5

The origin is with the so-called Whiteley Sentence. See C.Whiteley, “Minds, Machines and Gödel: A Reply to Mr. Lucas (1962)”, Philosophy 37:61-62 : It is possible to devise a formula which will trap a human mind —say, Mr Lucas's— in the same way that his application of Gödel traps the machine. Take, for instance, the formula 'This formula ...


4

Calvin, as Mauro said: .... in Calvin’s vastly influential 1559 Institutes of the Christian Religion, he wrote, “There is within the human mind, and indeed by natural instinct, an awareness of divinity.” This awareness of divinity, or sensus divinitatis, is “beyond dispute” according to Calvin. (Greg Cootsona, 'Science and the Sensus Divinitatis ...


2

You’re assuming that simulation is a philosophically coherent category. It’s not. Few philosophers have taken up Bostroms notion of a simulation as a philosophically coherent thought. It’s science-fiction dressed up as philosophy, and for we know, that’s where Bostrom got the idea from.


2

I’m gonna talk about my own experience. I think nihilism can lead to suicide. But I think we can make a better link between nihilism and depression. Not having any reasons to live for or anything you believe in can make you sad. In can probably lead you to depression. As long as you keep doing something and keep yourself entertained, nothing can go wrong. ...


1

Wasn't French at all. Sensus divinitatis, it turned out to be. Came from a French guy though.


1

The Key Socratic documents Plato wrote many plays. In most eg Republic, Plato uses Socrates as his mouthpiece. Arguably the two plays that are most authentically Socratic are the Apology and Phaedo – ie trial/sentencing and the subsequent death – more correctly murder – of Socrates. A key part of the Apology is... Socrates' encounter with the Oracle of ...


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