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1 vote

Can the laws of physics rule out disembodied minds?

Since the laws of physics says nothing about minds, it can't say anything about embodied minds, never mind disembodied minds. Physicalists, who view everything as physics as the ground of everything, ...
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0 votes

Do fundamental concepts in physics have any logical basis?

The philosophical foundations for physics, presently, that I can imagine at the moment, is that reality is consistent and that observers aren't being tricked. Pretty shaky, indeed, however, there is a ...
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1 vote

Can the laws of physics rule out disembodied minds?

The very short answer is "no". Neither the article, nor physics, rule out the existence or agency of Gods. Somewhat Longer Answer: The author is trying to stake out a very peculiar position....
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1 vote

Can the laws of physics rule out disembodied minds?

This sounds just like a person who is prefacing his beliefs by adding the sentence "Physics teaches that..." to give his beliefs more credence. There is the rather gaping issue of ...
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0 votes

Can the laws of physics rule out disembodied minds?

My first doubt regarding this questions is whether physics rule in embodied minds. I think you will have to add other subjects for doing so. If this is true I can't find any significance to this ...
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0 votes

What is the most probable AI?

Tangents There are a couple of mistakes in your premise which aren't pertinent to the question you're asking; I feel the need to address them to begin with. in order to function, even for a very ...
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0 votes

Can the laws of physics rule out disembodied minds?

We can say as Sean Carroll does that God Is Not A Good Theory. There are two sources of issues that I think will prevent any final, totalising resolution here though. (1) On the religious side, the ...
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3 votes

Is philosophy useful in physics?

There is a famous aphorism credited to Richard Feynman: "Philosophy of science is as useful to scientists as ornithology is to birds". Of course Feynman liked to exaggerate in order to ...
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1 vote

Is philosophy useful in physics?

Einstein credited Hume for helping him free his mind about temporality and also Mach for focusing his attention on the source of inertia. Constructivism was a philosophical view about what constitutes ...
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3 votes

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

An engineer does not view a theory from the viewpoint of whether its predictions are 100% correct to the utmost limit of precision. Instead, an engineer judges a theory based on the question, "...
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1 vote

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

Your question tacitly assumes that, because our physical theories cannot predict the behavior of objects to perfect precision, those theories are wrong. That conclusion is intuitive, but in fact need ...
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1 vote

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

A Theory of Everything would require knowledge of everything for it to be a correct theory. So, by this reasoning, all theories are wrong until the knowledge of everything is achieved.
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2 votes
Accepted

Unique-ness in the languages of Math and Physics?

The sort of example you provide is based on the idea of a normal form. "In a rewriting system, a term is said to be of normal form if it does not admit any further rewrites." source When we ...
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3 votes

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

Every physical theory may be either wrong or incomplete. This is because mathematics is used as a language to describe physics and we have Gödel's incompleteness theorems But this is just to say that ...
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33 votes

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

It is not a coincidence that you ask this here at philosophy SE, and not over at physics: The vast majority of physicists would simply reject your question and readily admit that their theories are ...
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35 votes

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

Asimov's "The Relativity of Wrong" has a lot to say about this. John, when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical, they were wrong. ...
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1 vote

We know Classical Mechanics is wrong. But can we also say every other theory is wrong except the Theory of Everything?

Each theory in natural science has a bounded domain of validity. I consider this a basic insight, well-known to each working scientist. A 'Theory of Everything' does not exist. The term contradicts ...
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1 vote

On the connection between science and reality

I don't remember which one, but I think it was Special Relativity that Einstein formulated purely on the basis of thought and did not keep anything to fit observed reality. Far from it! The theory ...
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1 vote

A terrifying variant of Boltzmann's brain

Boltzmann brains are still talked about by prestigious physicists and philosophers so I don’t know why people are dismissing you. Leonard Susskind, Sean Carroll, and David Albert and many others ...
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2 votes

On the connection between science and reality

Science to understand and predict reality First, we observe that objects near Earth's surface accelerate downwards at some degree. Then, through various experiments and measurements, we come to ...
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4 votes
Accepted

On the connection between science and reality

I agree with you than one can extend a series of why-questions and corresponding answers to infinite length. At which point should one stop? Usually one stops when one has obtained a physical theory, ...
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1 vote

A terrifying variant of Boltzmann's brain

I would like to give a different answer to this question. A Boltzmann brain is a brain that has formed by chance (probability theory does not forbid that). Many things may be formed by mere chance, ...
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5 votes

On the connection between science and reality

I don't remember which one, but I think it was Special Relativity that Einstein formulated purely on the basis of thought and did not keep anything to fit observed reality. This is false. There were ...
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4 votes

On the connection between science and reality

Caveat There are some different metaphysical positions on the universe. Some have the belief the universe is a hologram, and others say it's a simulation; some believe in multiple universes. My ...
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