5 votes

Are we lost in the details?

Fragmentation is another word for specialisation, and specialisation is a feature of the two main areas of activity in which the most effort is invested in developing new ideas, namely business and ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Under metaphysical naturalism, does everything boil down to Physics?

Yes* According to metaphysical naturalism, all matter and their interactions are ultimately a result of the interactions of their material parts (down to atomic particles and such). Even for most who ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
  • 7,049
3 votes

Under reductive materialism, could the same brain state evoke distinct conscious experiences (qualia) in two universes within a multiverse?

It's not a bad question, but it isn't currently answerable, because it relies too much on concepts that are purely speculative. Yes, IF reductive materialism is true, then there must be some ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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3 votes

Under metaphysical naturalism, does everything boil down to Physics?

Under metaphysical naturalism, does everything boil down to Physics? TLDR Depending on one's definition 'boil down', not yes, not no, but partially so! Explanation You have one answer that says other ...
J D's user avatar
  • 24.9k
3 votes

Are we lost in the details?

What do you imagine a "big picture" to look like? We can start by asserting that every part of those ancient "respective characteristics, properties and personalities" was entirely ...
Graham's user avatar
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3 votes

Are we lost in the details?

Your questions are quite broad, but I'll answer to the general spirit of the inquiry. Are we lost in the details?... Is this fragmentation of meaning now an obstacle into going forward? Are we in ...
J D's user avatar
  • 24.9k
3 votes

Under metaphysical naturalism, does everything boil down to Physics?

No, because of emergence. Saying other sciences are reducible to physics, is like saying literature is reducible to the alphabet. What did emerge, Earth biology, didn't have to be that way, & the ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

On thermodynamics being fundamental?

The relationship between thermodynamics and classical mechanics is that thermodynamics describes the statistical properties of particles using classical mechanics and is often seen as interrelated ...
J D's user avatar
  • 24.9k
2 votes

Are the concepts of reductionism and first principles the same?

First principles means that we take whatever knowledge there is and try to find routes from that to the principle, in an unbroken chain of logical connection. There is no a priori preference. ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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2 votes

Are we lost in the details?

Fragmentation of totality is necessary to understand that there is only cause and effect. How do you approach the fragmentation and how honest are you with your findings is of utmost importance? You ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between supervenience and reduction?

Supervenience and reduction are terms of art in philosophy that denote two dependence relations. We use the notion of supervenience often to describe a relationship between two sets of properties or ...
Tankut Beygu's user avatar
  • 2,095
1 vote

Under reductive materialism, could the same brain state evoke distinct conscious experiences (qualia) in two universes within a multiverse?

Short answer No. You are mistaken about what reductive materialism is. If you postulate reductive materialism, then mind is just an aspect of matter. There is an identity between some aspect of ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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1 vote

Reductionism from a philosophical viewpoint

Reductionism is the idea that knowledge at a higher level can be deduced from the entities and their interaction at a lower level there are multiple meanings to reductionism, and this is one of the ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 892
1 vote

Are we lost in the details?

I think it's easy to claim someone is missing the big picture. I think it might be you. Note: speaking only for biology here. We see this complaint a lot, in science - people look at the title of a ...
lupe's user avatar
  • 369
1 vote

Are we lost in the details?

Is this fragmentation of meaning now an obstacle into going forward? Are we in need of a "big picture"? Do we have to make a reconciliation of some kind? It doesn't appear to be an obstacle. ...
EmptyShaman's user avatar
1 vote

Are we lost in the details?

"Going forward" as used in your final question can be understood in different ways: Going forward in understanding the phenomena observed in the biosphere. That’s a question of epistemology,...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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1 vote

Physics and the question of context or environment

No, your argument is based on a misunderstanding. Physics does not overlook context. The laws of physics describe the fundamental ways in which matter interacts in spacetime. The real world context is ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 17.8k
1 vote

Physics and the question of context or environment

You say "Newton's laws of motion apply to ideal objects with measurable attributes devoid of interference from extraneous sources (e.g. 'bodies falling in a vaccuum'.) This also explains why the ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.1k
1 vote

Physics and the question of context or environment

Physics is different from biology because it is easier in physics to isolate systems from their environment, so as to simplify their analysis. This is why the basic equations are context-independent. ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
1 vote

Topdown bottom up reductionism emergentism

Your question has 2 parts: The first refers to Ontology (reductionism-holism) and the second refers to a part of Epistemology, the Methodic (analytical, or top-down approach and synthetic or bottom-up ...
Carabela1492's user avatar
1 vote

Are the concepts of reductionism and first principles the same?

It's less about what's vaguely different between those two, and more about what's commensurable or incommensurable for them. What epistemic graph theory suggests, for example (in its "semantics,&...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote

On thermodynamics being fundamental?

What is the meaning of the term more fundamental in this context? The reason thermodynamics might be considered more fundamental is that it accounts for the observation that the actual system and its ...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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1 vote

Why did phenomenalism fall out of favour in analytic philosophy?

But why did the logical positivist project of doing an opposite kind of reduction i.e reducing physical terms into phenomenal terms go out of fashion? It sounds as if you are asking after the ...
J D's user avatar
  • 24.9k
1 vote

Is emergentism incompatible with reductionism?

Emergentism implies that there are some properties and regularities that are proper to the level in question, thus life is an emergent property and evolution by natural selection are proper to the ...
Carabela1492's user avatar

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