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A really interesting question that for now does not seem to have a good answer. Basically it's supposed to be picture from 1978 seminar by Althusser. It's in the Imec archive and has been used for the cover of the book. But there is an apparently well supported suggestion that it may have been staged (Bachir). On the picture Althusser appears to be pointing ...


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'I am curious about lines of thinking which look at epistemology through ontological lenses specifically.' Proposition 5 from Spinoza's "Ethics" Part 2, (below) needs a bit of transliterating, but does predate by over 300 years your assumption that your 'list' includes every ponderable concerning the origin and nature of epistemology in ontology. Spinoza's ...


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Have you seen the video Shapiro's Excluded Middle? I don't think it includes any actual footage of Ben Shapiro talking. However, it gives some specific examples, with quite a bit of detail.


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It seems to me this is more or less the issue of hard solipsism. I am not aware of a way out of this. If you take even a small portion of Hume as true, this explains why we cannot ever resolve this issue (see An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding for all the gory details - Hume set out the limits of our knowledge - he was the Heisenberg of Epistemology ...


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In this piece which talks about similar questions about the nature of reality and his own quasi-mystical experiences, he mentions a number of pre-socratic philosophers (Heraclitus, Parmenides, Xenophanes, Anaxagoras) along with Plato, Hume and Spinoza: The pre-Socratic Greek philosopher Parmenides taught that the only things that are real are things which ...


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you cannot really know because you [would] have to trust what that entity or your forgotten ego says which could be deceitful too. Seems to lead straight to Descartes: Latin: "Non posse à nobis dubitari, quin existamus dum dubitamus: atque hoc esse primum quod ordine philosophando cognoscimus." English: "That we cannot doubt of our existence ...


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One place to check for texts is the Internet Archive. If the text is available they offer multiple formats in which you can download it or you may read the text online. If you read it online flipping the pages changes the URL. You can be quickly access the page you are ready by copying the link or saving it in a bookmark. Information about the text is also ...


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There's The Logic of Reliable Inquiry by Kevin Kelly, which develops a formal learning theory framework to address philosophical problems about scientific inquiry.


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Karl Popper - The logic of scientific discovery - it is a classic book about methodology and Philosophy of science. The concept of falsiability is crucial to understand modern epistemological debates.


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Nonsense: A Handbook of Logical Fallacies - Robert Gula - this book is a good compilation of fallacies in simple but technically rigorous terms.


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Two books of Adam Smith: The Wealth of nations (1776) -- it gives the basis of liberalism and modern economic policies; The theory of moral sentiments (1759) - Smith shows moral virtues as rules for human beings.


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The first obvious alternative to Communism comes from the split in the first international between Marx and Mikhail Bakunin, the latter being so critical of Marx's 'authoritarian socialism' that he got expelled by Marx. Bakunin and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon were the first serious anarchist theorists. If you want particularly zany options, you may wish to ...


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The options I know have texts in searchable formats, but none is specific to major works or neatly organized like Gutenberg's Philosophy Bookshelf. You'll have to know the names and the authors you are looking for. PhilPapers: They try to list all books and publications in academic philosophy journals. Not all of it is freely accessible, sometimes they just ...


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Internet Archive has some texts that may be useful. As an example consider C. K. Ogden's translation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Copyright is listed as Public Domain Mark 1.0. There is an option to download this in multiple formats including pdf and full text. Other texts are available.


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P.D. Ouspensky's Tertium Organum has this extract from Kant’s CPR in the starting chapter. The entire book can be considered to be… Mathematico-mystical variations on the Kantian theme Nothing which is intuited in space is a thing in itself, and space is not a form which belongs as a property to things; but objects are quite ...


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Ontology made easy - Amie Thomasson: It is considered a great book and a friendly guide to ontology. An important issue treated in it is related to the quantifier approach of ontology.


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