New answers tagged

0 votes

Does even fixed probability imply no free will?

VERY SHORT ANSWER Yes, you are correct, libertarian free will is not compatible with a probabilistic "law". MUCH MORE COMPLICATED ANSWER You have a lot of suspect assumptions behind your set ...
user avatar
  • 4,126
0 votes

Does even fixed probability imply no free will?

I would rather leave this as a comment rather than an answer but I don't have the 50 required rep to do it. You are touching the problem I have with the concept of free will: If someone's behavior isn'...
user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes

Does even fixed probability imply no free will?

Of course free will works outside the laws of physics. Decision-making is not at all about physics. The probability of an individual choosing right over left is probably more than 50%. Right-handed ...
user avatar
0 votes

Graham Priest's "escape from Hell" puzzle

I have never run into Priest’s puzzle before. This is interesting. I suppose the calculations would go like this: At some point the probability of success rises high enough that, although the odds in ...
user avatar
  • 4,587
1 vote

Graham Priest's "escape from Hell" puzzle

The chapter is just Pascal's Wager and this, under the heading Decision Theory: Great Expectations, yet concludes with "So it looks as though the only rational thing to do is to be irrational!&...
user avatar
  • 1,176
-1 votes

Quantum vs classic dangerous decisions under many-worlds interpretation

There is no difference. All randomness is inherently quantum. The parameters of a coin toss are randomized by the probabilistic inaccuracy in the neural system and the muscles of the person tossing ...
user avatar
-1 votes

Heisenberg, Copenhagen and probability in QM

My own Helsinki interpretation of the Copenhagen interpretation goes like this: Particles exist only as probability waveforms when they are not interacting with other particles. They are not simple ...
user avatar
1 vote

Backwards Bayesian argument for alien visitation?

You have some dubious math here. The first issue is, you equivocate over what "E" is; is E a single piece of evidence, or is it all the evidence together? A second issue is where you do: ...
user avatar
  • 5,759
0 votes

Is there any rigorous definition of just one single random choice?

Philosophically speaking random choice is an oxymoron. Random chance is the very opposite of deliberate choice. Both mean the selection of one option out of many. The difference is that a choice is ...
user avatar
0 votes

Can there only be one success in an infinite amount of trials?

Its completely possible if the infinite trials are not random This is a Math SE question, but it's perfectly possible, and very easy to express mathematically X = 2 You could try an infinite amount of ...
user avatar
7 votes

Is there any rigorous definition of just one single random choice?

I want to try and give an answer to this question from a "objective Bayesian" perspective. Objective Bayesianism is the idea that probability measures should be thought of as corresponding ...
user avatar
  • 572
16 votes

Is there any rigorous definition of just one single random choice?

It's best to think of randomness as a model, not as a 'thing'. When we talk about a 'random event', we mean that at some time t0 we cannot predict with certainty the state of a system at time t1 (t1 &...
user avatar
  • 12.6k

Top 50 recent answers are included