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19 votes

How many Platonic ideals are there?

Although Plato's Theory of Forms presents as a consistent, "scientific" system of metaphysics, it doesn't really hold up under scrutiny, and there's a strong tradition of thought that it was ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
18 votes

Is the Dao a thing or an action?

You are thinking as though things and actions are different -- the Dao reflects the idea (reality?) that they can't really be separated. This might not be the most illuminating example, but a ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 5,338
6 votes

Help understanding this bit of philosophy in this paper

First of all I fear you're overthinking this way too hard. Like computer science often borrows terms from philosophy because both are dealing with the relation between abstract logical entities and ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,658
6 votes

What is Plantinga's "trivial property"?

Plantinga uses the concept of non-trivial properties in his transworld depravity defense of God's benevolence, see How does free will defense of God's benevolence work? Ciprotti in Theological ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
6 votes

Is the Dao a thing or an action?

The short answer is yes. By asking 'a thing or an action' you are asking a question which immediately implies a dualism. The Dao is non-dual. Any attempt at answering with a dualistic answer will ...
Swami Vishwananda's user avatar
5 votes

Is the Dao a thing or an action?

Dao is a label that points at the non-dual, but non-duality is a particularly difficult thing for people to grasp; it goes against the nature of language and conceptualization. when we think or talk ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 20.9k
4 votes

Help understanding this bit of philosophy in this paper

See you're still at it. Good for you. Hoare is a biggy in mathematical correctness strategies in developing software in computer science; he has a logic named after him, and is in the Turing Award ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
4 votes

Can anything be inherently great?

Anselm's argument hinges on the definition of greatness encompassing the assumption that real is 'greater' than imaginary, but otherwise doesn't pin down exactly what great means. On that basis you ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.8k
4 votes

Is it possible to find the opposite of any given "thing"

In addition to David Gudeman's answer which questions the validity of premise 3, I would also question the validity of premise 1. Things in the real world (and in any reasonably interesting ...
Hans-Martin Mosner's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Platonic realism about 'impossible' properties?

Physically impossible forms certainly exist from the point of view of Platonic Realism. Classic examples are perfect circles and triangles on an infinite Euclidean plane. No actual circle or triangle ...
Nullius in Verba's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What does one actually mean by the "state" of an object?

"State" means different things in different situations. When you model the physical world for doing physics, engineering, or other things, you can't possibly model everything about the world,...
David Gudeman's user avatar
3 votes

What are external properties?

The explanation seems to me a little bit blurred... The source is "traditional" logic. See Port Royal Logic: [for] Port-Royal [...] the significance of general ideas has two aspects: the ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
3 votes

Is it possible to find the opposite of any given "thing"

It isn't the case that every property has an opposite, and even if everything did have an opposite, that wouldn't guarantee that every object has a corresponding object with all properties opposite. ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
2 votes

Are Concepts Colorless?

It's been said that "colorless green ideas sleep furiously" but this is nonsensical - possibly poetic. Are Concepts Colorless? Yes, concepts have no color. It would be a category mistake to ...
MmmHmm's user avatar
  • 2,417
2 votes

Why is the problem of universals a problem?

Let me start by saying this, suppose you go outside and see two red apples. The apples are red. The problem of universals is how to account for this datum. When we admit that two things agree in an ...
Dennis's user avatar
  • 326
2 votes

Fundamental properties

A superb question and the easy answer is there may not be such a thing as a fundamental property. Was it Hume (?) who divided properties into the two classes of primary (essential) and secondary (...
Hudjefa's user avatar
  • 3,935
2 votes
Accepted

"Too simple to be simple" (a phrase in category theory) and the concept of absurdity

Is the phrase "too simple to be simple" an example of GAN-talk under the absurditarian(!) interpretation? No. First, a few clarificatory remarks. Later LW in PI used the term "Unsinn&...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Is instantiation of properties causal?

The word 'cause' has a number of meanings. One refers to a physical process through which an effect is produced. In physics and philosophy the word 'causal' is typically used to refer to such ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Would a divine being having properties of multiple orders undermine the point of attributing divine simplicity to this being?

Almost. In any attempt to determine whether a maxipotent entity is characterised by an unending descent of order sets, the issue of inflexive superpotency claims the primary denotation of convertive ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Can anything be inherently great?

Greatness is a difference of increase, so that X is greater in respect to something if X has more of this something than others. The Great Wall of China is greater in size than the wall of the average ...
Mutoh's user avatar
  • 766
2 votes

Category errors and positive properties

The reason why the dog example isn't an actual counterexample is because the infinite ordinal omega, among other ordinals, is both odd and even in some sense per this MathOverflow post: First I'll ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What can a person not categorize in the process of his knowledge acquisition?

Your question can be considered on different levels: Personal: The blind spots are what a person cannot see, and therefore is unable to discriminate. At presence: At each time there are general open ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.8k
2 votes

Can obligations be substances/objects?

Pritchard is wrong to consider the agent to be the obvious candidate upon which to hang the tag of an obligation. An obligation is a form of belief, and it can be held by the obliger as much as the ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.8k
2 votes

Can obligations be substances/objects?

If one takes obligations to be deontic propositions, then it is trivial to argue that such propositions seem to inhabit a metaphysical category of abstract object. The argument: Propositions are ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
2 votes

Is it possible to find the opposite of any given "thing"

Premisse 1 sounds more like a definition, not like a statement. But it doesn't make clear whether or not mathematical things, like numbers, are "things" too -- don't they have properties? ...
mudskipper's user avatar
2 votes

Is it possible to find the opposite of any given "thing"

Although it is possible to take any term X and imagine its anti-term, just by prefixing "anti-" to X, this is not the same as having a distinct opposite of every term. For one, not only are &...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
2 votes

Is it possible to find the opposite of any given "thing"

A property of is a measurable quality of a thing. Measurable qualities can be categorical (2 to N categories) or continuous (having infinitely gradated possible values). The term 'opposite' implies a ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 20.9k
2 votes

Is it possible to find the opposite of any given "thing"

There is a problem with the premise 3. Take for the example of the property (not containing an elephant) that is true of some room or house or instant of time. there is an infinite number of ...
TRUTHS's user avatar
  • 119
2 votes

Difference between Fundamental and Universal Property

A fundamental property is one which cannot be explained by, or grounded in other properties. Thus fundamental properties are the basic properties in nature; charge is one of them. These fundamental ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar

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