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What did Haugeland mean when he said that the grounding of ontical truth can be transcendental only as existential?

The role of death is not primarily to shave off leaves or branches or die back, etc. Birth and death set the bounds of human finitude: a finitude in which one can make the most of one's time as one ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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Ontic/Ontological as parallel to a posteriori/a priori?

Heidegger in his Kantbuch says that a synthetic cognition is one that is "revealed" by being itself. In turn, what is known in a priori cognitions is independent of what is experienced in ...
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Private language argument as an argument against the self and so egosim

Computer programming has examples of "private languages." There are languages that are used to communicate only between components of a particular program, which the program does not use to ...
causative's user avatar
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René Descartes' and Wittgenstein Doubt: Self and the Existence of Others?

Of course you can. Scientific Method involves only holding truths to be as sure as the evidence we have. And to remain open to new evidence, that may change the balance of evidence. Your doubts may be ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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Private language argument as an argument against the self and so egosim

This is about qualia, experiences which cannot be known or communicated beyond an individual subjectivity. "good for me" is a good example of a language game, because there are massive ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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Does phenomenology reject causality, in that there are natural laws to be understood and utilised? What is the stance on technological progress/devel?

A flavour of Heidegger's attitude to technology can be understood from the following quote from The Principle of Reason (1957) in which he seems to allude to AI. The criticism is that we might follow ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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Is Hume talking about noumena in section 12 of the Enquiry?

You're misunderstanding Kant. The phenomena/noumena distinction has nothing to do with the distinction between some states which we, as humans, given our physiology, enter, when we're affected by an ...
abracadabra's user avatar
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I've heard that Hegel's view on how to attain absolute truth differed from Kant's. In what ways?

Kant regarded the "absolute truth", or the knowledge of the thing in itself, to be impossible - because thought is a mere synthesis (as Kant likes to stress) which works with content that is ...
abracadabra's user avatar

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