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20 votes

What is unique about the quantum state of superposition?

I recently answered a similar question on physics.SE here. What is special about the probabilities of quantum mechanics is that the randomness cannot be explained by a theory of nature that is both ...
ACuriousMind's user avatar
16 votes

"God doesn't play with dice": does QM's randomness really contradict religion?

Chance is the pseudonym of God when he did not want to sign. - Théophile Gautier came to my mind. It is a view that you can sometimes encounter in the Catholic Thinking. Quantum randomness would ...
user103766's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Philosophical implications of entangled states (and the 2022 physics nobel prize)

In the high-level summary and explanation I've read/watched… this means or confirms that everything… is probabilistic. This is wrong. Bell's Theorem and the experiments that won this years Nobel ...
Sandejo's user avatar
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9 votes

What are the arguments for or against the wavefunction being a subjective vs an objective entity?

In practice the wave function is a mathematical model which we can use to calculate certain properties of systems, subject to a variety of approximations. What the wave function is modelling (ie what ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
8 votes

"God doesn't play with dice": does QM's randomness really contradict religion?

Einstein was a proponent of hidden-variable theory. The gist is that, if something appears random, then it's really just chaotically dependent upon information we don't have. So, God (the universe) ...
Nat's user avatar
  • 1,995
7 votes

Does ones interpretation of quantum mechanics alter one's moral philosophy?

Your question relies too much on there being only two worlds - one where the 1% event happened, and one where it didn't. I think the more reasonable many-worlds interpretation is that out of the ...
kutschkem's user avatar
  • 2,699
6 votes

What is the most commonsense interpretation of QM for the layman?

This question presumes not only the existence of common sense, but that two individual's common sense about a very peculiar topic might somehow coincide. As Einstein categorized it, there were four ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 18.2k
5 votes

How can we take the ontologies of our best physical theories seriously?

For a rather technical book in philosophy of quantum mechanics and QFT you can read Laura Ruetsche "interpreting quantum theories". You will also find numerous articles there (I link to subject ...
Quentin Ruyant's user avatar
5 votes

Plato meets Quantum Mechanics

The book "Große Physiker" by Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker deals with this question in the chapter "Platon" pp. 48-72 (which discusses the Timaios dialog), but already the preceding chapter "...
Thomas Klimpel's user avatar
5 votes

What is unique about the quantum state of superposition?

The "classical" form of quantum mechanics (no hidden variables or "pilot waves") maintains that a state exists as a superposition of all possibilities until the act of measuring ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
5 votes

What is unique about the quantum state of superposition?

The key characteristic of a quantum superposition is that all superposed states are equally real (or potentially real) at the physical level. This is quite different from a classical probability, ...
Guy Inchbald's user avatar
  • 2,582
5 votes

Can the universe be fully deterministic on a macro scale but not on a micro scale?

There is a strong "wish it were so" inclination in us humans for the universe to be simple and understandable. This is the motivation for wanting the universe to be predictable and ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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5 votes

What are the arguments for or against the wavefunction being a subjective vs an objective entity?

The 2022 Nobel physics award was given for the continuing work showing local hidden variable theories are ruled out. There is a small contingent of physicists and philosophers who still say the wave ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

How can we take the ontologies of our best physical theories seriously?

On philosophy of renormalization specifically the canonical reference is Cao-Schweber's Conceptual Foundations and the Philosophical Aspects of Renormalization Theory, see also Butterfield's Reduction,...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.4k
4 votes

Is the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics philosophically untenable?

The numbered objections given on your question don't take account of the actual literature on quantum mechanics without collapse. In the MWI systems exist in different versions that can interact ...
alanf's user avatar
  • 8,044
4 votes

Computer vs brain in many-worlds interpretation of QM

But classical computers rely on quantum processes too, which underlie the function of semiconductors. You can't just say 'wooo quantum things are weird the brain is weird, therefore they are the same,...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 22.5k
4 votes

Can space be both Euclidean and non-Euclidean, "at the same time"?

As a great statistician once said: “All models are wrong, but some are useful.” Euclidean Geometry is a way of approximating reality. It is useful under some circumstances and unhelpful in others. Any ...
philosodad's user avatar
  • 3,319
4 votes

How come when theories of concepts are made, there is never an agnostic point of accepting that there may be things we will never know?

I think what you mean is that there is a difference between how we perceive reality and how it actually is. The most important and unbreachable dividing line is in your head. There are also dividing ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 24.5k
4 votes

In 'quantum immortality', what is "survival" meant to entail?

"Quantum Immortality" is a controversial extension of the already controversial "many worlds" interpretation of quantum mechanics. The problem being addressed is that the world ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
4 votes

What are the ontological implications of that “the universe is not locally real” in quantum mechanics?

From WP on anti-realism: Anti-realism in its most general sense can be understood as being in contrast to a generic realism, which holds that distinctive objects of a subject-matter exist and have ...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k
4 votes

What are the arguments for or against the wavefunction being a subjective vs an objective entity?

I’m sceptical that one of the two alternatives hits the point how to interpret the wavefunction from quantum mechanics (QM). First I would like to ask you: What do you mean by this overloaded ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 34.6k
3 votes

Many-worlds Interpretation defeats the Doomsday argument?

This does not follow at all. If you buy the "Doomsday Theory", which argues that statistically speaking, there are likely to roughly be as many people born in the future as have already lived, then ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
3 votes
Accepted

Is quantum indeterminacy inextricable from observation?

Quantum indeterminacy is inextricable from observation because that which we consider to be "quantum indeterminacy" is related to the interpretations of QM rather than the mathematical model behind QM....
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 18.2k
3 votes

Plato meets Quantum Mechanics

Plato situated the real as an essentially mental experience. There are no perfect physical circles, only mental ones. So I think he would have no problem with QM, relating reality to the ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 22.5k
3 votes

Does quantum mechanics imply some kind of panpsychism?

Wikipedia describes quantum immortality or suicide as the following: In quantum mechanics, quantum suicide is a thought experiment, originally published independently by Hans Moravec in 1987 and ...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
  • 19.5k
3 votes
Accepted

Are the Bohmian and Copenhagen interpretations of QM isomorphic?

In Bohm's book Wholeness and the Implicate Order (which you can download for free here http://www.gci.org.uk/Documents/DavidBohm-WholenessAndTheImplicateOrder.pdf ) in chapter 8 "Steps Toward a More ...
21stCenturyParadox's user avatar
3 votes

Can many worlds interpretation have universes with different laws?

Couldn't MWI predict universes with different fundamental laws of physics (as a level-4 multiverse hypothesis would do, like string theory)? No. To understand why, you need to really grok what MWI ...
H Walters's user avatar
  • 440
3 votes

What is the case for free will?

As some of your commentators have pointed out, neither the problem nor responses to the problem are obscure. This is a central question in philosophy. See both posts with the free-will tag or the WP ...
J D's user avatar
  • 29.1k

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