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The idea that quantum mechanics fundamentally challenges the rules of logic was popular for a while, but has fallen out of favor in recent years. While intuitively it might seem that quantum superposition (i.e something being in more than one base state at the same time) is what challenges the rules of logic, by invalidating the law of non-contradiction, ...


15

Chance is the pseudonym of God when he did not want to sign. - Théophile Gautier came to my mind. It is a view that you can sometimes encounter in the Catholic Thinking. Quantum randomness would be a very effective way to hide for God that would also enable him to have full control of everything. He just need to make it look random. Note that while it ...


12

Let me clarify a confusion first. Logic applies to sentences, not to objects, so object's ability to be in two places at once is not a contradiction, unless definition of "object" rules out such a possibility. It certainly does in classical mechanics, but classical mechanics does not apply to quantum objects that can be "two places at once". And quantum ...


9

Einstein was a proponent of hidden-variable theory. The gist is that, if something appears random, then it's really just chaotically dependent upon information we don't have. So, God (the universe) doesn't play dice. Subsets of it might, but Einstein held that a complete description of the universe would be fully deterministic. Any description reliant on ...


7

First a point of clarification, from what you are describing, you are talking about libertarian freewill, not compatibilist freewill. More on that later. At the heart of your question is a confusion that you need to clarify, then you will understand the second paragraph you quoted better. You are confusing "Determinism" with "Lack of freewill" due to a ...


7

The OP quote draws a distinction between determinism ("hard determinism"), and causal completeness ("less absolute determinism"). The former means that the current physical state of the universe predetermines its future state in every detail, i.e. it is a "sufficient cause", this is the Laplacian view of classical mechanics. The latter means that although ...


6

One of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics is the principle of superposition. Its most simple application reads: If two paths exist to move from state A to state B, then the transition function (psi-function) develops to the final state as the sum of the two separate transition functions. The double split experiment has two different paths from ...


5

If I interpret this correctly you seem to be asking whether some kind of rudimentary form of awareness may be a property of all matter? One person who I think would answer in the affirmative is Graham Harman in his metaphysics of 'polyspychism'. The most clear and complete exposition of his system is called The Quadruple Object, a great introduction can ...


5

"Normal" determinism — or at least, the way that people normally approach the notion of determinism — in the face of apparently random events is the position that the randomness is due to uncontrolled variables in the influences on the apparently random system, which you are not taking into account. A good example would be the brownian motion of ...


5

Delayed choices undermines past to future causality only if one assumes that the initial state of a system must directly determine measurement results, and that wave functions represent our ignorance of an underlying state which is already determined and only revealed by measurements, but there are other interpretations. In sum, the situation is as follows: ...


5

This question presumes not only the existence of common sense, but that two individual's common sense about a very peculiar topic might somehow coincide. As Einstein categorized it, there were four major aspects of a QM interpretation: Realism - Can we predict the future state of a particle without measuring it? Completeness - Does it account for every ...


5

For a rather technical book in philosophy of quantum mechanics and QFT you can read Laura Ruetsche "interpreting quantum theories". You will also find numerous articles there (I link to subject pages, but you can browse the whole site): http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/view/subjects/quantum-field-theory.html http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/view/subjects/...


5

It's an excellent question. Heisenberg thought that QM forced us to modify the tertium non datur rule. So do many scientists. They are wrong, and here's why. The principle of bivalence is not the issue here since it is unnecessary in dialectical logic that all statements are true or false, only that the statements we subject to our logical processes are. ...


4

What today is named many-world interpretation of quantum mechanics goes back to Everett's doctoral thesis 'Relative State' Formulation of Quantum Mechanics, Reviews of Modern Physics. Vol. 29, 1957, p. 454–462 Quoting from this paper: We thus arrive at the following picture: Throughout all of a sequence of observation processes there is only one ...


4

What objections are there to suicide in general, and how do they apply under the Many Worlds Interpretation? Case #2 here hints at the importance of this question. An inescapable fact of suicide is that someone dies, and that this affects those who knew the dead. If you are the one committing suicide, you might not care about the consequences, or — in ...


4

Logic is an abstract concept which does not necessarily directly tie to reality. We like to argue that there is at least a very solid indirect relationship, in that logic does a good job of describing reality and we must implement said logic in reality, but it is an abstract concept. What QM does is shake up the linguistic choices we use when using logic ...


4

On philosophy of renormalization specifically the canonical reference is Cao-Schweber's Conceptual Foundations and the Philosophical Aspects of Renormalization Theory, see also Butterfield's Reduction, Emergence and Renormalization for a more recent take. There is more or less a consensus that the ontologies of quantum field theory are of a transient as-if ...


4

The book "Große Physiker" by Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker deals with this question in the chapter "Platon" pp. 48-72 (which discusses the Timaios dialog), but already the preceding chapter "Parmenides" deals partly with it, because it discusses Parmenides as portrayed by Plato in his Parmenides dialog. But to disappoint you, large parts of what Plato said ...


3

Quantum mechanics does not threaten the rules of logic - that's the positive message. During a short period in the interpretation of quantum mechanics it was discussed, whether a different calculus of logic had to be introduced to interpret quantum mechanics (quantum logic). Today this approach is no longer in the focus. That a particle can be at two ...


3

The way quantum mechanics is commonly discussed makes this a very confusing issue. I will discuss this problem first and then move on to free will. People like to say there are multiple interpretations of quantum mechanics, which have different implications for what is happening in reality. These then claim that these different explanations all have the same ...


3

Superdeterminism isn't much of a philosophical position, like determinism. It is a possible solution to a quantum mechanics theorem that has kinda of profound impacts on our understanding of the universe, namely, Bell's theorem. It suggests maybe the results came from the fact the universe has not a bit of real "freedom". To really get the point, however, i ...


3

I expect you've come across the following: Heisenberg argument for his uncertainty principle took into account the act of measurement in 1927. Specifically, measurement causes a disturbance that it quantifies in terms of the energy carried by the measurement itself - and then one takes a limit. Leo Szilard's solution to Maxwell's demon also revolved around ...


3

The concept of simulation and experiment are not mutually exclusive: When a biologist performs a biochemistry or molecular biology experiment in a lab setting, they are also simulating a process that occurs in Nature. A materials engineer performing stress tests on a new alloy in the lab is simulating the conditions that this alloy will endure when it is ...


3

Of course also philosophers are interested in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. But in general, there task is to collect and to survey the interpretations developed by physicists. E.g., see the book by the philosopher of science Esfeld, Michael: La philosophie des sciences. Une introduction (2009) Well known interpretations of QM have been developed ...


3

Quantum indeterminacy is inextricable from observation because that which we consider to be "quantum indeterminacy" is related to the interpretations of QM rather than the mathematical model behind QM. (I expect this question to get migrated to Physics.SE, because it is really more of a physics question than a philosophy question. When it gets there, I ...


3

This does not follow at all. If you buy the "Doomsday Theory", which argues that statistically speaking, there are likely to roughly be as many people born in the future as have already lived, then you are accepting the idea that we can make accurate predictions of this nature purely on the basis of statistics. It might be false for many reasons, including ...


3

Aristotle already points out in his Metaphysics that some philosophers took chance to be a cause. So in the very early thinking on physics chance wasn't ruled out as a cause. It was ruled out in the modern era due to the success of Newtonian Mechanics that installed strict determinism as a principle of Nature and this was principally due to the influence ...


3

Wikipedia describes quantum immortality or suicide as the following: In quantum mechanics, quantum suicide is a thought experiment, originally published independently by Hans Moravec in 1987 and Bruno Marchal in 1988 and independently developed further by Max Tegmark in 1998. It attempts to distinguish between the Copenhagen interpretation of ...


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