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1

Philology and historical sources. See e.g. T.H. Irvine, The Platonic Corpus, into Gail Fine (editor) The Oxford Handbook of Plato (2008, Oxford University Press): six works [are] listed under "spurious" [De Iusto, De Virtute, Demodocus, Sisyphus, Eryxias, and Axiochus]. In addition to the six recognized spurious works, other works are "...


1

There is no textual evidence which shows any early Greek Philosopher-(from Thales to Epicurus) quoting or commenting on The Old Testament. Both Pythagoras and Plato were reported to have traveled to Israel and the greater Middle East, though there is no reliable textual evidence which proves this. It is certainly in the realm of possibility that Pythagoras ...


2

The short answer is definitely, and this is widely recognized. However, the influence was not direct and it is perhaps less accurate to cite Plato specifically than to refer to a Platonic and Stoic milieux in which the Hebrew scriptures "mingled" with Roman Stoicism and its Socratic lineage. The relevant hermeneut here would be St. Augustine, who ...


2

I would like to reecho Mr. Gudeman's comments in the following areas: "The notion of God creating Man in his own image", is purely Biblical in origin, specifically, from The Book of Genesis, which "predates" both Christianity and Plato by several thousand years. Plato lived between the years, 427-347 BC/BCE and his Academy stood in ...


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This is from the dialogue titled Sophist, the Fowler translation at perseus.tufts.edu gives it as: No one should be discouraged, Theaetetus, who can make constant progress, even though it be slow. And the Jowett translation at Project Gutenberg translates it as: Any one, Theaetetus, who is able to advance even a little ought to be of good cheer And in ...


0

The word, "gnosis", can have a variety of contexts and meanings, though it tends to be used in a more profound and deeper context. "Gnosis", is more akin to a word, such as awareness-(i.e. The Delphic inscription, Socrates). The word, "Episteme", is actually, the Greek word for Science. The Modern Greek word for University is, &...


1

First of all, ideas are entirely dependent on brain processes. You have a pattern of neural activity which can be interpreted as an idea, in the same way that a pattern of water molecules can be interpreted as a crashing wave (if it has the right arrangement). The mind is not the same as the brain; the mind is an abstract model of a part of what the brain ...


1

Here's my take from Naturalism and physicalism, and minimal or no mind-body dualism All mental activities, which includes forming ideas, are brain processes. A Platonic ideal like a perfect sphere is first an activity in someone's brain. Someone who knew your brain well enough could in principle observe you thinking about a such a sphere. It is a mental ...


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The myth of Plato, author of Socratic dialogues is tenacious and there are various reasons for it. Among them chiefly the propaganda of various moralists who did no like his turning in old age to purely epistemic and even naturalistic problems. No matter how disputable, the chronology of his texts shows just this and Charles H. Khan published in 2013 his ...


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Plato (like Socrates, as depicted in the Phaedrus) thought that philosophy should be an oral practice. Philosophy in dialog is a living thing: sensitive to context and nuance, and giving the philosopher the opportunity to correct misunderstandings and explain subtleties. Philosophy in writing is dead bones, which later readers then try putting flesh and life ...


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SOCRATES: Consider again:—Where there is an agent, must there not also be a patient? SOCRATES: And will not the patient suffer that which the agent does, and will not the suffering have the quality of the action? I mean, for example, that if a man strikes, there must be something which is stricken? If to be punished is to suffer, then there is an agent ...


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