Skip to main content

New answers tagged

1 vote

Are your memories part of you?

I don't understand the difference that you introduce between the concept of "mind" and the concept of "me / self". As far as we can make it out based on the current evidence ...
FrancoisTheFrenchOne's user avatar
1 vote

Are your memories part of you?

Strange question. The past forms part of what we call ourselves (I am the person that got into medical school), even if we are not the same. Our memories are how we make sense of ourselves, but I don'...
andrós's user avatar
  • 1,426
2 votes

Are your memories part of you?

I can remember or forget memories. But they are always there You seem to be assuming that memories are somehow static entities that don't change. But this assumption may be wrong. Every time humans (...
mudskipper's user avatar
2 votes

Are your memories part of you?

In my view as well, the distinction between "self" and "own memories" is invalid. What exactly is a memory? Some irrelevant recollection of yesterday's game show? Or the memory of ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
1 vote

Are your memories part of you?

Your expectation of something unique and dramatic, of some wonderful explosion, is merely hindering and delaying your Self Realization. You are not to expect an explosion, for the explosion has ...
Rushi's user avatar
  • 3,377
5 votes

Are your memories part of you?

Your actual post builds again a dichotomy and splits the concept of a person in two entities, named “me” and “my mind”. And after the splitting your actual post asks how the two relate to each other, ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.5k
3 votes
Accepted

Responding to Berkeley's Likeness principle

You might respond by considering it to be irrelevant. You might take the view that mind-independent objects exist, and that mind-dependent ideas exist, and the there can be a correspondence between an ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.5k
0 votes

Is my yellow same as your yellow?

We can usually be pretty sure that others will agree when we point to something yellow but not always, such as in the case of the picture of a dress that broke the internet. But in any event, we don't ...
timtak's user avatar
  • 57
12 votes

Is my yellow same as your yellow?

Your yellow is functionally the same as my yellow (assuming normal colour vision). Take any two colours, and create a smooth transition between them, like these (from here): And those smooth ...
Jack Aidley's user avatar
  • 1,183
3 votes

Is my yellow same as your yellow?

Yes and No. Yellow is a word, describing an optical aggregation. The variations are limitless. We agree on something based on experience or measurement: both are subjective and/or inaccurate/...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
19 votes
Accepted

Is my yellow same as your yellow?

This is a fairly well-developed area of philosophical literature called the Knowledge Argument for Qualia. The general way this argument is constructed today comes from Frank Jackson's 1982 paper, ...
The Thought Detective's user avatar
0 votes

Is my yellow same as your yellow?

Short answer, "yellow" is objective, and is a specific wavelength (range) of light. The triangle is yellow... It is how your eye and brain got trained to associate a specific wavelength of ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
3 votes

Is my yellow same as your yellow?

Yes, we don't have a way to verify that your yellow is like mine, but you must know that I supposed at the fist place that you have a yellow sensation because I utilized the principal of analogy when ...
TRUTHS's user avatar
  • 119
3 votes

How does the direct realist explain illusions like the Müller-Lyer illusion?

John Searle, a famous direct realist, in his Seeing Things as They Are (GB) addresses the question of various versions of the Argument from Illusion. A lightweight answer to your question comes form ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.3k
4 votes
Accepted

How does the direct realist explain illusions like the Müller-Lyer illusion?

Following Maloney (2018) we can say that evaluating the length of the lines relative to one another (or the continuity of the stick in water) is introducing a different level of cognition, beyond mere ...
Brian Z's user avatar
  • 1,452
2 votes

Dreams inside dreams

It's a bit strange that nobody pointed out that the book Zhuang-zi itself has a passage (in the same chapter and having the same point as the butterfly passage) refering to dreams within dreams: ...
mudskipper's user avatar

Top 50 recent answers are included