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It either means one of two things: Something very unlikely happened The experiment was flawed Whatever you think a "miracle" is, it's a subset of (2). More likely the coin was weighted or the person flipping the coin somehow cheated. It might mean the universe was programmed to confuse us by a yet-unknown force, which you could consider a miracle....


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I think it would be a poor assumption to say that miracles are solely based on the rarity of an event. Walking on water is considered a miracle (assuming no trickery) due to the fact it's impossible, not because it's rare. It would be subjective. I would say that minds are more interested in combinatorics than permutations (i.e we're more interested in how ...


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Is getting even one head in a row a muscle? If the coin has no reason to exist on it's own, but nevertheless does exist, and follows a set of unknown laws of nature such as gravity which has never been measured or even seen (only it's effects but not it itself) then how can it not be a miracle?


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Whether an event is a miracle or a non-miracle, does it depend on the point of view? No, of course not! -- tho when stated like that, your question kinda implies that we were looking from, yes, different points, but at the same event. Which is not what your example described. In your example, we are looking at two different events: getting a certain result ...


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One issue with this scenario is that I have an overview of everything but in reality don't know how much I am supposed to know. Since I would have to challenge the will on grounds against Aristoteles, it is known that Plato has dementia and has a damaged left hippocampus, therefore at anytime prior to the stated recovery he was without testamentary capacity. ...


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I wouldn't feel bound to defend Plato against a claim that i have no reason to believe is false. Is there any other potentially unseen motive besides fraud that is contended and for which there is evidence? If there was no other apparent benefit for them having kidnapped him, it is logical to assume the motive was the obvious one. If we know Aristotle to ...


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I presume you are concerned with cases where a witness is called to give testimony but there is doubt about whether their testimony is acceptable, because they suffer from dementia and this affects their memory of events. I'm not sure how using Bayes is going to help here. I understand that you are interested in the quantity P(H|J) but I don't see why you ...


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