New answers tagged

0

Can one have propositional knowledge without knowing the corresponding proposition? Depends on what you mean. We can, I think, have propositional knowledge (non propositional knowledge cannot be expressed in propositions) that is not expressed in propositions. Surely I don't need to know that this is blue, to know this blue (Which is no proposition)? ...


1

It is reasonable to point out that one cannot take a position on this question until one has decided what 'belief' means. A pragmatic definition of a belief is that one believes a proposition if one acts as though it were true, or is aware of a violation when one fails to do so (experiencing surprise, fear or confusion.) In that case, then, yes, one can ...


0

However, proponents (and most opponents) of the knowledge argument use the term "propositional knowledge" in a broader sense, e.g., for the narrowing down of possibilities, whether or not this involves language or symbols. Ignorance may be regarded as the incapacity to exclude possibilities. Knowledge may similarly be thought of as the capacity to exclude ...


2

This is not a definitive answer, but too long for a comment. The OP quote has a footnote listing the "proponents (and most opponents) of the knowledge argument" who take propositional knowledge "in a broader sense". Among the references are Lycan, who is classified by SEP under The New Knowledge/Old Fact View on Mary. According to this view, "what it is for ...


Top 50 recent answers are included