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Are there circular reasoning in these explanations?

An AI agent may have similar behaviour, but it does not have a mind. Why not include animals too, so you have one simple explanation for everything. It does not work. It makes sense. It does not ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
0 votes

Are all arguments for the existence of other minds circular?

All arguments eventually become circular, because straight lines do not occur naturally in the known universe. Linearity is theoretical. The question is the diameter of the circle. In this case the ...
JOHNS WOOD GADGETS's user avatar
3 votes

Are all arguments for the existence of other minds circular?

We do not know whether the mental processes of other persons cause their behaviour similarly to my mental processes causing my behaviour. But other people belong to the same species. In general, they ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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1 vote

What exactly is the implausibility and unconvincingness of solipsism?

I consider it unplausible and unconvincing that solipsists do not act and behave as solipsists in their daily life. Solipsism is only an interesting game of thoughts.
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 31.5k
1 vote

Whose perspective on evidence is correct: Hitchens's razor or Carl Sagan's?

"What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence" This is a recipe for confirmation bias, as it is likely to be used to dismiss ideas that you don't like ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
2 votes

What exactly is the implausibility and unconvincingness of solipsism?

OP: "Where in this explanation are implausible and unconvincing statements?" Solipsism says that only my mind exists Your mind has been cultivated by interaction with others and immersion ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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6 votes

Whose perspective on evidence is correct: Hitchens's razor or Carl Sagan's?

They are two aphorisms intended to make a point, not to be considered the last word. You will find similar superficial contrasts in lots of everyday maxims, such as 'penny wise, pound foolish' which ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.4k
0 votes

Divided brain thought experiment: what is an analog of Born rule in biology?

There is no meaningful analogy with the Born rule. The rule rises because of a very specific property of wave functions in quantum theory, namely that a valid wave function can be expressed as an ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.4k
1 vote

Are agent explanations better than non agent explanations?

This question has a variety of flawed assumptions. First, it should not have been set on Jupiter. We cannot see the surface of Jupiter. Mars, or some moon, would have been a much better setting. ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 13.7k
3 votes

Are agent explanations better than non agent explanations?

You ask: Are agent explanations better than non agent explanations? and Is this because of psychology or this because of a valid philosophical instinct? In this sense, are agent explanations “...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
7 votes

Are agent explanations better than non agent explanations?

@Marco hit the nail on the head with where current science of human cognition is concerned. There is a well studied and verified "agency bias" in humans. That this exists is quite well ...
Annika's user avatar
  • 1,653
2 votes

Are agent explanations better than non agent explanations?

I think your question is interesting even when put in a general sense, namely why do humans tend to find certain explanations more plausible than others when the explanations are of necessity very ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.4k
4 votes

Are agent explanations better than non agent explanations?

Neither of your candidate explanations is quite correct as they both seem to assume a divine designer. A seems to assume a deterministic universe where everything was designed in the beginning of time ...
Pertti Ruismäki's user avatar
1 vote

Divided brain thought experiment: what is an analog of Born rule in biology?

Let me reduce this problem to a simpler yet equivalent one - consider the following thought experiment: You toss a fair coin. If it comes up heads you are given a billion dollars otherwise you are ...
nir's user avatar
  • 4,806
1 vote

Divided brain thought experiment: what is an analog of Born rule in biology?

The no-cloning theorem forbids cloning of information on the quantum level. In the light of this theorem speculations like copying of consciousness and mind uploading seem rather questionable. Sperry’...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 31.5k
0 votes

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

Consciousness is a state of being. You are conscious. Or... you are asleep, in a come, or. Dead and gone. You don't "have a consciousness". You are "conscious". Like if you were ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
2 votes

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

I can easily lose consciousness, by falling asleep, consuming too much alcohol, or having a general anesthetic; losing my mind would be much more serious.
Simon Crase's user avatar
0 votes

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

Consciousness is the individualized implementation of The Mind in the physical level.
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
1 vote

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

The aggregate of form corresponds to what we would call material or physical factors. It includes not only our own bodies, but also the material objects that surround us - the earth, the oceans, the ...
user66697's user avatar
  • 800
3 votes

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

Mind is the substratum within which all thoughts are created. That is, the mind gives rise to thoughts; thoughts are developed within the mind. Consciousness is the faculty which interacts with these ...
DanielFBest's user avatar
1 vote

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

Mind is the set of all processes in the brain, i.e. mind is a synonym for the totality of mental processes. Consciousness is a property of certain mental processes. The search for the Neural ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 31.5k
4 votes

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

The key difference is that consciousness is a subset of the effects associated with the mind. Much of your mental activity is subconscious. If, for example, you ever attempt to complete a cryptic ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.4k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between mind and consciousness?

Mind describes all our internal processes by which we guide a "self" through a complex world. From the dawn of psychology, it has been clear that our introspection of our consciousness is ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 13.7k
1 vote

Which simplicity is given greater priority: explanatory simplicity or ontological simplicity?

Your assessment is facile. You cannot simply assume that the existence of one thing is more likely than the existence of two, which seems to be your interpretation of Occam's razor. As for the two ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.4k
0 votes

How do people justify their belief in other minds and reject solipsism if Occam's Razor does not provide an answer?

If Occam's Razor says that solipsism wins in quantitative simplicity, and the existence of other minds wins in explanatory simplicity, then what are we supposed to believe? Why is priority given to: ...
ac15's user avatar
  • 1,278
0 votes

How do people justify their belief in other minds and reject solipsism if Occam's Razor does not provide an answer?

Its ingrained within us. Before we mature and can ask ourselves these philosophical questions we will have lived as children and teenagers amongst people that we take as granted have minds and act ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
-1 votes

How do people justify their belief in other minds and reject solipsism if Occam's Razor does not provide an answer?

IEP - Solipsism and The Problem of Other Minds https://iep.utm.edu/solipsis/ Descartes’ account of the nature of mind implies that the individual acquires the psychological concepts that he possesses ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
  • 1,681
1 vote

Is there the language in the mind and how it changes based on the language in the world?

Chomsky argues that language, to a degree, is inherent in the mind. This is not the specifics of any one language like nouns or verbs, but the notion of a noun and a verb. If I recall correctly, he ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
-2 votes

Is there the language in the mind and how it changes based on the language in the world?

To decode the language of our mental processes is one of the biggest tasks of neuroscience. Single neurons communicate with electrical discharge. But the level of the single neuron does not even ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 31.5k
0 votes

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

Since you are asking about insights from history, there are indeed comparable advancements in "mind technologies" whose impact on the related cognitive capabilities we can study: The ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
0 votes

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

I think this question may be more suited to the Philosophy SE than you realise, because it raises the question of, "What do you mean by 'thinking?'" In my long career as a software developer,...
cjs's user avatar
  • 128
0 votes

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think? Our capacity to think is a function of our brain, and as long as we live a healthy life, our brain will be available for us to think. Our brain ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 7,572
2 votes

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

This isn't really a good fit for Philosophy, because it has actual empirically measurable truth. Specifically - without explicit effort to counteract the effect - your brain offloads work onto others ...
Steven Armstrong's user avatar
2 votes

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

There are two types of arguments on this point. Both have their own importance. When sunlight is focused on an object by a convex lens, the total amount of sunlight / heat on both sides is almost ...
SonOfThought's user avatar
  • 3,773
1 vote

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

I do not think the use of AI will reduce our "capacity to think critically" by itself, but it will most likely skew our perceptions of reality, our opinions and so on and forth, just like ...
AnoE's user avatar
  • 2,714
0 votes

What well-discussed alternatives are there to the Extended Mind Thesis?

I think the objection is aesthetic. People object to the thesis because of the terminology. It is rather like an extended body thesis, which considers the body to include any tools one might use, such ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.4k
5 votes

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

There's a recent article about negative impact on memory Specifically, the study provides evidence that the excessive use of ChatGPT can develop procrastination, cause memory loss, and dampen ...
ac15's user avatar
  • 1,278
10 votes
Accepted

Will the use of AI reduce our capacity to think?

It depends on what you mean by "to think", but from the extended mind thesis it actually increases our ability to critically think. I no longer know most of the phone numbers of my friends ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
1 vote

Can one be cruel to nonsentient things?

Yes. I think we can and do be cruel to objects. But it is pretend cruelty. We recognize that we are playing and pretending. Kids blowing up GIJoe's with firecrackers, or playing Barbie and have Ken ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
4 votes

Can one be cruel to nonsentient things?

How do you define "sentience"? Is it binary or are there degrees of sentience? Scientists conduct experiments on "lower" animals all the time: rabbits, mice, chimpanzees, fish, ...
Jeff Silverman's user avatar
4 votes

Can one be cruel to nonsentient things?

Certainly! Humans have tendency to anthropomorphize things, including inanimate objects or even non-substantial things. Since, as you pointed out, cruelty requires harmful intent, not just harmful ...
TrayMan's user avatar
  • 141
9 votes

Can one be cruel to nonsentient things?

One conceivable scenario is akin to the impossibility defense in law: Are you guilty of a crime if you are trying to murder an already dead body, convinced they are alive? After all, this is factually ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Can one be cruel to nonsentient things?

Metaphorically, sure, but not literally. Cruelty is an indifference to pain and suffering. Objects like rocks and trees don't suffer pain. Therefore, by definition one can only be cruel to that which ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
3 votes

Can one be cruel to nonsentient things?

If "cruelty" includes abusive behavior, then yes- it happens all the time. My favorite example is the youtube video of a skateboarder who wipes out spectacularly, and then picks up his board ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
0 votes

Kant and the Ship of Theseus

Kant says, in the First Analogy of Experience, that we perceive objects enduring in time, i.e. substances, with only their states changing. He furthermore states that there is a connection of this ...
abracadabra's user avatar
1 vote

Kant and ontological character of the mind

This is an excellent question. It is hard to give an exhaustive answer, given that Kant combines in his writings both strictly empirical considerations and some more a priori concerns and discusses a ...
abracadabra's user avatar
0 votes

What are exactly intuitions in Kant's philosophy?

What Ram Tobolski says is incorrect. He reads into Kant a conception that he was, in fact, explicitly opposed to. An intuition is an representation that directly refers to an object of our sensory ...
abracadabra's user avatar

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