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1

See : Maritain https://books.google.fr/books?id=PzUnH4Z0APsC&pg=PA146&lpg=PA146&dq=predicamental+accident,+predicable+accident&source=bl&ots=7_S9XmZBDc&sig=ACfU3U0xIdTJyZSafykCrGLFt7oPpB6NYA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjv-uz2wcHlAhXO0eAKHYtZBgYQ6AEwAnoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=predicamental%20accident%2C%20predicable%20accident&...


12

Colloquial meanings of the two words are pretty close, accidental is "occurring unexpectedly or by chance", contingent is "subject to chance; occurring or existing only if (certain circumstances) are the case; dependent on". If there is a shade of difference, it is that contingent may well be expected as a possibility, albeit along other options, whereas ...


1

Just as extra information: Barwise worked for one or two decades on the analysis of the situation (which seems very akin to what you call 'context') in logic. He proposed changes to the main approaches to logic, meant to include the 'situation'. Unfortunately I don't know what kind of developments his studies led to afterwards. You can check his main text ...


2

There has been an emerging literature within the field of logic and computer science engaged with solving the problems encountered in the reasoning area of artificial intelligence which has consequently led to the construction and presentation of new 'computational models of argumentation' which contains material pertaining to the role of redundancy in ...


2

I believe that as a general rule, repetition actually aids rhetoric. This is recognized in quotations about repeating lies. Repetition is required for learning generally, so it makes sense that repetition and redundancy makes it easier for people to repeat that which has been repeated. Persuasion and repetition go hand in hand.


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