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At least some skeptics/relativists have not realized that their view is self-refuting. If a person that does not possess strong critical thinking skills observes that people believe in different things around him/her, s/he can make a superficial deduction of "I see people believe in different things, so how can there be such a thing as truth?" It ...


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No. Moral relativism is the view that: (1) Moral sentences express propositions (moral sentences are either true or false), and (2) The truth-value of a given moral proposition can vary relative to something or someone (cultures, individuals, attitudes, etc.). "Killing babies is always wrong." This moral sentence, for the relativist, is a ...


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Is absolute moral relativism impossible? No. Not only is it possible, but it is fact. Having a moral sense is probably specific to gregarious species, in particular the human species. A moral code only applies within a social community and will be specific to that community. It is a consequence of both natural selection and the social relations within a ...


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An objective morality would have to exist beyond human comprehension, as a Kantian thing-in-itself. In contrast, the individual human take on morality is a personal, relative morality. A major part of Nietzsche's project was to disabuse us of the notion of the thing-in-itself. For example, from his unpublished notes: The Will to Power, 558 The thing-in-...


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You’ve left out the possibility of Moral Nihilism from your argument - that there might be no moral truths, and everyone is wrong about any affirmations of moral value, including moral nihilists, because morality statements fail to refer to facts. Not to say that moral nihilism is a conclusion you should draw - more that your argument requires more to ...


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