Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

New answers tagged

-1

If you observe an event with a previously assessed zero probability, you've just proved something that was previously considered non-prove-able. Does it leads to a contradiction? Yes, and that's completely normal. Probabilities are about our predictions of the future, and the future is unknown. So, that means that in a certain point, we'll always be ...


0

The main problem with the argument is in the first line: So if we have two mutually exclusive and jointly exhaustive hypotheses, with equal prior probabilities, say, evolution and creation ("E" and "C"), and a observation, say, homologies (H) if one of the hypotheses entails the observation, that hypothesis is more likely, given the observation, than the ...


0

Wikipedia defines a probability space as follows: The probability measure P is a function returning an event's probability. A probability is a real number between zero (impossible events have probability zero, though probability-zero events are not necessarily impossible) and one (the event happens almost surely, with almost total certainty). [my emphasis]...


0

Here's a brief definition of Quine's undetermination that I found online: "Underdetermination is a thesis explaining that for any scientifically based theory there will always be at least one rival theory that is also supported by the evidence given, and that that theory can also be logically maintained in the face of any new evidence." Source: https://www....


0

David Corner describes two kinds of miracles. Violation miracles are violations of natural law. However, getting 100 heads in a row does not violate any law of nature. It is merely unexpected. Hence it would not be a miracle. Coincidence miracles are not violations of natural law but they have to be "religiously significant". In this example God predicted ...


1

The famous 1964 paper of John Stewart Bell, in which "Bell's inequality" is established, begins by assuming two things. (The paper can be found here: https://cds.cern.ch/record/111654/files/vol1p195-200_001.pdf) One of them is "locality", which means (non-mathematically) that distant objects cannot affect one another instantaneously. Mathematically, Bell ...


0

Probability is the connection between the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics and experimental observation, data in the real world (it's what gives quantum mechanics the status of a scientific theory). A more appropriate question (for the philosophy section ) is related to the multitude of interpretations of quantum mechanics, but there is not ...


0

Probabilities in quantum mechanics always respect the calculus of probabilities by definition. The square amplitudes of a set of orthogonal states, which are the quantities used to compute probabilities in quantum mechanics, don't always respect the calculus of probability, see: https://arxiv.org/abs/math/9911150


Top 50 recent answers are included