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Regarding whether actuality could precede potentiality, there is this from Heidegger commenting on Aristotle Aristotle says this in his own way in a sentence we take from the treatise that deals explicitly with entelecheia (Meta. , 8, 1049 b 5): fanerin oti proteron energeia dynameis estis: “Manifestly standing-in-the-work is prior to appropriateness for.......


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The essence of moral agency is the capacity to make choices. If we allow someone else to make decisions for us — no matter how wise or intelligent they/it may be — then we sacrifice all moral agency and become (effectively) animals under someone else's control. As human beings, we have a moral obligation to make wise choices. It's one of those cases where it'...


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Moral values are not to be kept in the brain, but to be put into practice. Therefore, when they are implemented, there is a great possibility of deviating from its true path if they stem from inference beyond one's mental capacity. This definitely becomes disappointing. This is what is happening in the case of religions with strict rules and regulations. ...


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You believe in such a thing cause you value it. Even though you can’t see it, you can feel it. You can’t see oxygen, but you BELIEVE you are inhaling it with each breath you take if not not you know you’ll die! You can’t see the wind, but you can feel it. You can’t see Wifi, but you Believe it exist cause you either have bars on your phone for indication or ...


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Yes. We may suppose that the higher moral intelligence knows what is right and says so. (Otherwise, the premise that it is a higher moral intelligence is not met.) Do you have a moral duty to do what is right? If so, then you have a moral duty to do what the higher intelligence says is right, because that is the same as what is right. Let us not ignore the ...


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Argument from authority has a different status in different traditions. Usually frowned upon (maybe not in 'miracles', reliable testimony etc.), but I believe it's said to be sound in Buddhism. A different sort of challenge to the claim that the Buddha valued philosophical rationality for its own sake comes from the role played by authority in Buddhist ...


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The classic experiment illustrating such situations is the Milgram Experiment where subjects were told by someone with apparent scientific "authority" to punish other people with electric shocks. Nevertheless i would argue that in those situations where it matters, the answer is not as easy as saying that we are fully responsible for our own ...


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