Hot answers tagged

7

"A man might say, with enough truth to justify a joke: 'Science is what we know, and philosophy is what we don’t know.'" -Bertrand Russell “Philosophy for Laymen” Universities Quarterly 1 (Nov 1946), 38-49 Unpopular Essays, Chapter 2 (George Allen & Unwin, 1951) No, philosophy is not taxonomy. Philosophy is respect for obtaining knowledge - whether ...


6

I have seen this quote in multiple books by the Turkish poet, Ahmet Necip Fazıl Kısakürek, who actually was a student of Henri Bergson. However, I am not aware if this quote appears in one of Bergson's works. The book, Mümin - Kâfir (The Believer and Disbeliever) has following dialogue: Believer - As a matter of fact, a Western philosopher who has ...


6

See Twilight of the Idols, or How One Philosophizes with a Hammer (Götzen-Dämmerung, oder Wie man mit dem Hammer philosophiert, August-September 1888) : The Probelm of Socrates : "The wisest men in every age have reached the same conclusion about life: it's no good ... What does this prove? What does it demonstrate? [...] these wisest men of all ages, let ...


5

Nietzsche is talking about decadence, i.e., any approach to life, such as Christian morality, that leads to the decay rather than the flourishing of human beings. At the same time, he is commenting on the fact that over two millennia, so few people have recognized this: doing so requires genius. Consider this excerpt from Ecce Homo, Why I Am a Destiny: "I ...


5

I don't know all of Kant's work but I know mainly his point was that using your reason is what gives you freedom, makes you human and is what gives hope to humanity. He never talks about knowledge, he talks about using your own intelligence. In other words, questioning things. He says weak people go for the easy answer, all made for them, all prepared. The ...


5

See Democritus of Abdera (born about 460 BCE) and the complete English transaltion of Democritus' fragments. In a nutshell, we may read it as [see Fr.113] : love for wisdom is more important than power. Democritus was an Atomist and one of central concerns of Presocratic Philosophy was the inquiry regarding nature. See e.g. Aristotle about Thales : ...


5

It is hard to find because it does not exist. This quote, along with "When I let go of what I have, I receive what I need", are made up by John Heider in his 1985 Tao of Leadership. Here is from Taoistic: "This fake Lao Tzu quote is weird not only in the eyes of Lao Tzu, but in those of just about every ancient thinker. They would all agree that I have to ...


4

The key word in the first sentence is "fights." When one fight, one often justifies one's actions by what it does to one's opponents. People who consider killing to be wrong are often willing to take a life in self defense. In practice, it is often very hard to stop undertaking these actions when the monster is gone. Consider the case of the warrior who ...


3

In this part of Book II, Plato is describing the early education of the Guardians. In Waterfield's translation, this passage appears in Chapter 4, "Primary Education for the Guardians". Plato, Republic (Oxford University Press 1994) Shall we, then, casually allow our children to listen to any old stories, made up by just anyone, and to take into their ...


3

Plato would prefer to censor the story completely and eliminate it from circulation because it projects a morally incorrect image of the gods. However, he recognises that the story, so firmly entrenched in traditional religion, may need to be retained. The sacrifice of a pig was standard at proceedings of the Eleusinian mysteries, which are not named ...


3

Though I'm pretty sure the quote is not from Aristotle, much of it is covered by what Aristotle says in Nicomachean Ethics. A person with the excellence of practical rationality is characteristically able to plan well about what is good or useful for living well or being happy (VI, 5, 1140a25-28). It is his function to plan well concerning goods ...


3

I think that the source is one of Wittgenstein's letters to Ludwig von Ficker (prospective publisher of the Tractatus): maybe that of December 4 or October 1919. Unfortunately, I'm unable to check on the original edition, nor the English translation: Briefe an Ludwig von Ficker, Salzburg, 1969; English translation “Letters to Ludwig von Ficker,” in C.G....


3

A. J. Ayer, a very famous twentieth century analytic philosopher, with the help of Jane O'Grady published a book entitled A Dictionary Of Philosophical Quotations which should provide you with exactly what you are looking for. In addition, John Bartlett's book Bartlett's Familiar Quotations is one of the most famous collection of quotations in existence. ...


3

It is about friendship (Ancient Greek: φιλία): Anaxagoras of Clazomenae was friend and counsellor of the Athenian stateman Pericles. See V.Azoulay, Pericles of Athens, (French ed., 2010), page 90: Peicles' public commitments were so absorbing that he could not always spare the time to devote to his friends, even the closest of them. According to an ...


3

Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None (German: Also sprach Zarathustra: Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen) (1883-91), First part : "Alone I go now, my disciples! You too must go away, now, and alone. Thus I will it. [...] Go away from me and guard yourselves against Zarathustra! And better still: be ashamed of him! Perhaps ...


3

If you view Aristotle's "Metaphysics" at http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/metaphysics.mb.txt and search for the word "know" (including words with "know" n them), you will see that he strongly suggests it several times, though not as a direct quote, at least not in this translation. Perhaps the most relevant paragraph: "Some of the sensible substances are ...


3

Descartes' Meditations, III, 14. In a nutshell, form where we humans can "receive" the idea of a God [sovereign], eternal, infinite, [immutable], all-knowing, all-powerful, and the creator of all things that are out of himself [?] This idea [the effect] must be produced by something [its cause] that has at least as much "reality" as the idea itself. ...


2

I found cites, though nothing specific, to Socrates, Lao-Tse, George Bernard Shaw, and Aristotle. I did some word searches in the works reprinted at Project Gutenberg. But nothing helpful. My best guess: the original quote has become so corrupted over time that searches for a source will produce everyone and no one.


2

I think it quite likely that he's saying exactly that. Russell, pretty much from 1905 on and more so in later life, considered that knowledge derived from only two sources; facts about objects (derived from the scientific method) and certain facts about ourselves (really a special class of object, which, by direct acquaintance we already know and have no ...


2

This sounds like a loose paraphrase of the sense of Daybreak aph. 329 (see also the first half of aph. 542, and the parallel passage in Genealogy of Morals). The necessity of illusions is also the major theme of "Truth and Lie". I agree with the earlier comment that, if it has any relation to a particular passage at all, it is a bad paraphrase! It's hard to ...


2

Ah! I found it! It was in his book The Philosophy of Logical Atomism (see the chapter entitled Logical Atomism (1924), which starts on page 126): The only way in which work on mathematical logic throws light on the truth or falsehood of mathematics is by disproving the supposed antinomies. This shows that mathematics may be true. But to show that ...


2

Yes, the quote is indeed from the Phenomenology of Perception. It can be found on page 482 of the Landes translation published by Routledge in 2012. The same passage, in different translation, can be found on page 529 of the older Colin Smith translation: I am a psychological and historical structure, and have received, with existence, a manner of ...


2

As curiousdannii suggests try replaying "save" with "except". Here is the original passage from Chapter 7, "On Work": And I say that life is indeed darkness save when there is urge. And all urge is blind save when there is knowledge. And all knowledge is vain save when there is work. And all work is empty save when there is love. To help ...


2

With further searching I found the answer in Hugh S. Moorhead's The Meaning of Life, page 164-165. The quote comes from a letter to Hugh Moorhead from Bertrand Russell on January 10, 1952. Moorhead had sent various authors, including Russell, a copy of one of their books asking them to autograph the book with an answer to the question: What is the meaning ...


2

It appears to originate in this lecture: https://www.alanwatts.org/searchable/1-4-4-divine-madness/ The audio of which can be purchased here: https://alan-watts-electronic-university.myshopify.com/products/philosophy-and-society See here for more information about that website. maybe you can contact them to ask about licensing: https://www.alanwatts.org/...


2

The quote is not Camus'. But, apparently, misquoting Camus, or even fabricating quotes is something of an enterprise. Gaetani even has papaer on it The noble art of misquoting Camus. They include "I would rather live my life as if there is a God, and die to find out there isn't, than live my life as if there isn't, and die to find out there is", "Don't walk ...


1

Maybe from The World as Will and Representation (1818/19), Vol II, Ch.XXVIII "Characterization of the Will to Live", page 353 : we are driven to the view that life is a business whose returns are far from covering the cost.


1

"He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster" Think of Quint in Jaws. His experience on the USS Indianapolis so affected him that the rest of his life became a quest to kill sharks. He became the monster he was seeking. He was obsessed like Captain Ahab. There is also a good scene in "Manhunter" where Will Graham vists ...


1

I could not find your quote. However, I found one which suggests that Russell might have believed the opposite. Mathematics is, I believe, the chief source of the belief in eternal and exact truth, as well as a sensible intelligible world. http://www.azquotes.com/quote/739801, citing Bertrand Russell (2013), “History of Western Philosophy: Collectors ...


1

▻ THE QUOTATION Let's get the quotation in front of us. Tt's from 'On the Friend', Thus Spake Zarathustra : "One is always too many around me" - thus thinks the hermit. "Always one times one - in the long run that makes two!" ['Einer ist immer zu viel um mich' – also denkt der Einsiedler. »Immer Einmal Eins – das giebt auf die Dauer Zwei!] I and me ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible