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One rationalistic interpretation of these kinds of questions (or statements) is that they represent category errors -- that the phrasing of the question (or statement) contains an internal inconsistency. This view most closely aligns with the idea that there is no answer. This brings to mind the Zen koan: A monk asked the priest Jōshū, “Does a dog have ...


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Some phenomenons suggest an arrow of time that are not (or loosely) related to thermodynamics and the 2nd law. Take one of the most basic way humanity measured time, the cycle of the sun in the sky. What makes the sun go from east to west in a regular motion whose period we call a day? It's the momentum of Earth's rotation, which is always conserved ...


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Actually, thermodynamics all by itself does not provide an arrow of time, although it is often erroneously believed to do so. Let's do a thought experiment: At time t = 0, place an ice cube (with random initial conditions) on a table in a room that is kept at room temperature. Now let the laws of physics run normally in positive time. The ice cube will ...


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Yes, everything does have an infinitesimal amount of uncertainty. See this post for some discussion on it. As you say, there is always the possibility for events to randomly play out in an unexpected way. Even if, for a particular event, the laws of physics demand the event must play out in a certain way - we can never be certain of the laws of physics, ...


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No, the number of grey cups that I perceive on my desk at this time is exactly 1.


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There are still some QM "ideas" and interpretations that do not necessarily guarantee a statistician wouldn't be able to provide an exact prediction in principle as far as the quantum mechanical portion of an experiment is concerned. I have in mind superdeterminism and interpretations that treat the wavefunction as epistemic with an underlying ...


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Let me see if I understand your point. You observe that, in many-worlds, there is a branch for every outcome, and no branch has the honor of being the "canonical" one. Let us consider a fictional animal called a "grobling" that is about to be conceived. Let us say that an extra arm would be very beneficial to a grobling, if it had one. ...


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There is a kind of selection process, similar to natural selection in a way, where some macroscopic outcomes are more likely than others to "survive" (occur). These branches are more common than their counterparts. An example would be firing a gun at a person. There might be 999/1000 branches where the person dies and 1 where they live because the ...


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