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The best concept of art I've heard was from a teacher I've admired a lot at the university: art is the communication of feelings So, yes. In addition, this teacher mentioned the relationship of art with technique and science, apparently suggested by Mario Bunge for any discipline: science is knowledge (e.g. Musical theory). Technique is what we can do ...


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Questions Does art require an emotional state or an idea to be transmitted between two parties? If so, does the communication have to be intended by the author or can it be incidental? Added later (to @frankhubeny) Does art create communication? Or if art is communication? Or perhaps that the former implies the latter? Perhaps best to focus on @Eliran ...


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If we take communication as a mean to transmit information, with information allowed to be something as simple as one's sentiment, and with art having be sensed in some way, even if it is to sense its void, then I fail to see how art can not be communication. Like other answers brought up, Art is a contested term. Fundamentally, however, it is an expression....


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I started working at an art school a few months ago, and have since been asking myself what I think counts as art. The whole definition problem started when our cultural understanding of what art is became divorced from the concept of artisanship -- instead becoming linked to ideas about inspiration, uniqueness and genius (which lead to celebrity artists). ...


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Communication is merely the act of sharing mental contexts: thoughts, ideas, knowledge, feelings, perceptions, etc... Any human sense can be used as a channel for communication by codifying a mental context into a form perceptible to that sense. For instance, if I tap someone on the shoulder, click my tongue, and point, I can effectively communicate an ...


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I agree with Rusi's answer. This provides another way to consider art as a form of communication even when unintended. Michael Polanyi claims the following about knowledge in general: (page 7) ...all knowledge is either tacit or rooted in tacit knowledge. If that is the case then any form of explicit communication is rooted in tacit knowledge. This may ...


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Beethoven is reported to have said (my emphases) When I open my eyes I must sigh, for what I see is contrary to my religion, and I must despise the world which does not know that music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy, the wine which inspires one to new generative processes, and I am the Bacchus who presses out this glorious wine for ...


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A raised eyebrow is usually sufficient to imply irony. Irony is little more than a gesture at an implicit internal contradiction: a way of pointing out that expected outcomes and actual outcomes are markedly different. We don't really need words to express it — all we need to do is hold the dichotomy up so it's visible — but words can really refine the point....


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Can sentences be true or false? Sentences are sequences of words, written, spoken, or otherwise made physically perceptible to human senses. As such they are physical objects and, therefore, can neither be true nor false, at least not in any usual sense of these words. Sentences are used to convey meaning between human beings. We loosely characterise a ...


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Wikipedia has this to say about self-reference: Self-reference occurs in natural or formal languages when a sentence, idea or formula refers to itself. The question has to do with what "object of" means in the following context: ...object of self-reference: 1) a sentence that negates its own truth. 2) an event that negates its own existence... Since ...


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The passage you quote is from Keith Donnellan's paper, "Reference and Definite Descriptions". Donnellan references a disagreement between Russell and Strawson about the correct way to understand definite descriptions, that is constructions that might have the form "the F". Russell in the classic paper "On Denoting" treats them as being equivalent to "the one ...


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