they real? Well, being electrical currents, they ...


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are those sensations real are they things in their own right? It seems contradictory to think that the physical world actually contains sensations do philosophers have a name for it? Descartes distinguished between extensible phenomena which take up space, and inextensible phenomena, in minds. The reconciliation of Maxwell's demon with increasing entropy, ...


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Short Answer Welcome! You've joined the ranks of those who ponder the nature of sense-data. The short answer is that there's no simple response to that. The notion of sense-data is a massively important idea in itself with many philosophers and theories attempting to grapple with it. Long Answer Questions such as your are great philosophy questions, but ...


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Building off of @Conifold 's comment, here is a list of SEP articles which seem to contain contemporary off-shoots of the original "Problem of Universals". If anyone has a suggestion to add to the list, that would be awesome! Abstract Objects Types and Tokens Tropes Nominalism in Metaphysics Platonism in Metaphysics Properties Objects Ontic ...


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Buddhism can be described as defined by it's acceptance of change, called there anicca or impermanence, and considered within that body of thought one of the Three Marks of existence, a core inextricable quality of being which cannot be avoided or ended. Buddha was a contemporary or near-contemporary of Heraclitus. Buddhist thought avoids the problems of ...


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Short Answer The concept of 'change' frequently falls under the study of metaphysics and ontology and is highly important in consideration of philisophical problems of identity. Long Answer According to WP: impermanence: Impermanence, also known as the philosophical problem of change, is a philosophical concept addressed in a variety of religions and ...


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How do you know your left hand exists? Or more generally, since everything is mediated by our own personal experience, how can we know anything for certain? Short Answer So, you've come to the right site because you can be advised that both questions are textbook examples of questions related to metaphysics, and that depending on the answers to your ...


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Short Answer It depends on which theory of concept you adhere to. Long Answer From SEP Concepts, we can see there are different concepts of 'concept' at play. (See why philosophy is so disputatious?) From the entry: 1. The ontology of concepts 1.1 Concepts as mental representations 1.2 Concepts as abilities 1.3 Concepts as abstract objects 1....


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Meanings come from being aware of causal relations. You might walk down a trail and notice nothing of significance. An expert tracker on the same trail might notice all sorts of indications of wildlife which indicated an animal went this way or that, what kind of animal and whether it was hunting prey or was in heat. All the little disturbances, tracks and ...


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"foster-mothers and nurses to suckle and bathe and wash the children, but in no ways to prattle or speak with them; for he would have learnt whether they would speak the Hebrew language (which he took to have been the first), or Greek, or Latin, or Arabic, or perchance the tongue of their parents of whom they had been born. But he laboured in vain, for ...


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Short Answer Much in the way a predicate about predicates is a second-order predicate, a second-order disposition is a disposition involving dispositions. This is an instance of what might be called 'conceptual self-reference' or 'recursive thinking'. Long Answer Let's make sure we have a good understanding of the term 'disposition' to help us disambiguate. ...


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I would like to base this answer on Baßler's analysis of Dennett's arguments about qualia being misidentified dispositions since he is on spot as far as descriptions and definitions go (see Baßler, David H. (2015): Qualia explained away: A Commentary on Daniel C. Dennett, in: T. Metzinger & J. M. Windt (Eds). Open MIND: 10(C). Frankfurt am Main: MIND ...


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The SEP article is based on the assumptions of analytic philosophy, that empiricism and reasoning are the valid methods of acquiring knowledge. Its 5 categories are not a narrow approach to analytic thinking, but instead reflect what appears to be an effort to include multiple schools of analytic thought. However, there are several major categories of ...


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