13 votes

What Would Be the state of philosophy of Science if There were no patterns in nature

If there were no patterns in nature, there would be no humans around to observe it. Think about it, your very ability to exist in a persistent way requires certain regularities. If nature truly had NO ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 892
9 votes

What are appropriate limits to good faith?

Anecdote I once took a masters level class in advanced electronics. The professor specialized in biomedical instruments. He had completed many research projects for the military and the medical ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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8 votes

What are appropriate limits to good faith?

I would say, whether you're a scientist or not, your obligation to take seriously ideas that are extremely unorthodox (like Homeopathy) depends largely on your role in relation to the unorthodox idea. ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 892
6 votes
Accepted

What Would Be the state of philosophy of Science if There were no patterns in nature

Your question is rather meaningless, since in a world with no patterns whatsoever, humans would not exist. However, putting that petty criticism to one side, if there were truly no patterns, then you ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
6 votes

Is Psychology a Science? And the Testability Principle

Yes, psychology is a science. Anyone who knows anything about psychology research should agree. Psychology follows the exact same principles of science as essentially every other scientific field. The ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 7,117
5 votes

What are appropriate limits to good faith?

Unfortunately the history of science and of mathematics shows that good faith is a deceptive strategy. I remember some years ago the announcement of a proof of the Riemann hypothesis in mathematics. ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Does paradoxes in a theory mean that the theory is incorrect and should be discarded?

A paradox is a situation which does not seems plausible, “a statement that runs contrary to one's expectation”. Further investigation may show that it is indeed an antinomy, i.e. it produces a logical ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

You mean something like this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_men_and_an_elephant Where all the blind men come away with a different interpretation of what an elephant is, the interpretations ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 5,450
3 votes

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

It is a characteristic of the Bhagavadgītā to make so many different, mutually contradictory statements. From the beginning the text occupies all key-concepts and traditional Hindu values. They are ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Could “synchronicities” be definitively explained? How so?

I think these synchronicities is the reason why so many of us believe in God/heaven/spiritual world — otherwise we would not, borrowing from Pierre-Simon Laplace, “require that hypothesis”. ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
2 votes

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Generally when used, scientific observation refers to the empirical apprehension of things in the world classically through sense data, though there are objections to objective notions of sense data ...
J D's user avatar
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2 votes

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

It depends on what you mean by "observable". Distant stars and bacteria are unobservable by the human eye. Then microscopes and telescopes are invented, and suddenly both those things become ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
2 votes

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

Yes, yes, and yes, because correctness is a value, not a fact. People make a choice on the standards of what is correct, and therefore choose what is correct often on the basis of what benefits them. ...
J D's user avatar
  • 24.9k
2 votes

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

can there be a theory/framework which can be interpreted in many mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct ways ? It depends what we use "correct" to mean... If we use "correct&...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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2 votes

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

I think this concept is known as "the two sides of the same coin". Or, perhaps, a better metaphor -- a cylinder: Looking from one angle, a person claims that they are looking at a blue ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
2 votes

Is Psychology a Science? And the Testability Principle

If you watch some experiments with monkeys doing tasks and rewards granted, it becomes clear they understand and insist on "equal pay for equal effort". Genetically ingrained. Equal pay ...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
2 votes

What is the underlying critique Quine is making with his underdetermination thesis?

The Quine-Duhem Thesis was proposed by Quine as a critique of Popper's Falsificationism criteria for science. IF every hypothesis is infinitely patchable, THEN it is impossible in principle to falsify ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 11.9k
1 vote

Mutually contradictory but simultaneously correct

Contradictory claims cannot both be correct; A and not-A is always false. However, because false premises may lead to true conclusions, so may contradictory claims. One place where one can find ...
g s's user avatar
  • 5,110
1 vote

What are appropriate limits to good faith?

Things that might need to be considered (not complete) in this pursuits might be: Time Potential Compatibility Applicability Success of the Theory Popularity Evidence Trust The first and most ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 5,450
1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

"Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?" You also ask about the distinction between "logically unobservable and physically unobservable". ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
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1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Broadly speaking, I understand your three classes of unobservable things as follows, using slightly different names and characterizaions: Logically unobservable: These are concepts which cannot have ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 28.4k
1 vote

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

'Causality' is really just a way of constructing narratives, and we tend to like doing that about subjects. Physics often has situations where multiple outcomes could happen, like systems with high ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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1 vote

Are there any conserved properties in causation?

According to current mainstream theories of physics, the following are always strictly conserved: mass/energy, charge, momentum and angular momentum. There is a logical reason for that: Noether's ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
1 vote

Is there any theory or postulate accepted in science that isn’t based on novel testable predictions?

Actually, having testable predictions may not be the main reason we come up with scientific theories. String theory, for example, was being actively developed over decades, even though it remains a ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
1 vote

What Would Be the state of philosophy of Science if There were no patterns in nature

The second step of scientific method is to propose a hypothesis based on all collective observations and the third step is to verify/falsify the hypothesis with more observations, But In a World where ...
John Bollinger's user avatar
1 vote

What Would Be the state of philosophy of Science if There were no patterns in nature

In order to clarify how such an environment could look like, imagine that we humans would live in clouds of water vapor. Then the environment would be permanently changing, without any stable ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 28.4k
1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

As is very often the case in seemingly deep and grandiose statements about physics, this one is utterly boring. The truth is usually boring. You get to deep, exciting and counterintuitive truths on ...
g s's user avatar
  • 5,110
1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Cosmologists have no problem with the idea that the universe extends beyond the observable universe (but unobservable because the universe has not been in existence for long enough for light from ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
1 vote

Does any philosophy define 'existence' such that unobservable things exist?

Is there a flavour of philosophy where the particle would be considered to exist before it is observed? when you say about a particle that existed before it is observed, you indirectly imply the ...
SonOfThought's user avatar
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