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The short answer is "no". Your main question is whether (2) follows from (1); (1) P → Q [ P is a sufficient condition for Q ], (2) Q → P [ P is a necessary condition for Q ]. The reason the entailment from (1) to (2) doesn't hold is that it's possible that Q follow from some proposition R that is not equivalent to P. The only instance ...


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Discrimination and oppression are not the same thing. We all know people in oppressed minorities who actively hate members of the dominant class and treat them unfairly. But from the position expressed in the first paragraph of @ChrisSunami's answer, while this is discrimination (prejudice), it is not oppression (racism, classism, heterosexism, sexism, etc....


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This is a topic of current controversy among social theorists. One prominent stance can be traced to activist educators Pat Bidol and Judith Katz, to the effect that "racism is power plus prejudice." In other words, any one can have a prejudice, which is to say, a preconception about another person based on characteristics such as race and gender. But ...


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To be an elephant is sufficient but not necessary for being a mammal. To be a mammal is necessary but not sufficient for being an elephant.


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The roots are unrelated. (Btw questions of this type are easily resolved using a lexicon or Wiktionary.) If you enjoy conceptual investigations of etymological roots you might be interested in Heidegger's Introduction to Metaphysics.


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Just one quick example: Two numbers are coprime if they do not share any common factors (other than 1) and are not equal. From the definition, it is sufficient to show that two numbers are prime numbers to show that they are coprime, but it isn't necessary: 8 and 9 are coprime, but neither are prime. Thus, not all sufficient conditions are necessary.


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To qualify as a good driver, it is sufficient to be able to drive well and be female. However, it is not necessary, because also men can be good drivers. Consider the set W of all objects and the set X of all desired objects, giving U=W\X. A sufficient condition is a predicate s(w) such that s(w) is false for all elements in U. A necessary predicate is a ...


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(This is an extended comment, not a properly sourced answer) I have a feeling that you are looking for an explanation where it is shown that loving/treating two or more people equally results in some sort of contradiction or fallacy. That is not the case. Based on logic alone, there's no apriori reason that an agent can't assign the exact same value/ranking ...


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Aristotle resolves the argument in Physics bk. Δ On Place, ch. 3 (210b): Zeno's problem—that if Place is something it must be in something—is not difficult to solve. There is nothing to prevent the first place from being 'in' something else—not indeed in that as 'in' place, but as health is 'in' the hot as a positive determination of it or as the hot is '...


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There is not a single universal concept of Ownership. Consider the following definitions: Wikipedia Ownership is the state or fact of exclusive rights and control over property, which may be an object, land/real estate or intellectual property. Ownership involves multiple rights, collectively referred to as title, which may be separated and held by ...


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The Categories, chap.7 /On Relatives/ contains a remarkable discussion in just a few pages and its author, supposedly Aristotle, might well be the first to have 'studied' asymmetric relations. So Aristotle distinguishes contrariety and reciprocation, adding further consideration on simultaneity. All relatives are 'reciprocated', but no all of them have '...


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William Rowan Hamilton's discovery of quaternions in the 19th century may be the first studied non-commutative relations. Here is Wikipedia: In mathematics, the quaternions are a number system that extends the complex numbers. They were first described by Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton in 1843 and applied to mechanics in three-dimensional ...


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Punishing defectors There's the concept of 'punishing defectors' which has multiple valid basis - there's a game theory justification that a (credible) promise to punish defectors, even if it costs you, is (in certain cases) an effective strategy that makes things better for everyone. By extension, "not doing your part" and not punishing defectors is also ...


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From p. 1162 on "virtus" of A Lexicon of St. Thomas Aquinas by DeFerrari: omnis virtus una operatione vel uno actu fertur in obiectum et in rationalem formalem obiecti (C. G. 1. 76), every power [virtue] aims with one and the same action at its object and at the formal relationship according to which it is its object,* sicut eadem visione videmus lumen et ...


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Ethics of care I offer a definition to ensure that we all have the same thing in mind in talking of an 'ethics of care' (or to sort things out if we don't) : The key idea is that the detached, impartial observer ideal of morality, characteristic of ethics since the enlightenment, is flawed and inappropriate, particularly for women. In its place ...


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If you have no knowledge of how you perceive the cube, could you even know that you were presented with a three-dimensional object ? Wouldn't there just be a two-dimensional shape in your visual field ? The same with the sphere : it would appear merely as a circular shape, and still only a circular shape even if it were rotated. You could gain contrastive ...


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I think one thing that would help your line of questioning a bit is that you can restrict your question to this: can you love two people maximally and equally. It seems obvious and intuitive that I can love/value people equally. For instance, there's a category of people who I do not know. For such people, I value them as human beings and from this ascribe ...


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Per this answer, 'A is sufficient for B.`   means that    'A is a subset of B'. A picture and real-life example may aid to understand the following: Your main question is whether (2) follows from (1); (1) P → Q [ P is a sufficient condition for Q ], (2) Q → P [ P is a necessary condition for Q ]. The reason the entailment ...


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