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I suppose you are looking for reasons not to identify properties to sets. (1) A set is a particular ( an abstract particular) , but properies are often considered as universals . (2) A property is something an object possesses, shares; it is also the case for a set? I mean, could I say that an apple " possesses" the set of red objecs? (3) Suppose ...


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Imprecise language is getting in the way You interpret the meaning of "Unicorns don't exist" as "there's this thing called a unicorn which has the property of not existing" which you have properly identified as being incorrect. However, consider this interpretation: "Unicorns don't exist" meaning "The set of all unicorns ...


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Short Answer This question goes to the heart of human nature, experience, and justification as a product of the human genome. If we slightly soften the ask, then there are plenty of examples of ideas that are near-universal, reasonable propositions, such as 'one and one makes two', 'up is the opposite of down', 'ants are smaller than elephants', and '...


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Short Answer According to the entry 'Concepts' from Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Concepts are the building blocks of thoughts. Consequently, they are crucial to such psychological processes as categorization, inference, memory, learning, and decision-making. This much is relatively uncontroversial. But the nature of concepts—the kind of things ...


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Mauro's first comment is a perfectly fine answer. I'll expand upon it. In informal set theory, a set is an unordered collection of things. While a list has order and might have duplicates, a set either contains a thing or it does not. Informally, people could just define sets by describing which things are in them. Some examples: A: The set of all ...


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This is really a question about the definition of "rational person." Rationality can be subdivided into a number of different types or categories of reasoning, which include: Deductive reasoning (drawing logical inferences from rigorous application of the rules of classical logic). Inductive reasoning (inferring that a general statement is "...


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A statement (in the logical sense) is merely an uttered proposition that has a truth-value. That does not imply that we know what the truth-value is; it only implies that ideally we could know whether it was true or false. If I were to say "unicorns have blue feathers", that would be a statement because potentially we could determine whether it was ...


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There is a basic confusion in your question: one thing is whether a proposition is true or false, and a very different thing is the fact that some people think it's true and other people think it's false.


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Short Answer 'Theory' is used by both scientists and philosophers, and the nature of space and time is still very much the domain of the philosophy of science, as opposed to science proper. Long Answer According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the vernacular 'theory' comes from Latin: 1590s, "conception, mental scheme," from Late Latin theoria ...


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