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26 votes
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Is immorality just irrationality?

What you are describing is the Platonic view of good and evil, that no one does wrong willingly, but only out of ignorance. An unusually clear and explicit statement of this concept is found in Plato'...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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17 votes
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Do people who "withhold judgement" also have a burden of proof?

Describing yourself ("I am not convinced.") is free. Describing the rest of reality ("Your argument is not convincing.") costs an argument.
g s's user avatar
  • 6,295
15 votes
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Is it ever rational to stumble onto the conjunction fallacy in probability?

Well, the conjunction fallacy is a fallacy, so it's not rational to believe it. However... Suppose Dave tells you he was just robbed and that's why he's were late to meet with you. You are skeptical, ...
causative's user avatar
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14 votes

Does philosophy rely on intuitions? If so, does this mean all of philosophy is nothing more than hunches?

Does philosophy rely on intuition? Yes. Does that mean it is nothing more than hunches? No. To conclude so would be the rather elementary fallacy of composition: The fallacy of composition is an ...
J D's user avatar
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14 votes
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Is desire closed under logical equivalence?

No. Firstly, a person may not know that S and S' are logically equivalent, in which case the desires may fail to agree quite straightforwardly. If you amended the question to: is desire closed under ...
Bumble's user avatar
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12 votes

Do people who "withhold judgement" also have a burden of proof?

First of all, "the burden of proof" is not a hard and fast rule but more about sportsmanship. So as asserting a claim is easier than defending or disproving one the former usually is ...
haxor789's user avatar
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10 votes

Is desire closed under logical equivalence?

In the strictest sense: no. There's three questions here, with varying degrees of justification required: Can I desire S without desiring S'? Can I desire S and desire not-S'? Can I desire S and ...
The Thought Detective's user avatar
9 votes
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Does suspending judgment require judgment?

Feldman basically says that im situations of high epistemic uncertainty, it is often better to stay agnostic. In order to do so, we need to judge that the matter at hand features so much epistemic ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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8 votes

Does philosophy shed any light on how parties can fruitfully debate without an agreed source of truth?

From a purely epistemological point of view, no, philosophy is not really helpful. If anything, philosophy makes things worse. See this post and this post and the responses to it. From a social point ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
8 votes
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Can it be rational to have beliefs one knows to be inconsistent?

It can. Ramsey put it nicely in his "last papers" written around 1929 under the influence of Peirce's pragmatism (quoted from Marion, Wittgenstein, Ramsey and British Pragmatism): "We want our ...
Conifold's user avatar
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8 votes
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Can animals follow logical rules of inference?

The thought experiment is known as Chrysippus’s Dog and goes back to the named ancient Stoic. It was discussed by many modern philosophers, including Dennett, see Chrysippus’s Dog as a Case Study in ...
Conifold's user avatar
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7 votes
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Are there any aspects of science which do not change over time?

Like many other professional philosophers of science these days, I'm highly influenced by the contemporary disunity of science movement. So I would say that there aren't any general aspects of ...
Dan Hicks's user avatar
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6 votes

Is immorality just irrationality?

Doesn't this then give the idea of a 'bad' person a different implication - we wouldn't say the same to someone if they made a mistake in math or in their finances yet people who are simply in ...
Marc H.'s user avatar
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6 votes

Is desire closed under logical equivalence?

So, how strict are we about defining "logical equivalence" here? Whether the answer is "yes" or "no" depends entirely on that. If what we mean is just "S' holds in ...
Stephen Voris's user avatar
6 votes

Is desire closed under logical equivalence?

Let A a 10-page long logical formula (or the corresponding sentence in English if you prefer) which is logically true but verifying it is beyond your or anyone else's capabilities. You, presumably, ...
Adam Přenosil's user avatar
6 votes

Do people who "withhold judgement" also have a burden of proof?

I apologise in advance for the possibly confusing answer. Withholding judgement means making a non-claim or no proposition about the issue, correct? In that case there is nothing C says that requires ...
notwithstanding's user avatar
6 votes

Do people who "withhold judgement" also have a burden of proof?

The short answer is no, but the question makes a few faulty presumptions: It presumes that holding an opinion requires the holder of the opinion to provide any sort of justification for their belief, ...
Michael Hall's user avatar
6 votes

How many dimensions does time have?

The time variable in spacetime can be rolled into the algebra like a spatial quantity but gets marked with a sign (+/-) opposite that of the spatial variables so the math will work out. This is ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
6 votes

Does suspending judgment require judgment?

You are right that a decision to suspend judgement is a judgement. However, the point you are missing is that it is a different judgement. You seem to think the phrase 'suspend judgement' means 'make ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 23.6k
5 votes

Is immorality just irrationality?

In English we often use the terms good and bad relative to an ideal. (In Spanish it is the same). So we call a person a good person when some portion (Surly a majority but what percent I don't ...
Dan Anderson's user avatar
5 votes

Does philosophy shed any light on how parties can fruitfully debate without an agreed source of truth?

Here are the questions regarding the extreme partisanship of politics today: Is there any philosophical thinking which might help resolve these disputes and allow the political discussion to move ...
Frank Hubeny's user avatar
  • 19.5k
5 votes

Does determinism prevent rationality?

John Lennox's idea is that we would have no reason to believe our own logical conclusions if nature, and therefore the brain itself, was deterministic. He says (40:15 - 40:48) that there would be no ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Which philosophers have considered irrational conviction

Most recently, the community of scholars who addresses irrationality with force and recognition is the behavioral economists, and one of the most famous scholars associated with it is Daniel Kahneman. ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.3k
5 votes

Can the sexual double standard be justified according to this logic/reasoning?

The reasoning is a non sequitur: virginity is only losely correlated to fertility, and somewhat negatively. Your reasoning for considering virginity desirable is that a woman who never had sex is not ...
armand's user avatar
  • 6,780
4 votes

Is immorality just irrationality?

Morality doesn't have anything to do with rationality. I'm going to be Nietzsche's advocate and say that "good" and "bad" are just labels on what a given society wants. This is by no means absolute ...
jmmut's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes

Is immorality just irrationality?

I've given this a lot of thought as a Christian who has studied the Bible a lot and generally agrees with your reasoning here, having found overlap between the two that seems accurate to me. Here is ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 143
4 votes

Why does Newcomb's paradox seem to have different solutions depending on when the choice is made despite determinism?

Newcomb's paradox was discussed at length by philosophers, with the issues of determinism, free will, time travel, etc., brought in. What it turned out to be, however, is an analog of Bertrand paradox ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
4 votes

Two Solutions to the Problem of Death

I think one has to analyse a person's exact state of mind who fears their eventual demise. Rationality I take in the sense of instrumental rationality - taking efficient means to clearly conceived ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
4 votes

Why should we treat others as *always* rational when they are not?

Kantian autonomy is determined by the faculty of reason, not by rational acts In a strictly Kantian setting, the person is autonomous. Full stop. That is because there are two aspects in the will ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
  • 14.3k
4 votes

Does determinism prevent rationality?

"If hard determinism is true, and our thoughts are merely the results of a causal chain of atomic interactions, are reason and logic illusory?" Lennox is not speaking about "hard ...
Steven Harder's user avatar

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