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Wikipedia provides an initial place to look for a definition of psychopathy: Psychopathy is traditionally a personality disorder characterized by persistent antisocial behavior, impaired empathy and remorse, and bold, disinhibited, and egotistical traits. It is sometimes considered synonymous with sociopathy. Different conceptions of psychopathy have been ...


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This is a little tricky, philosophically speaking. Kierkegaard would be inclined to say that almost no one is their 'true self'. For instance, if we have a bricklayer who wants to be an emperor, then that desire to be an emperor — which I'll note derives from a value imposed externally — risks denying the fact that he actually is a bricklayer. But by that ...


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Interpreting Kierkegaard is made problematic by Kierkegaard's strategic use of a pseudonyms as a rhetorical strategy. The book under consideration here, The Sickness Unto Death, was written by Anti-Climacus. Unsurprisingly, Anti-Climacus can be contrasted with Johannes Climacus. Johannes Climacus's main work is Philosophical Fragments. So if we're reading ...


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Andrew Eshleman provides an answer to the first question: given determinism can we be accountable, that is, have moral responsibility. In keeping with this focus on the ramifications of causal determinism for moral responsibility, thinkers may be classified as being one of two types: 1) an incompatibilist about causal determinism and moral responsibility—...


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If we look at the title of the question, which is a surprisingly accurate summary of the body: Does following logic necessarily require one to conclude that they are objective and have no bias? we see that we're looking for the truth value of the proposition one follows logic => one is objective && ~(one has bias) It seems at this point that ...


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Freud does suggest to use the latent to understand the manifest, just as it sounds. It sounds counterintuitive because the "latent" and the "manifest" are not used in the usual sense, they are not the latent and the manifest of the same material. The "latent" is the content that comes from Freud's technique of free association. It is assumed that it reveals ...


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My response to Elliot Svensson, since I'm a newbie and couldn't respond directly to you. Misanthropy, contrary to popular belief, is not the hatred of everybody. It is the general contempt and disdain for the human race. The misanthrope sees the human race as THE problem - destructive, apathetic, egotistical and mostly stupid. Misanthropes acknowledge they ...


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Conjectures are often stated without any knowledge that there might be a proof, and with no intuition about a proof. Conjectures are often wrong. There are many, many conjectures that didn't require any intuition at all. Just a bit of statistics, or heuristics. "It's unlikely to be wrong" is often a good reason to state a conjecture.


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First point: the term 'psychopath' isn't a clinical diagnosis. In the best case it is a loose term for any mental disorder that features destructive, antisocial behavior; in the worst case it's mere pop-psychology meant to explain away social and cultural ills as psychological aberrations. We should keep in mind that almost every psychological diagnosis ...


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I would say that most well-informed books on religion are concerned with identifying mental traps and helping us avoid them. The traps that you mention in the question are for the most part fallen into by believers rather than taught by their Church, and much religious writing is intended to help them escape from such traps. The best 'trap-avoider' I've ...


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I'm not sure that one can in any direct way voluntarily change one's beliefs. I can't decide to believe that my front door is green rather than black; and I can't decide to believe in Papal Infallibility as I might choose to light a cigarette. There are elements of voluntarinesss in belief (as e.g. in self deception) but not, I think, elements that reinforce ...


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This is an ill-posed question. When you refer to infinity ("an infinite number of causes or effects"), you are implying accountability, and that's not a physical fact, but a fact related with our human subjectivity. If you touch a rock pebble with your finger, the pebble moves. But the pebble is not moving due to a single physical action (for example, one ...


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I just wish to add a few thoughts and conceptualizations that came to my mind: As others have highlighted, there is a long debate (a) about determinism, and (b) about the definition of free will, and (c) if free will is compatible with determinism (this position being called 'compatibilism'). (a): Some answers here mentioned that at the micro-level ...


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tl;dr- Ethics modifies the behavior of ethical agents, regardless of determinism. For example, we can still judge a thief for their thievery to the betterment of society even if we choose to describe the thief's agency as 100% determined by physical processes. Analogy: In video games – players have free will; but, characters are determined by ...


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