Hot answers tagged

10

I'm not sure Plato directly answers this question, but the dialogs clearly suggest the answer is yes. Plato frequently uses the metaphor of traveling closer or further away from the divine, immortal realm of perfection sometimes characterized as the Realm of the Forms. For example, in the "Allegory of the Cave", from The Republic, the mental journey ...


7

Welcome, Delforge Heraclitus and constant change - a vexed question THE thought of Heraclitus of Ephesus is still often summarized as " All things are flowing ", panta rhei; by which it is inferred that everything is in constant change. This summary goes back ultimately to Plato, who at Cratylus, 402a, wrote as follows: " Heraclitus says ...


5

Eudaimonia, happiness, and well-being The standard definition of eudaimonia used to be that it denotes happiness. In recent decades a more satisfactory rendering has been found in notions such as those of well-being and human flourishing. These are far better than the older, 'happiness'. 'Happiness' suggests a merely pleasant and enjoyable state or ...


4

Welcome Louis The passage you are looking for is Republic, V. 460C: ‘removed from sight into some secret and hidden place’ (T. Griffith, Plato: The Republic, Cambridge: CUP, 2000: 158). The passage is odd in at least one respect. As Patterson comments: ‘Infanticide or exposure seems to be the intent, but why the cryptic language?’ (Cynthia Patterson , ‘&...


4

When the Soul wants to experience something she throws out an image in front of her and then steps into it. Meister Eckhart There's an issue with your question. You say "his soul" ie "Plato's soul". Analogous to Plato's arm Plato's head Plato's Greek passport (so to say) Plato's wife even Plato's mind All these suggest something subsidiary to something ...


4

Welcome, Touchdown. I think the passage to which you refer is not exactly 'Right at the beginning' but occurs at the end of Rep. VII.541a: Let them send everyone in the city over the age of ten into the countryside. Then they can isolate these people's children from the values they hold at the moment - their parents' values - and bring the children up ...


3

Long comment The first point to note is that Plato's analysis of "love" is in terms of properties, while today it seems more natural to speak of a relation (like e.g. "x is Father of y"). Thus, "love is "of" that which it desires" means that the lover loves the loved (because he desires him/her). This is, IMO, the reading of the statement "that love is "...


3

Some priests and priestesses who have thought a great deal about explaining their concerns, say that our souls are immortal. A soul will come to an end which is called dying, but at another time be born again, so it never perishes. Since each soul is immortal, each of us has already seen the things you talk about, and actually has acquired knowledge of all ...


2

The passage is from Parmenides, 132a-b. The line of argument is reasonably clear but I am less clear about the soundness of Parmenides' critique. Parmenides' statement of Socrates' argument for the Forms When a number of things - particulars - have a common predicate ('good', 'beautiful', 'square' for instance), there is a single, determinate property ...


2

I don't think we can or should set aside the demands of the ideal society, given that Socrates explicitly makes reference to the ideality of the city in several junctures where he's being pressed about the possibility of instantiating such a city. Moreover, the discussion of the just city is explicitly couched as an analogy for the discussion of the just ...


2

I confine my remarks to Plato, who dominates your question Plato, Aristophanes & the Symposium Plato does not identify himself or the Platonic Socrates with Aristophanes' view. Aristophanes was a comedic playwright and he is here represented as in humorous mood, engaging in a jeux d'espirit. The story of the original three sexes and of Zeus' bipartition, ...


2

No, Plato did not learn anything new about forms during his life on earth. According to Plato, he learned everything about forms when dwelling in a pre-existent form in the realm of forms. Moving around in the realm of forms, he became familiar with forms by intuition - a mysterious capability, described by Plato using a metaphorical language. Plato did ...


2

I can't vouch for the source, but here's one quote... This is the kind of medical provision you should legislate… provide treatment for those of your citizens whose physical constitution is good. As for the others, it will be best to leave the unhealthy to die… According to the article, "Plato wished to rid the population of people with ...


2

Looking at the philosophy expounded by Plato, one thing comes to mind: the Ideas, set in another realm, above the material, quite abstract. Thus, it could mean that the raised index finger points to this very realm of Ideas, where the highest principles of virtue lie and to which one must aspire. A similar explanation goes for Socrates, to which we can add ...


2

Taking Wikipedia's citations as a starting point, I looked for the judgments of Minos in the secondary literature that I was able to locate. The stylistic criticisms are that Minos is "too stylistically crude, philosophically simplistic, and too full of just plain bad argument to be a work of Plato" (Lewis, "Plato's Minos", summarizing the case against ...


2

As the term 'idealism' is used in epistemology and metaphysics there is nothing common and distinctive to all forms of idealism except the claim that reality is non-physical. This accommodates Berkeleley's view that all that exist are immaterial minds and their ideas. It also fits with Plato's theory of Forms, where the Forms are pure essences (e.g. the Form ...


2

This part of the Phaedo is teasing out a philosophical nuance, namely the distinction between (what I would call) metrics and objects. You can see Socrates setting that up around 103b, where he says: You have bravely reminded us, but you do not understand the difference between what is said now and what was said then, which was that an opposite thing came ...


1

Plato is filled with contradictions, particularly in the Socratic dialogues, and they are generally intentional. The goal is to shock your mind out of ordinary ways of thinking. In this case, Socrates is drawing a contrast between the objects of the ordinary world, which can seemingly partake in opposite qualities, and the greater reality of the conceptual ...


1

With regard to Rabbi Yehuda Hallevi's criticism of Aristotle, I doubt that he is writing it specifically with Timaeus in mind. He did know Plato's doctrines (he alludes to the tripartite soul in 3:5), but from what I understand, the Arabic-speaking world knew Timaeus from translations of Galen's summaries of it; I am not sure whether this particular passage ...


1

I have struggled with drug and alcohol abuse for nearly 2 decades. Even having been diagnosed with multiple medical issues due to alcohol, which will kill me, did not help me to decide sobriety was important. I was willing to "stay in the cave." I only just recently decided to seriously attempt sobriety. I was on a destructive path that I used as an excuse ...


1

Though any general predicate might correspond to a Form (according to Plato's view at one stage or another), and the question of self-predication might be approached in general, Plato more specifically needs to uphold his view that the Form of the Good is itself good, is "greater in dignity and might" than all other Forms. If he wants to say this, ...


1

The Parmenides section says something about that, i will make a little example Think of all things red, they all share that in common, redness, now, that redness shares something in common with all things red, so a new kind of redness arises, and so on, ad infinitum. when would you end? will you have the correct definition of redness that makes all thing ...


1

There is a very good account here, also included in Pathmarks. From the translator, Thomas Sheehan. See the 1998 section: M. Heidegger: On The Essence and Concept of Physis in Aristotle's Physics The Romans translated φύσις by the word natura. Natura comes from nasci, “to be born, to originate,” as in the Greek root γεν- . Natura means “that which ...


1

Hippias Major's authenticity is not beyond dispute. But for the sake of argument I assume here that it is the work of Plato. It is included in most editions of the dialogues. The source of the proverb, 'All that is beautiful is difficult' or 'Beautiful things are difficult' (chalepa ta kala (Hippias Major, 304e) is not evident. It may have no identifiable ...


1

I think it is a mistake to correlate the analogy of the chariot and two horses exactly with the Republic's tripartition of the soul. In the Phaedrus: All three capacities, and not only a rational part of the soul, are given an essential and positive role in striving toward the good and the beautiful, and each capacity is represented as having ...


1

No it is not stupid. So far it goes, it is right about Kant. As to Platonism in philosophy of mathematics, people give widely different definitions, often explicit that they do not mean to describe Plato's own view. So anything you say about that is likely to be right according to someone's understanding of the term.


1

The Republic - a provisional account of the soul (psuche) : complex or simple One point useful to note is that provisionality hangs over the Republic. The Sun, Line and Cave, for example, are similes or analogies in place of what Plato aka Socrates would prefer, if only he were able, to specify exactly. Just the same provisionality informs the account of ...


1

Plato and the rules for marriage Plato's regulations on marriage principally apply to the guardian class, the philosopher-rulers. We need to distinguish two senses of marriage in the Republic. These senses are not to be distinguished by specific terminology but by the natural sense of words in context. In the first place, the active guardians, who attain ...


1

Socrates spoke of eupraxia. Eudaimonia, a theme among others in Aristotle (I make this remark because Cicero who was exhaustively informed about Athenian philosophies payed no serious attention to the now famous Nicomachean Ethics, which, in our own time, along with the Politics is considered Aristotle's chief work), is said on an analogy with the state of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible