New answers tagged

2 votes

Metaphysical theories for why physics has the structure it has

The immediate answer is that the models we have for predicting reality are the way that they are (really: work the way that they work) because they are approximations to a more fundamental model or ...
g s's user avatar
  • 3,575
1 vote

Metaphysical theories for why physics has the structure it has

The anthropic principle has been formulated originally without reference to the multiverse hypothesis. Namely: If the physical conditions were a bit different, then there would be no intelligent life ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 24.6k
3 votes

Metaphysical theories for why physics has the structure it has

Yes. There are theories that are metaphysical that explain the structure of the universe. One famous philosophical theory is the many world interpretation of quantum mechanics. From WP: The many-...
J D's user avatar
  • 23.1k
0 votes

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

I think the answer would make more sense if we construct a simple analogy. Imagine you have programmed a little simulated universe on your computer, and in your simulation you have a conscious being ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 168
0 votes

Tautological Many Worlds?

The article that you cite does not constitute a proof. It is a weak argument, and badly written. It does make a useful distinction between many worlds and the multiverse. Using the principle of ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 1,994
0 votes

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

I will answer this as philosophical question. It seems to me that the MWI violates the principle of parsimony because it introduces unnecessary complexity. If it does not resolve the issue that it ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 1,994
0 votes

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

No, the populist idea of MWI does not eliminate randomness- it just spreads it across multiple universes. According to MWI, if you were to repeatedly toss a quantum dice, there would be some worlds, ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 13.5k
1 vote

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

This is just a variant of "why am I me and not someone else?". It doesn't matter whether you and the someone else are in the same room, or so far from each other that their observable ...
benrg's user avatar
  • 1,169
2 votes
Accepted

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

The crucial advantage of MWI is not that it eliminates randomness, but that it eliminates the complexity of "wavefunction collapse." The Copenhagen interpretation needs to explain when the ...
causative's user avatar
  • 11.1k
-1 votes

Does Multi-World Interpretation really eliminate randomness in quantum mechanics?

To my understanding, it's exactly the other way around. Since that "randomness" was not so random at the end, God (as an underlying principle of the phenomena) was not playing dice. So in ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
1 vote

What kind of philosophy of the foundations of physics can there be?

Hmmm. I am not a logician, and just the abstract of that link appears to be in a foreign language to me! However, I think I can answer your question anyway. There were two different things that ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 10.6k
0 votes

What kind of philosophy of the foundations of physics can there be?

I have looked at your citation, and think that the topos approach may have merit. I would like to answer your more general question in your second bullet point about the philosophical foundation of ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 1,994
1 vote

Falsifiability of Assumptions

@Bumble gave a great answer on in what sense we can and cannot falsify statistical hypotheses (i.e., things that only become certain in the infinite limit). I'd like to add a meta-consideration that @...
Annika's user avatar
  • 1,409
-2 votes

Falsifiability of Assumptions

The reason that science is based on falsifiability rather than verifiability is that a hypothesis or theory must be tested not confirmed. A null hypothesis is often contrary to the expectation from ...
Meanach's user avatar
  • 1,994

Top 50 recent answers are included