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Kant's disjunctive judgement and neoliberalism

Neoliberalism takes it point of departure from Milton Friedmanns evocation of the market as the primary arbiter of the political-economic realm. Its very different from classical liberalism which one ...
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A Foucalt-ian analysis of Gandhi's Satyagraha?

Foucault's thinking here is akin to the Daoist principle that all oppositions define each other. We cannot have a 'left' without a right; we cannot have a 'good' without an 'evil'; we cannot have '...
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Paradox of Plurality as a better idea

The analogy I like to use here is to think about the act of speaking itself. Speaking is composed of two components: syntax (the arrangement of words and phrases to create well-formed sentences in a ...
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Paradox of Plurality as a better idea

No Paradox in Practice There's no real paradox in the political practice or philosophy of pluralism. You conflate two types of rules as a category mistake. One can believe that one has a right to ...
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Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

I think the closest you'll find to an origin is Jean-Jacques Rousseau and his Social Contract theory. Both Hobbes and Locke thought that anarchy was the natural state of mankind — though granted, ...
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Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

The modern term used by political scientists that by metaphor suggests that government is inevitable is 'power vacuum': In political science and political history, the term power vacuum, also known ...
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Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

Aristole argued that the state is a creation of nature due to our (human's) "function" as a political animal. TLDR, a state of some kind is inevitable due to our rational (political) nature. ...
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Is evil neccessary to society?

You see, "Good" and "Evil" are really subjective. Though evil is not necessary for large societies, it is inevitable. Someone might do some act to reach some "good" ...
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Is evil neccessary to society?

There's no objective/absolute good and bad/evil (that is, there is no rule for all the universe that states that destroying a living object is "bad", independently of the existence of human ...
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