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Can evolutionary processes be characterized as a form of intelligence?

intelligence is not information: it is a process, or an innate capacity to use information in order to respond to ever-changing requirements. It is a capacity to acquire, adapt, modify, extend and use ...
Idiosyncratic Soul's user avatar
2 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

I admit that this is a serious problem, but it does not mean that it is a complicated problem. In my opinion, the answer to this question is actually very simple: "I" is an "emergence,&...
Mike Song's user avatar
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1 vote

Can evolutionary processes be characterized as a form of intelligence?

Some aspects of evolution are very randomly redundant. Not everything evolution comes up with has purpose utility. It's also not just natural selection. I prefer looking at evolution like a series of ...
Slawek's user avatar
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3 votes

Can evolutionary processes be characterized as a form of intelligence?

One of the main principles of biological evolution: The process is not goal-oriented. In philosophical terms: Biological evolution is not a teleological process. Instead evolution is a process of ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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-3 votes

Can evolutionary processes be characterized as a form of intelligence?

Yes. Intelligence is problem-solving ability. Evolution does solve problems. Creativity involves trying out a bunch of variations/ideas and filtering out the ones that don't work. That describes ...
causative's user avatar
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2 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

> Why am I me and not someone else? It's the same question as why is it today and not Tuesday, May 7th, 1652? Because you chose to ask the question today, not 400 years ago. Formerly speaking, the ...
Miss_Understands's user avatar
3 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

There's a fundamental misunderstanding here. When we ask "How or why am I this particular conscious individual?", we feel like we're asking an ontological question, when in fact it's merely ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

Both Mauro and Chris Degnen have good answers in the idealism direction. Here is one more of the same vein. Infant to Adult and back Have you seen an infant grow up? When we adults are in pain we say: ...
Rushi's user avatar
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2 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

OP: Why am I this particular conscious individual? In one respect this question aims at a central mystery: the hard problem of consciousness, but in this case from consciousness's perspective where ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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4 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

This question is arising, or more importantly, vexing you, because you have wrong ideas and you have fixated on them. The notion of a persisting separate self was debunked long ago, not only by the ...
Scott Rowe's user avatar
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5 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

We may use SEP's entry reagarding Consciousness for general context. More specifically, Hellie raises the "vertiginous question" in his review of of David Chalmers, The Character of ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
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The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

A physicalist (reductive materialist) answer is that your consciousness reduces to what happens in your brain, and that ends up the way it does because of genes and environmental conditions. So a ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
1 vote

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

given the fact that there are many conscious individuals that exist, and given that I am one of these conscious individuals, how, and more importantly why, am I this particular conscious individual ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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6 votes

The vertiginous question: Why am I me and not someone else?

Normally a child learns to distinguish what belongs to his body and what not. The latter is the seed for the concept of an external world, while the first is the seed for the concept of “I”. Both ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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1 vote

What is something that math cannot be applied to and doesn't involve math?

I would argue no. The reason is I believe that mathematics is a purely human construct which we use to describe our universe. I think an illustrative example is that, for much of recorded history, ...
JimmyJames's user avatar
1 vote

What is something that math cannot be applied to and doesn't involve math?

There are two very different ideas of what mathematics really is, although they are intimately related. However, before coming to that, we have to recognise that there is something which looks like ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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-1 votes

What is something that math cannot be applied to and doesn't involve math?

In my ontology, there are only three things that exist outside my own mind: Objects Mathematics Other people's opinions Mathematics is not applicable to, for instance, my feelings when the kitty ...
Miss_Understands's user avatar
2 votes

What is something that math cannot be applied to and doesn't involve math?

Math has no application to the spelling of words. The fact that "dictionary" is spelled that way is a social fact, unrelated to math. Unless you are including the mere observations and ...
Lowri's user avatar
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0 votes

Does Gödel's argument that minds are more powerful than computers have the inconsistency loophole?

To directly answer the question in the title: yes, the problem described by Raatikainen is a genuine hole in the Lucas/Penrose argument. The standard interpretation of GF says GF is not provable in F. ...
benrg's user avatar
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2 votes

Which WILL is right or most important?

We probably just want to go straight back to Socrates here and say that all of these are aspects of the will to The Good. Each of the thinkers you've listed focus on a particular tool or mechanism — ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes

Which WILL is right or most important?

There is no fixed criteria for ascertaining which WILL is right or most important. It depends on your inclination and the aspects of human existence which you find most compelling. For example- for me ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
2 votes

Which WILL is right or most important?

Will to meaning and witll to knowledge come to the same. How far Frankl and Vivekananda are related is a quite different question: Frankl was speaking from the space of much deeper torment — What's ...
Rushi's user avatar
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1 vote

In a very specific sense, what are the precise reasons why someone would not be able to verify whether or not their judgment is delusional?

Metacognition This thing is about ability to think about one's own thinking. In people with delusions, metacognitive processes can be disrupted, meaning they have difficulty reflecting on and ...
Groovy's user avatar
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1 vote

In moral philosophy, how do researchers perceive what is right and wrong (and why)? (For humanity, as a whole)

Humanity involves collective cultures , societies and civilisation that humans have built. There are different moral and ethical values. Therefore we can not talk about absolute right and wrong for ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
1 vote

In moral philosophy, how do researchers perceive what is right and wrong (and why)? (For humanity, as a whole)

There's also the "Golden Rule". The Golden Rule is the principle of treating others as one would want to be treated by them. Source There are various sayings and translations that have a ...
Artfaith's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Illusionism in the philosophy of mind

I believe you have misunderstood Dennett. He is not arguing that qualia are 3rd person. he is arguing that qualia do not exist. From Quining Qualia: At first blush it would be hard to imagine a ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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3 votes

In moral philosophy, how do researchers perceive what is right and wrong (and why)? (For humanity, as a whole)

It is impossible to answer this question without identifying the subject of this qualification (right or wrong). A human individual or a group of human individuals History of humanity as a whole ...
TheMatrix Equation-balance's user avatar
4 votes

In moral philosophy, how do researchers perceive what is right and wrong (and why)? (For humanity, as a whole)

The most common idea is called Common Sense Convergence. Although there are variations, in general humans tend to move towards, adopt, favor, defend and justify things that work for them and feel ...
Scott Rowe's user avatar
  • 1,676
3 votes

In moral philosophy, how do researchers perceive what is right and wrong (and why)? (For humanity, as a whole)

"What is the most common idea behind right and wrong across all religions, philosophers, and beliefs?" There isn't one. There is a huge variation. This is the central question of what is ...
Bumble's user avatar
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2 votes

What is more important: simplicity or induction?

Descartes and Solipsism Solipsism follows inexorably from Descartes. A simple reductio ad absurdum (or contrapositive or modus tollens) suffices to get us out of that mess. i.e. If    Cartesianism ⇒ ...
Rushi's user avatar
  • 3,983
4 votes

What is more important: simplicity or induction?

We could differentiate metaphysical simplicity from explanatory simplicity. Metaphysical simplicity is what you're talking about: the number of entities existing in reality. This has issues: shouldn't ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
4 votes

What is more important: simplicity or induction?

Occam's razor is the central principle of induction. Theoretically, we seek the simplest explanation - in terms of the shortest and simplest formulas - that exactly matches and predicts all of the ...
causative's user avatar
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1 vote

Type of mapping between subjective experience and the physical configuration?

If you hear a song, you have the subjective experience of it. Do you really believe that by specifying the physical configuration of the radio that is transmitting the song, you will ever get a ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
3 votes

How can syntactic manipulation give rise to understanding?

Producing outputs is not equivalent to understanding, which the Chinese Room Argument proves. In fact, generative AI has shown us a modern example of exact (or perhaps near exact) mimicry not being ...
Aibaahl's user avatar
  • 324
3 votes
Accepted

Type of mapping between subjective experience and the physical configuration?

Mathematically, a map is a triple formed by the domain, the range and the rule. Unfortunately models from neuroscience are still far away from formalizing the relation between subjective experience ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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0 votes

Are your memories part of you?

Memories are narratives which left an impression of very good , good , neutral , bad and very bad. These impressions help build a perception of self.This way memory contribute to the perception of ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
0 votes

Free will and the Libet experiments

The experiment about Benjamin Libet has been a very troubling thing for me in recent years, so I have spent a lot of time thinking and discussing it. I found that this experiment does not prove the ...
Mike Song's user avatar
  • 323
1 vote
Accepted

Is our consciousness evidence of the existence of a true ontology that underlies many "conventional" ontologies?

You ask: Is our consciousness evidence of the existence of a true ontology that underlies many "conventional" ontologies. I think your question is prescient, but I think the terminology &...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.2k
2 votes

Can an entity predict itself?

From your comment: How can a simple question be so much easily misintrepreted[sic]? The simplicity of asking a question does not always correlate to the simplicity of answering it or even ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
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0 votes

Is our consciousness evidence of the existence of a true ontology that underlies many "conventional" ontologies?

The question seems to combine several methodologies in inappropriate ways. Starting with the primacy of experience -- is phenomenalism. Phenomenalism can, with great effort, be formulated to be semi-...
Dcleve's user avatar
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0 votes

Is our consciousness evidence of the existence of a true ontology that underlies many "conventional" ontologies?

The OP’s post claims that “our specific conscious experience is a distinct thing in the universe, determined by some features and patterns in the brain, not by our wishes, frameworks, or worldview.” ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 34.8k
1 vote

Is our consciousness evidence of the existence of a true ontology that underlies many "conventional" ontologies?

You say : Thus, our specific conscious experience is a distinct thing in the universe, determined by some features and patterns in the brain, not by our wishes, frameworks, or worldview. Conscious ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
-1 votes

Is our consciousness evidence of the existence of a true ontology that underlies many "conventional" ontologies?

One of the seminal authors on “western” Marxism, Georg Lucaks, wrote a powerful (and angry!) critique on Existentialism in which he gives this broad classification of philosophies: We see clearly ...
Rushi's user avatar
  • 3,983
0 votes

Are these two radically different kinds of psychological concepts one representing behavior (to mean) and the other cognitive (to understand)?

If you compress psychology into one single sentence for the beginner: Psychology is the study of human Affects, Behaviour and Cognition, abbreviated “ABC”. IMO it does not bring much clarity to ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 34.8k
3 votes

Are these two radically different kinds of psychological concepts one representing behavior (to mean) and the other cognitive (to understand)?

In semantics, there are two broad views: internalism and externalism. Externalism is the view that meaning bearers cause meaning, that is, meaning is a property of words, whereas on the internalist ...
J D's user avatar
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