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Indeed as you conceived, it's very hard for physicalism to ground continuity of personal identity as wiki reference here: One concept of personal persistence over time is simply to have continuous bodily existence. However, as the Ship of Theseus problem illustrates, even for inanimate objects there are difficulties in determining whether one physical body ...


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I would start by saying, just to clarify slightly, that I think that speaking of logical causation is misleading, as (it is explained by other answers) "because" is not a truth operator. (Hence logical necessity works better.) Wittgenstein famously states that (Tractatus Logico Philosophicus, proposition 5.1361) : "The events of the future ...


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Contemporary constructor theory first sketched by David Deutsch may fit your requirement according to reference here: Constructor theory is a proposal for a new mode of explanation in fundamental physics, first sketched out by David Deutsch, a quantum physicist at the University of Oxford, in 2012. Constructor theory expresses physical laws exclusively in ...


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As to your question regarding the dependence of logical laws upon physical laws, you may have a look at Gonseth, La logique comme physique de l'objet quelconque ( " logic as physics of any object whatever") whch is briefly reviewed here : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-symbolic-logic/article/abs/gonseth-f-la-logique-en-tant-que-...


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Yes, it is flawed. Polyani is saying that examining the physics of a clock can never tell you the principles of its operation or its ability to accurately keep time. This is false. If we know the physics of the clock (or any other machine) at the level of atoms, we can deduce from this the simplified principles of the clock's operation. The minimum ...


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