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20 votes

Has brain-to-brain communication been addressed in the literature, and if so, is there a fundamental reorganization of philosophy required?

What exactly do we mean by "brain-to-brain communication"? I can already communicate with other brains in a variety of ways - speech, signs, demeanour, and so on. Even if there were a new ...
Steve's user avatar
  • 375
8 votes

Why are Dan Dennett and his heterophenomenonology largely ignored by the Wikipedia and Stanford articles on phenomenology?

There is absolutely nothing which necessitates that Wikipedia articles are accurate, let alone balanced and/or comprehensive. It is a site that relies upon user input and moderator checks which the ...
Futilitarian's user avatar
  • 4,435
8 votes

Can art be rated objectively?

Generally when people speaking plainly to share their true opinions(1) say that some piece of art is of high quality, the meaning is that... it is the sort of thing that people generally like it ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,750
7 votes

Does consciousness exist?

There is a kind of epistemological ‘duality’ to our thinking about consciousness. In 'The Puzzle of Conscious Experience', the philosopher David Chalmers describes the 'Easy Problem of Consciousness' ...
Bram28's user avatar
  • 2,719
7 votes

Why are Dan Dennett and his heterophenomenonology largely ignored by the Wikipedia and Stanford articles on phenomenology?

I'm just going to affirm what's in the comments. Neither the IEP's article on Phenomenology nor the SEP's article on Phenomenology contain references to Dennett at all, and the reason is simple. ...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k
6 votes
Accepted

Who or what is the being for whom Being is a question for Heidegger?

"Being and Time is a long and complex book." We may say that Heidegger's aim in his work is to discover what is common (more fundamental) to various different questions (inquiries) about the ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Did Sellars's argument against the Myth of the Given successfully challenge Husserl's phenomenology?

There is something to it, but things are more complicated. Sellars was not arguing against Husserl specifically, it is unlikely that he was even familiar with his phenomenology. He does draw on the ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.4k
5 votes

What does the "essence of time" mean for Merleau-Ponty?

Merleau-Ponty is a phenomenologist so his received view is "essence" in a Husserlian sense, as the ideal core of an intentional object, see What does Husserl mean by essences? However, he is also an ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.4k
5 votes

Can we imagine a perfect circle?

Chalmers does not mean ordinary visual imagination (our faculty to create representations which faintly resemble real visual sense impressions). Instead he means something like forming a concept, ...
viuser's user avatar
  • 4,841
5 votes

Are there secular philosophers who argue for predetermined and given meaning/value in life and essentialism?

Yes, there are such thinkers. I will mention four of them. One is Rene Guenon. He was a French philosopher from the 20th century, and he went against the grain of moderns thought as such. He thought ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar
5 votes

Who are some philosophers who explore the possibility/impossibility of the intimacy of understanding others?

This is akin to a major question in philosophy that is still being debated called "The Problem of Other Minds". The two broad questions within this debate are: The Thick Question: How can ...
The Thought Detective's user avatar
5 votes

If we did have a proven 'Theory of Everything' from physics, would it help to know why there is a universe?

If we had a correct theory of literally everything then yes it would by definition explain the origin of the universe, consciousness, and every other problem. However, the term Theory of Everything ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
4 votes

The phenomenon of Négatité

Nothing(ness) definitionally is being not Being. It therefore not is, ontologically. It is just that "not", the refusal to be this or that concrete X. Sartre often characterizes for-itself and its ...
ttnphns's user avatar
  • 440
4 votes

Who or what is the being for whom Being is a question for Heidegger?

According to Wikipedia this being "for whom Being is a question for Heidegger" would be ourselves: Dasein ... is a German word that means "being there" or "presence" (German: da "there"; sein "...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
  • 19.5k
4 votes

Who or what is the being for whom Being is a question for Heidegger?

"Ontological inquiry is indeed more primordial, as over against the ontical inquiry of the positive sciences." – Martin Heidegger, Being and Time, §3. Heidegger is an ontologist. To define ...
Cody Gray - on strike's user avatar
4 votes

Explanation of Dasein and Da-sein in Heidegger

First, one needs to understand how Dasein should be understood in Sein und Zeit (SuZ in what follows). It stems from the German word "Dasein" that can be translated by "existence". ...
Johan's user avatar
  • 449
4 votes

To what extent can one admit that language is an adequate outlet for explicit feelings and experiencings?

You have thoughts and feelings. I have them too. How do we know how they interrelate? We can't ever be sure. Your experience of happiness may differ from mine, for example. Words, tonality and ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
4 votes

Is this a good argument against mental causation?

Merely by inspecting a phenomenon physically, we cannot know whether it is affected by mental phenomena or not. I would argue that one sticking point in your argument lies around the use of "...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k
3 votes

how do we stop caring about what others think of us?

There is a nice sutta in the Pāli Canon that deals with this kind of thing. Specifically it deals with insults but can just as well apply to other unpleasantness. Akkosa Sutta: Insult "What do ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
  • 6,284
3 votes
Accepted

How many different usages of being is there in this short paragraph of Heidegger?

The original German is (from the Introduction, par. 2): Hinsehen auf, Verstehen und Begreifen von, Wählen, Zugang zu sind konstitutive Verhaltungen des Fragens und so selbst Seinsmodi eines ...
jeroenk's user avatar
  • 1,106
3 votes

In what ways is Merleau-Ponty following (late/unpublished) Husserl?

Good question, except that the answer is worth at least one or two doctoral theses. The question is way above my own amateur level, so perhaps this should just be a comment. However, as far as I ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar
3 votes

Eastern European Philosophy

Certainly, there are more philosophers working teaching writing and getting published today than ever. What we don't have is the cult of personality, the famous name arising from the vacuum of a small ...
MmmHmm's user avatar
  • 2,417
3 votes

Why is Sartre averse to "images" in consciousness?

To understand this passage, we have to note that Sartre inherits Husserl's theory of intentionality. For Husserl, all intentional mental states have both a content and an object. I am directed at the ...
transitionsynthesis's user avatar
3 votes

Which philosophers have argued well that existence is illusory?

Welcome, Joedean7. You ask a a question about other philosophers in the heading, then switch to your own argument. I have made a choice and addressed the latter. I offer a counter-argument. If ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
3 votes
Accepted

What does play of reflexions mean here?

'Hypostasis' is a philosophical term for the underlying reality of something, as opposed to the attributes or 'appearances' of the thing. For example, a red ball has attributes of being 'red' and '...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 21.2k
3 votes

To what extent can one admit that language is an adequate outlet for explicit feelings and experiencings?

There's an awful lot packed in to this question, which makes it difficult to answer. You did get a comprehensive survey of the standard philosophical problem of other minds in response to your other ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
  • 2,918
3 votes

Is this a good argument against mental causation?

As others have mentioned, an epistemic inability/failure doesn't imply an ontological impossibility. However, as I have dared raised this elsewhere, there's actually a very prolific line of research ...
infatuated's user avatar
  • 1,645
3 votes

Can art be rated objectively?

To say that painting A is better than painting B because you like painting A more than painting B is indeed tautological. You can avoid the tautology by realising it and taking steps not to utter it. ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
3 votes

Can art be rated objectively?

You can objectively measure how an art piece performs on a particular metric, but you must then make a subjective value judgment about how that metric translates to "better" or "worse&...
Indigenuity's user avatar

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