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24 votes

Is science value-free?

I'm happy to report, that science is a human endeavor, and humans are never value-free, so neither is science. That's a feature, and not a bug. For instance, some of the most important values of ...
J D's user avatar
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16 votes

Is science value-free?

When Harris cites the atomic description of water as being thoroughly value-laden, the two questions that come to mind are If all those hidden, unspecified values he is talking about are removed from ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
10 votes

What were the reactions to Hume's problem of induction from scientists practicing in the field?

I can't speak for people in the 18th century, but there isn't really much for scientists to do about it. The principle of induction has proven to be exceedingly useful for predicting things, and for ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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7 votes

Is science value-free?

This seems to be the quote with some context. "Water is two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen. What if someone says, "Well, that's not how I choose to think about water."? All we can ...
Simon Crase's user avatar
7 votes

Causation in physics equation

Physicists observe correlations. Physical laws explain observations by inventing physical concepts and clarifying their relation. These relations are often causal relations. Physical laws do not deal ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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6 votes

Causation in physics equation

Granted that physicists have always been concerned about causation, I'd take exception to that, most physicist are expressely uninterested in metaphysical questions, at best they try to answer ...
Julio Di Egidio - inactive's user avatar
6 votes

Causation in physics equation

Equations by definition simply equate, so if you state the laws of physics as equations, without any of the associated narrative, then you are not stating the laws of physics! Some equations express ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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6 votes

Is science value-free?

Separately, I'll address this: "Water is two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen" is value-laden. But I don't think that it is value-laden, it is simply a factual statement. Importantly, ...
J D's user avatar
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6 votes

Is science value-free?

Yes, science has values, and specifically they are values of academic inquiry. First there is the value that we should seek knowledge with high priority (by no means a culturally universal priority); ...
causative's user avatar
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6 votes

Does Popper's falsifiability criterion hold any utility?

Quoting from Section I of the introduction to "Realism and the Aim of Science" by Popper: The problem of demarcation is to find a criterion that permits us to distinguish between statements ...
alanf's user avatar
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5 votes

Is science value-free?

This answer replies only to this part: But I don't think that it is value-laden, it is simply a factual statement. It's both. Given appropriate definitions of water, hydrogen, oxygen, parts, and ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,175
5 votes
Accepted

Does Popper's falsifiability criterion hold any utility?

I understand that Popper's falsifiability criterion is meant to demarcate science from pseudoscience. But, is that all one can expect from it? Falsifiability allows more generally to distinguish ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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4 votes

Is science value-free?

Sam Harris (sigh…) Science is designed to be value-neutral. I mean that literally: the motivation behind trying to establish a scientific method was to separate out human desires by testing against ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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4 votes

Is science value-free?

Science is not value free You said it yourself. You said that water is to parts hydrogen and one part oxygen - you have made a leap of faith based on your values. You believe that a measurement of ...
Stian's user avatar
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4 votes

Does Popper's falsifiability criterion hold any utility?

Falsificationism at best provides a demarcation between mature scientific theories and other theories. Even if the multiverse isn't currently falsifiable, it is clearly science - it is part of the ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
4 votes

How do you respond to this common critique of American Pragmatism?

There are two main replies I think are important to point out: In pragmatism, a truth is an assumption that has predictive value when acting upon it. We know from experience that acting upon that ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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3 votes

Nature of objects and their location in space

Firstly, you need to distinguish classical from quantum objects, since the latter don't always have clear-cut locations. Sticking with classical objects, you will confuse yourself if you consider that ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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3 votes

Why Do Magnetic Field Lines Point Clockwise Around a Current?

Consider the magnetic field, the vector B, originating from a wire of infinite length with constant current density, the vector j pointing in positive z-direction. Then the vector B lies in the (x,y)-...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Why Do Magnetic Field Lines Point Clockwise Around a Current?

Static magnetic fields have their characteristic shape because of (described mathematically by) Ampere's Law. Ampere's law is empirical; it was inferred from data, not derived from more fundamental ...
g s's user avatar
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3 votes

Are there any philosophies related to different structures of organization of information?

Organizing knowledge is part of library and information science. It's not atypical for a librarian to do graduate work in the topic, so I presume there's quite a lot of things to know about the ...
J D's user avatar
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3 votes

Are there any philosophies related to different structures of organization of information?

There are people who have knowledge of how to structure information. They tend to be people who have experience of managing information in the real world, such as computer programmers. That laws of ...
alanf's user avatar
  • 7,994
3 votes

Is science value-free?

Absolutely, this is a thought-provoking question. Philosophers like Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn have explored the philosophy of science, emphasizing that while scientific facts, such as the ...
Ryan Smith's user avatar
3 votes

Causation in physics equation

In classical physics every state evolved from the previous state. This is called determinism and it means that every state was caused by a sequence of previous states. By this principle you should be ...
Javatasse's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes

Does Popper's falsifiability criterion hold any utility?

I mean I do not care about science, but the values it holds, like explanatory power and predictability, many of which can also provided by unfalsifiable statements Not really, that's kinda the point. ...
haxor789's user avatar
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2 votes

What were the reactions to Hume's problem of induction from scientists practicing in the field?

The claim that science was not actually based on induction, but actually on falsifiability, was not first brought up by Karl Popper. It dates back at least to Blaise Pascal: In order to show that a ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes

A question about the Notion of Limits in Mathematics

When we say ( \lim_{x \to x_0} f(x) = k ), are we implying exact equality or merely approaching? The terms of the sequence approach... the limit. Yes, it is an/the exact value. Formally, the ...
Julio Di Egidio - inactive's user avatar
2 votes

Are there any philosophies related to different structures of organization of information?

This is an interesting question. Although data storage, indexing and retrieval is a modern phenomenon, probably not covered by classical philosophy, the question of access to the data (information) is ...
TheMatrix Equation-balance's user avatar
2 votes

How do you respond to this common critique of American Pragmatism?

I'm not sure labelling pragmatism as 'anti-epistemological' is the best approach here. Pragmatism is anti-idealist or anti-Platonic; or perhaps better put it's Bayesian, not normative. It certainly ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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1 vote

Does any interaction necessarily imply emergence in physics and chemistry?

A general method in science is to isolate the object under consideration from the “rest of the world” – as far as it is possible. Then one first studies the isolated objects, and later the interaction ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33k
1 vote

Does any interaction necessarily imply emergence in physics and chemistry?

Another way of wording this question is, are there interactions which DON'T produce emergent behaviour? To which I would say, probably not, with the possible exception of very very weak interactions - ...
TKoL's user avatar
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