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I'd be wary of generalisations about 'religion' that only mean, practices of Abrahamic - and often exclude Islam, for lack of knowledge. Similarly with magic, it's a big topic, with many types of practice and framework. Durkheim focused on the sociological role of religion in defining it: community-binding through sharing of attitudes to sacred things. I ...


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The distinction here is a matter of locus of control/power: Religions grant control/power to a deity or transcendent force, where the adherent is a supplicant. Neither the laity nor the clergy have any power as individuals. The laity strive to achieve an internal state of grace (through proper behavior and attitude); the clergy have (ostensibly) achieved ...


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Well, I respectfully disagree with your statement that "Atheists base their thinking on reason and logic". This is more of a stereotypical answer and viewpoint, which is by no means, statistically, objectively or universally true. You should recognize that there is a diverse representation of Atheists, just as there are diverse representations of ...


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A classic Christian response adapts the ancient Greek concepts of chronos (ordinary, sequential time) and kairos ("proper moment") which, in Christian theology, can be described as "God's time." The idea is that there are certain moments we experience as "timeless," as existing, in some way, outside of ordinary sequential time. ...


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I would say that Atheists, while many of them tend to see themselves as supremely rational and smarter than all others-(when discussing the topic of God), are not necessarily so rational and are by no means, "smarter than all others-(when discussing the topic of God)". The major problem with Atheism and Atheists, is that their entire argument is ...


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There are many fields of philosophy that do not interact with religion at all. For a few examples: Aestetics Logic Heuristics Philosophy of Science Philosophy of Language You could argue that the inverse is not true; that there is no aspects of religion that do not have some type of philosophical importance. This would imply that religion is a subset of ...


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A religion is the codification and institutionalization of a philosophy. Every religion begins with someone teaching some philosophical principle; a moral or ethical worldview meant to help people understand and navigate human life. These teachings are then memorized, written down, expanded, and codified, usually along with practices and interpretations, so ...


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You create a religion when you want a set of beliefs to be seen as true. When you simply have Truth, you don't need religion. And when you don't have Truth, you have philosophies.


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