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Is not The Big Other an imaginary "idea" that has in itself a sort of felt subjectivity and a "voice," a point of view? For example, when I say "America dictates that we strive to achieve our best goals," am I not personifying America, which is here a culturual-social-political-economic entity with a specific point of view that "speaks" to me as if it were ...


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Like Isaiah Trotter said: It's impossible to divorce yourself from your presuppositions, the lack of a belief system is itself a belief system. But I disagree with him in maintaining a neutral ground, I expect some people can keep neutral ground. Having a Dialectic mentality keeps me Neutral, real philosophers are Neutral. We should distinguish between ...


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Welcome, Захар Joe. None of your examples involves a fallacy, which is an error in reasoning. Example of fallacious reasoning: 'If it's raining then the pavements are wet. The pavements are wet. Therefore it's raining.' This is fallacious reasoning because there are many reasons, besides a rainfall, why the pavements are wet. A burst water main might cause ...


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SHORT ANSWER None of the examples you have listed appear to be fallacies. A fallacy is a persuasive, but poorly reasoned argument whose conclusion doesn't follow. LONG ANSWER Not all mistakes or communications that are personal attacks are fallacies. In the examples you cite, there are certainly implications and implicatures. But to be a fallacy, there ...


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Until someone either proves or disproves it, a mathematical conjecture is often named after the person that first proposed it. E.g. Goldbach's conjecture - Wikipedia is still unproven. "Shouldn't we call that a proof in philosphical terms?" No. Just because a mathematician, even a very famous one, made a conjecture, that doesn't prove it is true. For ...


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Conjectures are often stated without any knowledge that there might be a proof, and with no intuition about a proof. Conjectures are often wrong. There are many, many conjectures that didn't require any intuition at all. Just a bit of statistics, or heuristics. "It's unlikely to be wrong" is often a good reason to state a conjecture.


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Poincare on his musings on the mathematical process wrote how when he was trying out a proof on Fuschian functions that he sat at his desk every morning for two weeks trying out innumerable combinations until one morning it came to him as he was stepping off a bus. He felt certain that it was correct and when he, later that morning sat at his desk and wrote ...


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Derrida was a structuralist, and so he's looking for patterns and relationships whereas Freud is interested in the specific, the particular and the concrete which makes sense given he's a dream therapist and so concerned with the therapy of the patient in front of him. The two, however, are inter-related. If ten people came to Freud with the same obsessive ...


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Freud does suggest to use the latent to understand the manifest, just as it sounds. It sounds counterintuitive because the "latent" and the "manifest" are not used in the usual sense, they are not the latent and the manifest of the same material. The "latent" is the content that comes from Freud's technique of free association. It is assumed that it reveals ...


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Few people think more than two or three times a year. I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week. George Bernard Shaw Was Shaw only talking of religious people? The unexamined life is not worth living Socrates Easy to remember that Socrates said this. Harder to remember that he said it at his trial! ie he was ...


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I would say that most well-informed books on religion are concerned with identifying mental traps and helping us avoid them. The traps that you mention in the question are for the most part fallen into by believers rather than taught by their Church, and much religious writing is intended to help them escape from such traps. The best 'trap-avoider' I've ...


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