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Matilde Marcolli is also worth mentioning here (especially since the OP is a computer scientist according to his profile). See the two linguistics classes she taught before and the references thereof: http://www.its.caltech.edu/~matilde/CS101Winter2015.html http://www.its.caltech.edu/~matilde/MAT1509HS2019.html


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The Organon by Aristotle is a set of six books. Here is an example of the use of "predicate" in Categories v (page 29) The species is predicated of all individual examples, the genus of these and the species....For all we affirm of the predicate will also be affirmed of the subject. In a footnote in the Prior Analytics, I. iv, the translator, Hugh ...


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The issues of generality, self-reference and a hierarchy of languages would likely not be a solution to Wittgenstein's mysticism. As Russell suggests (Tractatus, page 23) Wittgenstein would of course reply that his whole theory is applicable unchanged to the totality of such languages. G. E. M. Anscombe illustrates Wittgenstein's position by quoting 6.52 ...


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I will make several suggestions, although I am not certain that I interpret the question as intended. The strongest case (arguably) for philosophical foundations to epistemology in modern times, including the idea that positive sciences require such an inquiry into their foundations to function properly, was emphatically made by Husserl throughout his life. ...


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The OP asks for other terms or systematic treatments of "unarticulated background". One place to look is in the concept of mystery in contrast to problem as presented by Gabriel Marcel. A problem would correspond roughly to Michael Polanyi's explicit knowledge while mystery would correspond to tacit knowledge. Kenneth T. Gallagher describes Marcel's idea of ...


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The propositions you're describing fit under the broad category of modal logic. According to the Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy, A modal is an expression (like ‘necessarily’ or ‘possibly’) that is used to qualify the truth of a judgement. Modal logic is, strictly speaking, the study of the deductive behavior of the expressions ‘it is necessary that’ ...


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This is only a partial answer, but hopefully it provides additional references. There was a similar project to remove disagreements "on the reference terminology", however, only among scientists, that A. J. Ayer credits with Otto Neurath: (page 82) It was his acceptance of this doctrine of physicalism that let Neurath to insist so much upon the unity of ...


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To understand why anyone might think speech acts are important, it's important to understand where the idea of speech acts appeared and what it was in response to. Speech acts are as you correctly tag part of the philosophy of language. As the story goes, the philosophy of language is a discipline that picks up in the late 19th century which sought to (a) ...


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Colin McGinn, in his book The Philosophy of Language, discusses at least four criticisms of Davidson's theory. Is it enough to say that knowledge of meaning is knowledge of truth conditions - especially when we restrict ourselves homophonic statements of truth conditions? Can't we ask what this knowledge of truth conditions itself involves? We need to ...


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