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Heisenberg, Copenhagen and probability in QM

quantum states deal with probability functions and are subjective why do you say this probability functions are subjective? The Copenhagen interpretation considers that these functions would collect, ...
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What would the wavefunction represent in an observer-less universe?

The wavefunction represents what is happening in reality. It is not a statistical summary since the square amplitudes only act according to the calculus of probabilities in some circumstances: https://...
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What would the wavefunction represent in an observer-less universe?

The wavefunction represents what a measurement, were it to take place, would find as the statistics. Since we talk about it and compute it normally in a context before the measurement, it should make ...
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What is the most probable AI?

Humans will try to create artificial intelligence. Whether that is wise is an open question, but they will. The problem is that we can create quite powerful computers and powerful software, but the ...
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Does Zeno's paradox prove the continuity of spacetime?

No. Zeno's paradox assumes that motion is fundamentally continuous. If spacetime is fundamentally discrete, then motion is fundamentally discrete. An argument never proves its own premises. In every ...
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Was Einstein’s dice analogy not exactly how he wanted quantum mechanics to be?

Einstein's determinism manifested itself as a strict adherence to the physical concept of cause and effect. A concept that quantum mechanics challenges with probabilistic outcomes and quantum ...
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Was Einstein’s dice analogy not exactly how he wanted quantum mechanics to be?

No. Einstein objected to the fundamentally non-local nature of quantum mechanics (formerly called 'action at a distance'), when he declared "I am convinced God does not play dice". He ...
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If we believe the Free Will Theorem and experiments in QM, can we conclude that perfect randomness and free will are indistinguishable?

Randomness (or whatever it is that we are talking about by using the word "random") is not necessarily "perfectly unpredictable," or at least we need to spell out that phrase "...
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If we believe the Free Will Theorem and experiments in QM, can we conclude that perfect randomness and free will are indistinguishable?

To riff Pertti Ruismäki's answer from a materialist perspective: free will and randomness contradict each other. As armand writes in a comment: perfect randomness accounts for the "free" in ...
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