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This part of the Phaedo is teasing out a philosophical nuance, namely the distinction between (what I would call) metrics and objects. You can see Socrates setting that up around 103b, where he says: You have bravely reminded us, but you do not understand the difference between what is said now and what was said then, which was that an opposite thing came ...


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Plato is filled with contradictions, particularly in the Socratic dialogues, and they are generally intentional. The goal is to shock your mind out of ordinary ways of thinking. In this case, Socrates is drawing a contrast between the objects of the ordinary world, which can seemingly partake in opposite qualities, and the greater reality of the conceptual ...


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With regard to Rabbi Yehuda Hallevi's criticism of Aristotle, I doubt that he is writing it specifically with Timaeus in mind. He did know Plato's doctrines (he alludes to the tripartite soul in 3:5), but from what I understand, the Arabic-speaking world knew Timaeus from translations of Galen's summaries of it; I am not sure whether this particular passage ...


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