37

In the most trivial sense, they are obviously distinct because morality does not disappear when I enter an area with no laws. Similarly, my personal morality does not change as I move between countries, nor is it necessary that my morality be aligned with some particular body of law. We can also look at instances which are simply outside of the law. If I ...


32

Leaving aside the accuracy of Robin Hood, I'll address your points directly. The first being that if we assume a free market exists... There was no free market in England in Robin Hood's time. The disparity in the usual telling of Robin Hood is due to oppressive taxation by a corrupt usurper. ...regardless of how he redistributes wealth, a disparity ...


30

Disclaimer: I just skimmed a bunch of Wikipedia articles and old stories. I think I got the gist of the history about right, but can't claim this to be authoritative. tl;dr- Robin Hood was never really meant to be a good guy. Instead, he was a brigand who ran a criminal enterprise, much like Al Capone. Early stories noted how the criminal enterprise's ...


26

Some of the answers to these set of questions you raised reside on Mill's principle of harm presented in his influential essay On Liberty (1859). According to this principle, the state can rightfully exercise its power over any citizen in order to prevent harm to others. So, if pornography causes harm to others, it follows, such principle could be justly ...


24

Wanted to register a small framing challenge here with a few tiny notes (please do try to understand this as a good faith attempt to clarify the concern!) It seems somewhat ill-fitting to import any of our contemporary economic concepts onto the feudal context. We can leave aside the early premonitions of a burgeoning mercantilist class capable of acting as ...


20

It's referring to the state, not the land or the people, so your example of a pear isn't really applicable. The preamble of the 1988 charter of Hamas (aka "the Islamic Resistance Movement") declares that "Islam will obliterate Israel." Hamas also officially promotes "the liberation of Palestine" and the raising of "the banner of Islam over every inch of ...


19

Your question is a revival of the classic debate between Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. Should we obey even corrupt governments, or should we revolt and create a new government? From the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: To have a political obligation is to have a moral duty to obey the laws of one's country or state. On that point there is almost ...


16

They must be different! Otherwise, there would be no such thing as an unjust law. I would not want to be there when the person who claims that legal obligation and moral obligation are one and the same tries to explain this to anyone who has engaged in civil disobedience or who has escaped from government-sanctioned oppression. I would not want to be ...


13

The dominant ideology of the Republican Party is known as American conservatism, and it was developed by William F. Buckley and his magazine National Review starting in the 1950's. The founding mission statement of National Review (see "The Magazine's Credenda" at the end) is a good elucidation of this philosophy. It is formed from two strands: ...


13

Though user @JordanS has delivered an excellent, well-informed synoptic answer, more can be said. First, the question is appallingly American, by which I mean historically provincial. The state can prohibit pornography or anything else because it is "the state." The "state" is not to be confused as an entity with the government, the people, the nation, the ...


13

While this is not a philosophy question, it raises a few points. First, I don't personally know of any version of Robin Hood where he takes from riches who got rich because of their cunning and entrepreneurship. Usually they are rich because they harass peons with taxes that are justified by no service (as opposed, for exemple, to tax paid against police ...


12

In addition to the conflicting "duties" to friend and law, there is a third duty to yourself, both as a duty to your principles and a duty to those who depend on on you. The case of Antigone correctly raised by John Am and famously discussed by Hegel has a few complexities. She dies, causing other deaths and bereavements as well. Nor does she seem to ...


11

The reason Israel demands that the Palestinians recognize Israel's so-called "right to exist" is that in so doing, they would officially relinquish any and all claims they have on the land they owned before Israel was founded and from which they were evicted by the Israelis in 1948. They naturally refuse to relinquish those claims because to do so means ...


10

First, I have read only secondary works on Rawls and have not read "Theory of Justice" itself, but it is on my list. Unlike Rand, Rawls was an analytic philosopher with a distinguished background, and was among the first to propose ways in which the Anglo-American tradition could revisit "value" questions such as justice, which had long been proscribed by ...


9

There's several ambiguities in your question that an answer needs to address. First, I am going to assume that your uses of "should" refer to moral rather than legal determinations. Otherwise, this isn't going to fit under philosophy. Second, I'm going to answer in terms of applied ethics rather than formal ethical theories. Third, I will following your ...


9

The question is how much well-informed citizens need to be to exercise their democratic rights. The answer depends on theories of democracy. The duty of citizens to be well-informed can be very demanding or not demanding at all. Some theories even require moral duty not to vote. I explain these three views in the following. J.S. Mill's theory can be argued ...


8

Aristotle classified states according to two variables: who holds power? And: in whose interest is it exercised? There are three politically possible answers to the first question (one, some and all:the kingship, aristocracy, and politeia), and two politically possible answers to the second (the holder of power, and everyone). Aristotle treats kingship and ...


8

Natural rights and human rights originally come from different vocabularies. It's not fair to construe natural rights as "simply a less developed and more concise version of what we now consider human rights." First, I want to start by pointing out an important but crucial ambiguity in the term "natural rights." Viz., the problem is that "nature" can mean ...


8

Any chance you're talking about The Road to Serfdom by Friedrich Hayek? I haven't read the above book in ages, but I did stumble across the following on an amazon review of a closely related book named Individualism and Economic Order, which is a collection of several essays: After dealing with the absurd notion of full information, Hayek turns to ...


8

Legal and moral responsibilities are subtly different, even if we presume an entirely just legal system. Legal responsibilities are about the scope of a person's authority. It is illegal for me to murder you because your life is not within the scope of my authority. I cannot trespass on your property because your property is outside the scope of my ...


8

Wikipedia provides a brief history of the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181: Following World War II and the establishment of the United Nations, the General Assembly resolved that a Special Committee be created "to prepare for consideration at the next regular session of the Assembly a report on the question of Palestine." It would consist of ...


8

He was definitely force of good from historical perspective Robin Hood lived in feudal society. According to some versions of the legend, he was disgraced feudal lord (Robin of Locksley). In feudal society all political power and most of the wealth belonged to nobility . On the other hand, majority of population (peasants, serfs) had no political power, ...


8

One might cite as not inherently violent the Faisceau in inter-war (1918-39) France. Les Faisceau The following extract will take us into the subject: Fascism, violence and storm troopers: in the popular mind the three are inseparable. The same could be said, on a more sophisticated plane, of the scholarly discourse on fascism. In an area in ...


8

Welcome, Mimikyu Your second and third paragraphs concern only a remote contingency, as you acknowledge. They are, I think it's safe to say, practically discountable. The position appears to be that you regard the IDF as necessary for the defence of Israel. However, your not serving will not put Israel at risk but it will very likely involve you in (what ...


7

Ideally speaking, a democratic government exists to enforce the will of the people, or at least a majority thereof. (This ideal is not very well fulfilled, but that is another discussion.) If a majority of the people wants pornography to be illegal, the government can and should legislate and enforce this. Of course, in most democracies the majority also ...


7

From a purely epistemological point of view, no, philosophy is not really helpful. If anything, philosophy makes things worse. See this post and this post and the responses to it. From a social point of view, Habermas' idea of "colonization of the life world" helps shed light on the problem and how to potentially solve it, but doesn't offer a full solution. ...


7

Your summary doesn't really match your longer-form thoughts. You seem to have at least two questions here: Supposing Robin Hood had some historical existence, what would have been his goal in taking from the rich and giving to the poor? Any sufficiently ambitious goal is impossible (corollary: any goal that is possible is insufficiently ambitious). Suppose ...


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