44

While I'm not entirely convinced of the premises of the question, in general people seek out philosophies that address conditions of life as they experience it. In the marketplace of ideas, a philosophy may thrive not as much because of its connection with deeper truth, but because of its connection with present conundrums. In light of that, I'd submit ...


39

I can think of 2 reasons: Naturalism is the philosophy most promoted in public schools. With some exceptions, people tend to stick with what they're taught in school. Believing in a supernatural being that loves us used to be a widely accepted and even promoted way to view the universe, even in schools. That is no longer the case. The new standard is to ...


17

Jacob Ross, Rejecting Ethical Deflationism,' Ethics 116, 2006: 742–68 defines nihilism as : ▻ NIHILISM - DEFINITION '...the view that the notions of good and bad and of right and wrong are illusions and that, objectively speaking, no option or state of affairs is better than any other, nor are any two options or states of affairs equally good. Thus, while ...


8

If nihilism is more popular these days, I would argue this is because the ideas which guided people through life with certainty and optimism no longer enjoy a consensus. Nietzsche discussed the prospect of a post-religious world (God is dead, Will to power, Ubermensch), and was disgusted with the idea of an entire society driven by mass culture, which he ...


6

I am also concerned about some recent social movements in Western countries. They can be seen as reactions to the displacements caused by information technologies and economic globalization. This is somewhat reminiscent, although much milder for now, of the social and political turmoil partly traceable to the effects of the industrial revolution at the end ...


6

I am not terribly optimistic that the division will be overcome in any sort of principled way. After all, the analytic and continental divide is still alive and well, and to mend that one there isn't even a need to be versed in a second field. One problem is that science works. Scientists don't, therefore, have much incentive to mend anything with "...


4

A few considerations: When you say "save" what do you mean? Recording words used? Ensuring there are always native speakers? There are different costs associated with different degrees of preservation. It is always desirable to preserve anything, but if we are forced to decide between preserving a language and increasing science education, it doesn't seem ...


4

I think the answer depends on whether you're talking about ontology or epistemology. By phrasing the question as you have, I think there's only one practical answer given a modern scientific understanding: culture is the term for a certain set of semi-arbitrary social behaviors of social animals, most particularly Homo sapiens. It's not so much that ...


4

There are really two interrelated questions at stake here. First, there is a question about the "sanity" of an individual relative to a culture. Second, there is a question about the "sanity" of the views of that culture. Much is hidden in the term "sanity" here however. The first question is easily resolved. An individual is "sane" relative to their ...


4

You can see : Hans Sluga, Heidegger's Crisis: Philosophy and Politics in Nazi Germany (1993). Nazi's regime produced "consensus" and "legitimation", promoting academic philosophers and intellectuals that were ideologically supportive, like Heidegger. It produced also an ideological background based on a partially misleading reading of some intelelctuals ...


4

It seems that a very plausible rationale was set rolling, within the academia, right from the middle of the 19th century, that ultimately somewhat legitimized the political environment in the 1930s-50s. First, you seem making an unjustified assumption here. That Nationalistic minded philosophers stared writing in the 19th century with and end result like ...


4

The traditional role of a taboo is prohibition of an action, not of discussion, but the two are often mixed when the term is used loosely, see e.g. Gao's study of English "taboo" words. Taboos against homicide or incest had obvious biological/social benefits. Volume 3 of a classical comparative study of mythology and religion, Frazer's Golden Bough,...


4

According to the philpapers survey, 78% of the participating philosophers said they accept or lean towards atheism. 14% accept or lean towards theism, and the rest went into 'Other' with 12.6%. You can find the survey here: https://philpapers.org/surveys/results.pl


4

I find that most modern quirks can be attributed to globalism yes, but specifically the internet. The internet provides exposure to elements you usually would not see. If you are of the same mind as myself, you believe that people are a product of their surroundings. That is how patriots and ideological fanatics come to exist and how unique cultures are ...


4

This answer is just speculation Why it is popular: People enjoy it. They can act how ever they please because immorality is impossible. It also makes them feel intellectually superior with no more effort than understanding a short sentence. The brevity of the belief is important to the "nihilists" laziness of learning and so their intellect and wisdom can ...


4

The way paradigms shift quickly in modern times is likely even more a cause than an enabling factor. Whoever has seen multiple contradicting views on one matter being accepted, then debunked, as truths through their lifetime will eventually find it unlikely that "the next truth will be any different" - and at the same time, see "truths are multiple, ...


4

The very question: "Is there an African philosophy?" is a subject of debate among philosophers from Africa. Upon investigation you will find the situation far more involved than a 'yes/no' answer. These are some of the most prominent names and a selection of books that exemplify African issues: African Philosophy: Myth and Reality by Paulin J. Hountondji ...


3

The reference is to Schopenhauer as Educator: The man who will not belong to the general mass, has only to stop "taking himself easily"; to follow his conscience, which cries out to him, "Be thyself! all that thou doest and thinkest and desirest, is not thyself!" The essay is the third of the Untimely Meditations (German: Unzeitgemässe Betrachtungen), ...


3

The question is interesting although it is difficult to answer from the position of the two mentioned philosophers and perhaps too complicated for this site and format. Modern mass/popular culture is a multidimensional phenomenon, and I doubt that Adorno and Horkheimer would have faced it uni-dimensionally. Their critique of the bourgeois / capitalist idea ...


3

One current philosopher and theologian, Robert Barron, would dispute this claim by looking at what is meant by the word "freedom." Freedom, in Kaczynski eyes is the ability to do whatever one pleases. However, another dictionary definition for the word "freedom" is "familiarity or openness in speech or behavior." As Barron often points out, familiarity or ...


3

Underdetermination by evidence does not pose a threat to scientific theories, it only poses a threat to realistic interpretation of scientific theories. In other words, empirical adequacy of scientific theories, on which their usefulness is based, is completely unaffected by the underdetermination. What is affected is ontological interpretation of them as ...


3

Because people can afford it. Back in a time when most of our efforts were invested in surviving, people couldn't afford being nihilists. There were much fewer safety nets given to the people by the state, so you needed a lot stronger ties to family and the local community. Without such strong ties, even a small illness, or even just breaking your arm ...


3

Objectivism deserves denying, due to the apparent limits of the human senses. I wouldn't say this directly leads to nihilism, although I can see why a lot of people take it that way, which is unfortunate. The lack of an objective reality should only serve to open minds, making them more fluid and less steadfast in their beliefs, however it seems people take ...


3

a trivial web search turns up: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_religious_populations


2

Peter Singer's One World: The Ethics of Globalization (Worldcat link) is a good, brief and thoughtful read on this topic. It discusses humanitarian intervention and moral responsibility and the challenges of those in an interconnected world.


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