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2 votes

How do physicists talk about spin of individual particles when the universe is massively entangled?

Two cents. I would say that the answer is that both entanglement and dis-entanglement happen at various times, places and ways as the wavefunction(s) evolve. For example, decoherence might act as both ...
Nikos M.'s user avatar
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2 votes

How do physicists talk about spin of individual particles when the universe is massively entangled?

The short answer is that the Universe isn't massively entangled with itself in the way you imagine, and particles can have measured properties such as spin or position, notwithstanding the fact that ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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4 votes

How do physicists talk about spin of individual particles when the universe is massively entangled?

You can specify (make predictions about measurements pertaining to) the state of one part of an entangled system. If you know how it's entangled, measuring the state of one part lets you know the ...
g s's user avatar
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2 votes

How do physicists talk about spin of individual particles when the universe is massively entangled?

I think what you might be confused about is how it stems from the fact that entanglement is a phenomena that arises from a process. The idea of quantum entanglement is just how particles act as if ...
How why e's user avatar
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1 vote

How does mathematical atomism do away with the classical conception of man?

Frankly speaking, I'm not sure to fully understand waht "Galileo rejection of the classical view of man" means... We can see a modern commentary into H.Floris Cohen, The Scientific ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
1 vote

Is David Deutsch correct in stating that the Copenhagen interpretation of QM has few defenders left?

Carlo Rovelli has an update of the Copenhagen Interpretation that plugs some of its gaps called Relational QM. This supposes that it is not just a classical measuring apparatus which is an observer, ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
2 votes

Is David Deutsch correct in stating that the Copenhagen interpretation of QM has few defenders left?

I learn from the answer of @Dcleve that Deutsch is not correct with his estimate about the degree of acceptance of the Copenhagen interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (QM). But the percentage of ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Is David Deutsch correct in stating that the Copenhagen interpretation of QM has few defenders left?

The 2011 survey, which was of just 33 physicists, showed Deutch was asserting a falsehood. The 2016 survey, with a larger survey population of 149 participants, likewise showed a plurality for ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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2 votes

Is David Deutsch correct in stating that the Copenhagen interpretation of QM has few defenders left?

I can, as a lay person interested in qm, try to explain some of David Deutsch words, hopefully successfully: First of all, Copenhagen is taught by default at universities - they teach it as if it's ...
TKoL's user avatar
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2 votes

Is David Deutsch correct in stating that the Copenhagen interpretation of QM has few defenders left?

Upon what evidence would you expect an answer to be based? Who would qualify as a bona fide 'defender'? Would you confine the role of the defence of Copenhagen to physicists specialising in quantum ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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2 votes

Why things don't happen all at once?

We don't know why. We have determined the speed of light through observations and experiments, but we don't know why the speed is what it is, or why the Universe is the way it is. The only part of ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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0 votes

Does free will require an event to occur without a predecessor (thereby violating causality)?

My one cent. The simple answer is no, libertarian free will does not violate causality. In fact a form of causality is absolutely necessary for free will to be meaningful. Else what point would there ...
Nikos M.'s user avatar
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