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32 votes

Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out the good things?

The specific fallacy is cherry picking evidence to support a conclusion. This is one of the most common fallacies committed by people with actual intention to be rational and is based on the invalid ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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19 votes

Can God's existence be established through reason and publicly accessible evidence?

My knowledge of the subject is insufficiently compendious to allow me to give an authoritative answer to your question, but I assume the answer is no, since were it possible to prove the existence of ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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18 votes

What type of fallacy is it when people in undeveloped countries claim something it's true, because developed countries do it?

The fallacy on this specific case is Argumentum Ad Populum (because others do it). For example, several countries, like Bolivia, decreed anachronistic lockdown endings during the Covid-19 pandemic, ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,661
13 votes

What type of fallacy is it when people in undeveloped countries claim something it's true, because developed countries do it?

Strictly speaking, a fallacy is a specious argument, so unless you have at a BARE minimum, one stated premise, one unstated premise, and a conclusion, you don't have enough to call something a fallacy....
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
12 votes

Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out the good things?

Short Answer What you seem to be interested in is not so much a fallacy, but is called paltering. Long Answer Is there a name for this fallacy when someone says something is good by only pointing out ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
10 votes
Accepted

Is there a deduction analog to the problem of induction?

When it comes to justification there is indeed a symmetric problem of deduction. But forming general opinions or laws is not part of deduction, it is abductive (or in older terminology inductive), ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
10 votes

Fallacy of the Devil You Know

There is no way a comedian known for playing the piano with his male organ became president of Ukraine without some hidden influence; therefore, the CIA installed him in the presidency. I believe ...
Idiosyncratic Soul's user avatar
10 votes

Can God's existence be established through reason and publicly accessible evidence?

You would need observations that can be explained by the existence of god, and that have no reasonable explanation if god does not exist. I don’t know of any such observations. And then there is the ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 5,647
8 votes

What fallacy is this? “This happened, therefore there must be good reasons for it”

What fallacy is it when someone says "this is true/it happened, therefore there are good reasons for it"? There is no fallacy described here. The argument uses the Principle of Sufficient Reason. ...
Mark Andrews's user avatar
  • 6,344
8 votes

Epistemic circularity and skepticism about reason

Your entire post starts with a suspect claim. Reason's own standards of justification require that any claim meet objective criteria independent of the believing subject. Says who? Is this a quote ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
8 votes
Accepted

Is non-physicalism reasonable?

First Question, is belief in a non-physicalist worldview reasonable The key issue to consider to answer your first question is to realize how science is done. In a field of empirical inquiry the ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
8 votes

Does the PSR violate Occam’s razor?

No. To consider them at odds would be the product of committing a category mistake. The Principle for Sufficient Reason is an observation about how causality and explanation are universally applicable ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
7 votes
Accepted

Can disputes over what is reasonable or unreasonable to believe be resolved objectively?

It depends on what you mean by 'objectively'. If objectivity is taken to be the consensus of subjective agents, for instance, by subscribing to a convention, then there is, let's call it, a first-...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
6 votes

Reason is the adversary of thinking

Heidegger's idea here is actually not difficult to make out, unlikely as that might appear, if we trace the quotation to its source and check the context. Gavin Rae, 'Overcoming Philosophy: Heidegger,...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
6 votes

What fallacy is this? “This happened, therefore there must be good reasons for it”

"Everything happens for a reason" is usually used in a different context, as a way to cope with senseless tragedies caused by random disasters. It is a case of pathetic fallacy, ascribing human ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
6 votes
Accepted

Is the use of feminist stories sufficient evidence to claim misogyny keeps women out of STEM fields?

Short Answer It depends on your metaphysical presuppositons. What you are asking is a question regarding the normativity of explanation. So, depending on whether you're inclined towards critical ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
6 votes

scientific inquiry of theory of evolution

You are conflating the deductive certainty of mathematical methods, and perhaps certain conclusions one can draw from the material conditional, say of the transitivity of volumes in space as a general ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
6 votes

Epistemic circularity and skepticism about reason

It is rather too strong to require that any claim meets objective criteria. But you are correct to say that if we ask what rational grounds there are for being rational, it is difficult to supply a ...
Bumble's user avatar
  • 26.4k
6 votes

Is non-physicalism reasonable?

Physicalism as described in the linked article is so underdefined that it doesn't make any claims at all to be true or false. At best it's a commitment to investigate everything with the scientific ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,325
5 votes

Is there a deduction analog to the problem of induction?

I typically present 'The Problem of Deduction' as a the following analogy to the better known 'Problem of Induction': One of the workhorses of deduction surely is Modus Ponens ... but why do we trust ...
Bram28's user avatar
  • 2,719
5 votes

Does determinism prevent rationality?

John Lennox's idea is that we would have no reason to believe our own logical conclusions if nature, and therefore the brain itself, was deterministic. He says (40:15 - 40:48) that there would be no ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 8,173
5 votes

What precisely are brute contingent facts?

According to Wikipedia, Poincare distinguished brute facts from their scientific description. The first is ontological and the second, epistemic. Now, scientific descriptions can be founded on other ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
5 votes

What type of fallacy is it when people in undeveloped countries claim something it's true, because developed countries do it?

Argumentum ad Crumenam Literally, appeal to wealth. You seem to be describing an argument where someone’s wealth is held to be proof of their good taste and judgment, or it is assumed that imitating ...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 862
5 votes

Is circular reasoning always wrong?

This is not a circular argument, it's an if and only if statement. There's nothing formally wrong with circular arguments. A therefore A is always true. They just don't prove anything, since they're ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,325
5 votes

Is it possible to know what you don't know?

Let's model this conundrum with sets. Let's assume to start with that you are aware of the contents of one set, call it set C. But your universe also contains sets A, B, D, E, F, ... If you do not ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Fallacy of the Devil You Know

This is an interesting question. Conspiratorial thinking whether it is government organizations or pervasive forms of evil is something I've bumped into repeatedly. Clearly, one gets a sense some form ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.5k
5 votes

Do some philosophical questions tend to entertain vacuous ideas?

Not all questions here are equally "sensible" as you put it, but one cannot rule out a priori that an issue that superficially seems "empty, inane, devoid of value" is necessarily ...
Mikhail Katz's user avatar
  • 1,461
4 votes

Is there a name for the idea of inherent bias in an authority figure or expert?

You appear to be referring to self-selection bias. This is a well-known phenomenon in statistics, whereby self-selection into a category is correlated with other characteristics, and hence, inclusion ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 1,946

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